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malito

English translation: sick

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22:02 Jan 15, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Idioms / Maxims / Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: malito
En lenguaje coloquial, una madre humilde le pide a su hijo que se abrigue para que no se enferme:
"Ponte bufanda para que no te pongas malito"
¿Cuál sería su equivalente en inglés?
Muchas gracias
Clarisa Moraña
Argentina
Local time: 15:02
English translation:sick
Explanation:
"Put on your scarf so you won't get sick."

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Note added at 4 hrs (2008-01-16 02:46:57 GMT)
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Soy mamá en inglés y también en español. Tal y como comenté a José Alejandro, en un contexto como éste, en inglés se tiende a transmitir con el tono de voz el sentimiento que en español se expresa con el uso del diminutivo. Aunque sí se utiliza el "baby talk" como otros han sugerido, normalmente se limita a usarlo con los más pequeños.

Una opción para transmitir esa dulzura, sería "Put on your scarf so you won't get sick, dear."
Selected response from:

GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 13:02
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias a todos. Realmente ha sido muy difìcil calificar debido a los intensos, y muy enriquecedores, debates a favor y en contra. A todos, toditos, mil gracias.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +10sick
GoodWords
4 +5catch cold / get sick
Jason Hall
4 +3put on the scarf because mommy/mom doesn't want you to get sick/catch something
Lydia De Jorge
5feel yucky
JoseAlejandro
5sick
Elisabete Coutinho
4poorlyBobo Lockett


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
sick


Explanation:
Babylon Dic.

sick
adj. enfermo, doliente, indispuesto; disgustado; mareado, con náuseas; mórbido, patológico

x
s. los enfermos

Elisabete Coutinho
Angola
Local time: 19:02
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  JoseAlejandro: Not the same register
3 hrs

agree  carosisi: Esto se dice mucho en Colombia, ponerse malito es enfermarse.
5 hrs
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +5
catch cold / get sick


Explanation:
Put on a scarf so you don't catch cold / get sick.

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Note added at 54 mins (2008-01-15 22:57:23 GMT)
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Mom's list to Santa - Baby Corner Pregnancy & Parenting Message
Either of these can have a somewhat "tender" connotation from mother to child/infant:

Here are references from Mommy Talk , Toronto's new mother survival guide, and even mom's list to Santa...doesn't get any more maternal than this!:

Mommy Talk
- [ Traduzca esta página ]
... air and had to make sure my child was bundled correctly so he wouldn’t catch cold. ... Mommy Talk is a site where parents can share the daily trials, ...
www.helenair.com/blog/mommytalk/ - 22k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

Toronto's new mother survival guide
- [ Traduzca esta página ]
Pool temperature is 88 degrees so little ones won't catch cold. ... sessions with infant experts (where you can ask all sorts of paranoid new-mom questions, ...
www.canada.com/national/nationalpost/news/toronto/story.htm... - 125k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

Mom's list to Santa Moms of Girls. ... trip and remember to leave your wet boots by the chimney and come in and dry off by the fire so you don't catch cold. ...
www.thebabycorner.com/boards/showthread.php?t=317228 - 66k - En caché - Páginas similares - Anotar esto

Jason Hall
Ecuador
Local time: 13:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yaotl Altan
7 mins
  -> Thank you Yaotl.

agree  Elin Davies: catch cold is my choice here
2 hrs
  -> Thank you....a mother putting a scarf on a kid....so he or she won't cath cold. Simple as that!

agree  Rantes
2 hrs
  -> Thank you!

agree  Liz Slaney: Yes, I say "catch cold" rather than "get sick" to my daughter in a chilly context.
3 hrs
  -> That is what my mommy would say to me.

disagree  JoseAlejandro: But, you CAN tell an adult not to catch cold. That's natural, too. So, the key here is finding the cutsie equivalent for "malito", when addressing a child. It may or may not be "yucky"...the human experience is universal. Just saying "sick" is a copout
3 hrs
  -> When you say "copout" you must be backtranslating the term to enfermarse and be totally missing the meaning of the expression in English in this context. Please consult a native English speaker who has kids.

agree  John Cutler
17 hrs
  -> Thank John, from my perspective this is a natural thing to say to a child.

agree  Sergio Lahaye: what i was told often as a kid in the UK
2 days5 hrs
  -> Thanks Sergio, my mommy would tell me the same thing. Were this being decided by native English speakers there wouldn't we much debate...the controversy comes from this expression being backtranslated to "enfermarse".
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
put on the scarf because mommy/mom doesn't want you to get sick/catch something


Explanation:
It's a way of maintaining the tenderness of her words because there really is no equivalent for 'malito'

Lydia De Jorge
United States
Local time: 14:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 90

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marian Martin: I like mommy doesn't want you to catch something.:-)
31 mins
  -> Thanks Marian!

agree  Claudia Pesce: I´m with Martin. I would definitely add "mommy"; it sounds soooo sweet :D
1 hr
  -> Thanks Claudia!

agree  LadyofArcadia: Right... there is not an equivalent meaning for "malito", so Clarisa will have to figure out how to introduce the mother's "tender feeling" from the context itself!
1 hr
  -> Thanks LoA!

neutral  JoseAlejandro: You can use "mommy", I suppose...but I disagree: there are always equivalents. The human experience is universal. There are "cutsie" ways of saying things everywhere there are kids.
2 hrs
  -> Thanks for your opinion.
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
feel yucky


Explanation:
It's an option. I'll try to come up with some others...

