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conchuda

English translation: lucky bitch

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:conchuda
English translation:lucky bitch
Entered by: Hinara
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

01:51 Aug 20, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Idioms / Maxims / Sayings / coloquialism, possible expletive
Spanish term or phrase: conchuda
document from Argentina:

Employee complains that a co-worker referred to a manager as a "conchuda".

"SE DIRIGIO A LA DIRECTORA, LA SRA. GARCIA COMO "CONCHUDA" CUANDO LE INFORMARON QUE IBA A TENER UN 15% DE AUMENTO, Y PASILLEO COMO TODO EL TIEMPO DURANTE MI ESTADIA EN...
Hinara
United States
Local time: 16:12
lucky bitch
Explanation:
Another suggestion. Still has the undertone of an insult but not as vulgar as with the term "cunt" which has a totally different connotation in English.

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Note added at 1 day12 hrs (2012-08-21 14:00:52 GMT)
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http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=: -LUCKY BiT...

If the translation is for the U.S., then this term conveys what was meant in the source language.
Selected response from:

Francesca Samuel
United States
Local time: 16:12
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4 +1shameless
Gloria Rivera
4 +1lucky bitch
Francesca Samuel
4stubborn
Blanca Collazo
4A lucky person
DLyons
3stupid bitchRowan Morrell
4 -1cuntpatinba
5 -2lucky cunt
Rosa Paredes


Discussion entries: 6





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
shameless


Explanation:
Hi,
If the dialogue is from Peru, I would use "shameless" since it´s the closest equivalent to that term.
Gloria

Gloria Rivera
United States
Local time: 16:12
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
Notes to answerer
Asker: That makes sense.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  José J. Martínez: yes...a little like a freeloader that can ask for more without deserving....
1 min
  -> Thanks Jose!

neutral  patinba: Asker has said it is from Argentina, not Peru, and it does not have that meaning in Argentina.
16 hrs
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
stubborn


Explanation:
at least, in my neck of the woods.



Blanca Collazo
Local time: 16:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -1
cunt


Explanation:
from concha (vulg.) = vulva

Definitely a strong insult in Argentina

patinba
Argentina
Local time: 20:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria Alejandra Aguada
21 mins
  -> Gracias!

disagree  Francesca Samuel: Not the same type of meaning in English.
10 hrs

disagree  Lucy Breen: "Cunt" is highly offensive & vulgar. More so, I believe, than "concha".
1 day4 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
stupid bitch


Explanation:
According to the online Collins dictionary, "conchudo" can mean "bloody idiot" or "jerk" in usage around the Andes region (so southwestern South America, but could also include Argentina, I think).

Given that the manager in question is a female, one might use a term like "stupid bitch", which would certainly be highly offensive. It's similar to "bloody idiot", but more gender-specific. If the manager were male, an equivalent insult might be "stupid jerk" (or the aforementioned "bloody idiot").


    Reference: http://www.collinsdictionary.com/dictionary/spanish-english/...
Rowan Morrell
Local time: 12:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
lucky cunt


Explanation:
To me the answer is a combination of patinba's and DLyons suggestions. In Chile 'conchuda' is a woman who's lucky and the term is an insult

Rosa Paredes
Canada
Local time: 16:12
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Lucy Breen: Muy fuerte! "Cunt" is highly offensive & extremely vulgar - more so than "concha"
1 day2 hrs

disagree  Francesca Samuel: Totally in agreement with Lucy. Too offensive and vulgar. Does not apply here.
1 day9 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
A lucky person


Explanation:
1) persona que tiene buena suerte
2) mala persona

These are the Argentinian usages given by the AALE's "Diccionario de americanismos".

The first seems more likely in the context.


DLyons
Ireland
Local time: 00:12
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20
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11 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lucky bitch


Explanation:
Another suggestion. Still has the undertone of an insult but not as vulgar as with the term "cunt" which has a totally different connotation in English.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 day12 hrs (2012-08-21 14:00:52 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=: -LUCKY BiT...

If the translation is for the U.S., then this term conveys what was meant in the source language.

Francesca Samuel
United States
Local time: 16:12
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lucy Breen: Yes
17 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lucy!
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