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Hacer un pase

English translation: To pass one's hand

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Hacer un pase
English translation:To pass one's hand
Entered by: Kaiser_Soze
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22:02 Oct 25, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings / Coloquialismos
Spanish term or phrase: Hacer un pase
Zoltan *hace un pase* con la mano frente al rostro de Balsar, y éste cae hipnotizado.

Sería el mismo caso que hacer un "pase" de magia (pases mágicos), pero no como un "pase" de soccer o American football. Se refiere a un movimiento estilizado de la mano que usan los magos y los hipnotistas. En México se les conoce como "pases". Alguna idea de cómo se les llama en inglés (USA). Gracias a todos de antemano.
Kaiser_Soze
Mexico
Local time: 21:38
waves/passes his hand across...
Explanation:
waves his hand across/before Balsar's face, and the man is instantly hypnotized

I know "instantly" isn't in there explicitly, but I think it's needed. "Passes the hand" is used in this context --

stare at his eyes while he passes his hand downward over her face.
www.hypnosisinmedia.com/Fiction/ScienceFiction.html

Krishna nodded, and passed his hand over Helene's eyes.

"I am going to release you from my control," he said quietly. "You
will wake up, and you will remember nothing of what happened while you were asleep. Now. You are no longer under my control. Wake up!"
http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0604001.txt
Selected response from:

Patricia Rosas
United States
Local time: 19:38
Grading comment
I like it. It's sound like a natural way to say it. Thanks, Patricia!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4waves/passes his hand across...
Patricia Rosas
4sleight of hand / legerdemain
Ana Paula Rodríguez, CT
4make a movement
Mónica Belén Colacilli


  

Answers


16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
make a movement


Explanation:
An option
Zoltan makes a movement with his hand...

Hope it helps

Mónica Belén Colacilli
Argentina
Local time: 23:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thank you for your suggestion!

Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
waves/passes his hand across...


Explanation:
waves his hand across/before Balsar's face, and the man is instantly hypnotized

I know "instantly" isn't in there explicitly, but I think it's needed. "Passes the hand" is used in this context --

stare at his eyes while he passes his hand downward over her face.
www.hypnosisinmedia.com/Fiction/ScienceFiction.html

Krishna nodded, and passed his hand over Helene's eyes.

"I am going to release you from my control," he said quietly. "You
will wake up, and you will remember nothing of what happened while you were asleep. Now. You are no longer under my control. Wake up!"
http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks06/0604001.txt

Patricia Rosas
United States
Local time: 19:38
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 20
Grading comment
I like it. It's sound like a natural way to say it. Thanks, Patricia!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Luque Bedregal
19 mins
  -> thank you...

agree  bigedsenior
1 hr
  -> thank you, too...

agree  NC translators: thanks
9 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Carol Gullidge: 'slowly' perhaps, and 'in front of' rather than 'across' (??)
11 hrs
  -> maybe, but I just realized that in the 2 ex. I cited, it is "over the face"... anyway, thanks, Carol, for sharing your ideas!
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
sleight of hand / legerdemain


Explanation:
Según The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language:

sleight of hand
NOUN: Inflected forms: pl. sleights of hand
1. A trick or set of tricks performed by a juggler or magician so quickly and deftly that the manner of execution cannot be observed; legerdemain. 2. Performance of conjuring tricks. 3. Skill in performing conjuring tricks.

Según el Webster's:
sleigh of hand
1. skill in feats requiring quick and clever movements of the hands, esp. for entertainment or deception, as jugglery, card or coin magic, etc.; legerdemain.
2. the performance of such feats.
3. a feat of legerdemain.

Sleight of hand - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Sleight of hand is not a branch of magic, but rather the means used by a... Sleight of hand is mostly employed in close-up magic, but it can also be used...
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sleight_of_hand

Learn Sleight of Hand Magic Right Now
Sleight of Hand Magic with Coins and Cards - the Ultimate in Sleight of Hand Training!
www.ellusionist.com/Sleight-of-Hand-Magic.htm

Learn sleight of hand card tricks at Download Magic
Learn to do sleight of hand magic wth cards quickly and easily with THE BASICS from award winning magician Steve Fearson!
www.downloadmagic.com/basics/

Card Tricks using Sleight of Hand
Card tricks using sleight of hand - free - great fun to learn!
www.card-trick.com/sleight_of_hand_card_tricks.htm

Saludos,
Ana



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-25 23:42:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Yes, you are totally right, Kaiser. I understood the concept but... well... I was wrong, as simple as that!! Anyway, the idea here is to learn, at least for me. Sorry and hope you get a good answer! (I like Patricia's best!)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-10-25 23:46:26 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

(I just checked for "pase de magia" in the Oxford bilingual dictionary and it also says "sleight of hand"...)

Ana Paula Rodríguez, CT
Argentina
Local time: 23:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: I think what you're referring to is called "prestidigitación" from PRESTO (quick) and DIGITUS (finger). It's just about quickly moving your fingers and "PASE" refers to an almost graceous and slow movement to put people to sleep. All ideas are welcome. Thanks, Ana.

Asker: Sorry, I meant GRACIOUS. :)

Asker: You're right. We're all learning. Thank you for your input.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Mimi810: "sleight of hand" isn't a term normally used with hypnosis; it's most often used to describe magic tricks such as making a handkerchief disappear, it speaks to the deft movements of the magician's hands
19 mins
  -> Thanks for your comment, Mimi!
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