JoseAlejandro
Local time: 11:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bobo Lockett: hi José Alejandro, nice to see you here again! // I agree with Lady of Arcadia! José Alejandro, please accept an honorary degree from Deborah!
27 mins
  -> Thank you so much, Debbie! It's nice to see you, too!

agree  LadyofArcadia: Actually, that is not bad!!!
28 mins
  -> Why, thank you, mi Lady!!

neutral  Lydia De Jorge: Sorry, 'yucky' does not necessarily mean 'sick'. You might feel yucky when your hands are dirty or you are sweaty, etc.
1 hr
  -> It's only one of several options. There ARE ways of saying "malito". We just need to research it...that's all.

disagree  Sergio Lahaye: agree with lydia... wouldn´t use this for someone getting ill
1 hr
  -> It's only one of several options...maybe you just haven't heard of this one. Oh, well.

disagree  Jason Hall: I'm with Lydia... // I have worked in schools for years...trust me, yucky is in my vocabulary. I just do not see the target audience understanding the intention of the source text with yucky.
2 hrs
  -> You might not see it, because it may not exist in your English vocabulary. But there ARE equivalents for "malito". Just saying "sick" is totally wrong, though. Register is important.
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30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
poorly


Explanation:
so you don't get poorly (lenguaje ligeramente infantil)

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Note added at 4 horas (2008-01-16 02:22:30 GMT)
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¡32.700 resultados para búsqueda de "get poorly"! ¡¡¡Carumba!!!

Bobo Lockett
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 83

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  baiksekali: http://www.answers.com/topic/poorly
17 mins
  -> muchas gracias por el enlace baiksekali, un abrazo :-) Deborah

disagree  Jason Hall: "get poorly" is bizarre and not readily recognized.
18 mins
  -> I'm so glad you agree with me at last! Thank you!!!
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5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
sick


Explanation:
"Put on your scarf so you won't get sick."

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 hrs (2008-01-16 02:46:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Soy mamá en inglés y también en español. Tal y como comenté a José Alejandro, en un contexto como éste, en inglés se tiende a transmitir con el tono de voz el sentimiento que en español se expresa con el uso del diminutivo. Aunque sí se utiliza el "baby talk" como otros han sugerido, normalmente se limita a usarlo con los más pequeños.

Una opción para transmitir esa dulzura, sería "Put on your scarf so you won't get sick, dear."

GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 13:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
Muchísimas gracias a todos. Realmente ha sido muy difìcil calificar debido a los intensos, y muy enriquecedores, debates a favor y en contra. A todos, toditos, mil gracias.
Notes to answerer
Asker: ¿No existe una palabra en inglés que transmita la misma dulzura que esta mamá en español? Para mi no es lo mismo "para que no te enfermes" que "para que no te pongas malito". Eso es lo que quiero diferenciar.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Yaotl Altan
7 mins

agree  Salloz
16 mins

agree  twiningsfan
25 mins

agree  Marisa Raich
25 mins

agree  LadyofArcadia: Maybe something like, "Put on your scarf for Mommy so you won't get sick"
1 hr

disagree  JoseAlejandro: This doesn't possess the register that the Asker wants...sorry.
3 hrs
  -> I think it does. In English in this context, it would be conveyed by tone of voice, even though the words are the same.

agree  Gacela20
3 hrs

agree  Claudia Hoepelman: for crying out loud, can't get any simpler than that!!
4 hrs

agree  Jason Hall: Amen to that!
4 hrs

agree  carosisi: Esto se usa mucho en Colombia. Ponerse malito es enfermarse y puede ser por más de una causa, no sólo un resfriado.
5 hrs

agree  Horticulturist: El uso de los diminutivos en el español de Hispanoamérica está tan generalizado que se utiliza regularmente aunque no se pretenda un sentido cariñoso intencionado. No obstante, en una frase como ésta, el sentido cariñoso en inglés se da con el tono de voz
11 hrs

agree  rdom: OK for "dear"! If you are a mother in both languages, you know best."For Mommy" is good too.
12 hrs
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
Non-PRO (1): Juan Jacob


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Changes made by editors
Jan 15, 2008 - Changes made by Juan Jacob:
Language pairEnglish to Spanish » Spanish to English
Jan 15, 2008 - Changes made by Elisabete Coutinho:
Language pairSpanish to English » English to Spanish
Jan 15, 2008 - Changes made by baiksekali:
Language pairEnglish to Spanish » Spanish to English


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