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favelizándose

English translation: will become a shantytown or slum / one huge favela

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:favelizándose
English translation:will become a shantytown or slum / one huge favela
Entered by: Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
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11:27 Feb 13, 2009
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Journalism / Brasil
Spanish term or phrase: favelizándose
"El problema de la vivienda es una de las asignaturas pendientes en este país, que de no poner remedio urgente acabará, según los analistas,**favelizándose** por completo."

Iba a traducirlo así, pero creo que no estoy traduciendo la idea del autor del artículo:

"The housing problem is one of this country's unresolved matters: analysts say that if it isn't solved urgently, the country will **become one huge favela.**"
Kalga
Local time: 10:33
will become a shantytown or slum
Explanation:

favela

SYLLABICATION: fa·ve·la
PRONUNCIATION: f-vl
NOUN: A shantytown or slum, especially in Brazil.


favela

a shanty or shantytown


Favela
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2008)
Look up favela in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Vidigal, a Rio de Janeiro favela.A favela is a specifically Portuguese word for a shanty town, and can also be an insult in Russian or German. The majority have electricity, but in most cases it is illegally tapped from the public grid. Favelas are constructed from a variety of materials, ranging from bricks to garbage. Many favelas are very close and very cramped. They are plagued by sewage, crime and hygiene problems. Many of the most infamous are located in Rio de Janeiro. In Rio one in every four cariocas (as Rio's inhabitants are called) lives in a favela.[1] As a general rule, Brazilian cities do not recognize the existence of favelas as a legal entity. The name originates from a species of plant with thorny leaves that grows in the semi-arid North-East region. Refugees and former soldiers involved in the Canudos Civil War (1895–1896) in Bahia would eventually settle on unreclaimed public land on a hill in Rio de Janeiro called Morro da Providência, because the government failed to provide any housing for them. There the former soldiers named their new settlement Morro da Favela, after a plant which had thrived at the site of their famous victory against the rebels.[2]

Over the years, many freed black slaves moved in, contributing to its current state of poverty by replacing refugees as the major ethnic group. However, long before the first settlement called "favela" came into being, poor blacks were pushed away from downtown into the far suburbs. Favelas were handy for them because they allowed them to be close to work, while keeping away from where they were not welcome.[citation needed]
Description
A favela is fundamentally different from a slum or tenement, primarily in terms of its origin and location. While slum quarters in other Latin American countries generally form when poorer residents from the countryside come to larger cities in search of work, and while this also occurs to some extent with favelas, the latter are unique in that they were chiefly created as large populations became displaced.[citation needed]Favelas differ from ghettos such as those in the United States in that they are racially mixed, even though blacks make up the majority of the population - that is, in Brazil it is chiefly economic forces, rather than ethnic or cultural issues, that drive people there. Although favelas were first mostly made up of most Afro-Brazilians they slowly began to consist of many European immigrants arriving in the 19th century.[3]

Shanty towns are units of irregular self-constructed housing that are typically unlicensed and occupied illegally. They are usually on lands belonging to third parties, and are most often located on the urban periphery. Shanty town residences are built randomly, although ad hoc networks of stairways, sidewalks, and simple tracks allow passage through them. Most favelas are inaccessible by vehicle, due to their narrow and irregular streets and walkways and often steep inclines.[citation needed]

These areas of irregular and poor-quality housing are often crowded onto hillsides, and as a result, these areas suffer from frequent landslides during heavy rain. In recent decades, favelas have been troubled by drug-related crime and gang warfare. There are often common social codes in some favelas which forbid residents from engaging in criminal activity inside their own favela.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favela
Selected response from:

Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 11:33
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +4will become a shantytown or slum
Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
4will end up in a slum
Juan Carlos García


Discussion entries: 10





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +4
will become a shantytown or slum


Explanation:

favela

SYLLABICATION: fa·ve·la
PRONUNCIATION: f-vl
NOUN: A shantytown or slum, especially in Brazil.


favela

a shanty or shantytown


Favela
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding reliable references. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2008)
Look up favela in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

Vidigal, a Rio de Janeiro favela.A favela is a specifically Portuguese word for a shanty town, and can also be an insult in Russian or German. The majority have electricity, but in most cases it is illegally tapped from the public grid. Favelas are constructed from a variety of materials, ranging from bricks to garbage. Many favelas are very close and very cramped. They are plagued by sewage, crime and hygiene problems. Many of the most infamous are located in Rio de Janeiro. In Rio one in every four cariocas (as Rio's inhabitants are called) lives in a favela.[1] As a general rule, Brazilian cities do not recognize the existence of favelas as a legal entity. The name originates from a species of plant with thorny leaves that grows in the semi-arid North-East region. Refugees and former soldiers involved in the Canudos Civil War (1895–1896) in Bahia would eventually settle on unreclaimed public land on a hill in Rio de Janeiro called Morro da Providência, because the government failed to provide any housing for them. There the former soldiers named their new settlement Morro da Favela, after a plant which had thrived at the site of their famous victory against the rebels.[2]

Over the years, many freed black slaves moved in, contributing to its current state of poverty by replacing refugees as the major ethnic group. However, long before the first settlement called "favela" came into being, poor blacks were pushed away from downtown into the far suburbs. Favelas were handy for them because they allowed them to be close to work, while keeping away from where they were not welcome.[citation needed]
Description
A favela is fundamentally different from a slum or tenement, primarily in terms of its origin and location. While slum quarters in other Latin American countries generally form when poorer residents from the countryside come to larger cities in search of work, and while this also occurs to some extent with favelas, the latter are unique in that they were chiefly created as large populations became displaced.[citation needed]Favelas differ from ghettos such as those in the United States in that they are racially mixed, even though blacks make up the majority of the population - that is, in Brazil it is chiefly economic forces, rather than ethnic or cultural issues, that drive people there. Although favelas were first mostly made up of most Afro-Brazilians they slowly began to consist of many European immigrants arriving in the 19th century.[3]

Shanty towns are units of irregular self-constructed housing that are typically unlicensed and occupied illegally. They are usually on lands belonging to third parties, and are most often located on the urban periphery. Shanty town residences are built randomly, although ad hoc networks of stairways, sidewalks, and simple tracks allow passage through them. Most favelas are inaccessible by vehicle, due to their narrow and irregular streets and walkways and often steep inclines.[citation needed]

These areas of irregular and poor-quality housing are often crowded onto hillsides, and as a result, these areas suffer from frequent landslides during heavy rain. In recent decades, favelas have been troubled by drug-related crime and gang warfare. There are often common social codes in some favelas which forbid residents from engaging in criminal activity inside their own favela.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Favela


Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.)
Spain
Local time: 11:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 44
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rafael Bordabehere
3 mins
  -> Gracias Rafael

agree  Noni Gilbert
5 mins
  -> Gracias noni

agree  James A. Walsh
1 hr
  -> Many thanks James

agree  Maria-Jose Pastor
2 hrs
  -> Gracias María-José
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
will end up in a slum


Explanation:
Another option

Juan Carlos García
Local time: 06:33
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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Changes made by editors
Feb 27, 2009 - Changes made by Margarita Ezquerra (Smart Translators, S.L.):
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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