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"Su Señoría". Is. Filipinas, 1782

English translation: His Lordship

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02:12 Jul 20, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
Spanish term or phrase: "Su Señoría". Is. Filipinas, 1782
Documentos sobre el monopolio del tabaco en las Filipinas durante el siglo XVIII y XIX.

I'm not sure as to what English title would be appropriate for "su Señoría" in this context.

"Muy ilustre Señor Don Joseph Basco y Vargas.
Muy Ilustre Señor: Los Directores de la Renta del tabaco dicen que necesitan tener en estas oficinas testimonio del expediente de la contrata de tabaco del Bando ultimamente publicado (...) Dirección General de la renta del tabaco de Manila y Junio veinte y cinco de mil setecientos ochenta y dos. Juan Antonio Panelo. Juan de Urrengoechea y Arrinda.--------------------------------------------------

- Real Palacio de Manila, primero de julio de mil setecientos ochenta y dos. Rubricado de **su Señoría**.----
- Con esta fecha se despachó el testimonio que ha pedido la Dirección general de la Renta del tabaco. Manila diez y siete de Agosto de mil setecientos ochenta y dos.-------- "

¡gracias!
A Hayes
Australia
Local time: 10:19
English translation:His Lordship
Explanation:
My level of confidence is low, but this is a possibility. The DRAE does not define specifically which rank of nobility or position is addressed as "Su Señoría".

a title used to address any British peer except a duke and extended to a bishop or a judge; "Your Lordship"; "His Lordship"
the authority of a lord

wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

François Thibault: "His Lordship" vs. "The Honorable Lord"
I hold a Grant of Arms from the King of the West. In the West, the form of address used for a GoA is "His Lordship" . In much of the rest of the Known Worlde (including, apparently, the East, where I am now), it's "The Honorable Lord". I have decided to stick with "His Lordship", because, to me, "The Honorable Lord" sounds like it's saying that someone with a mere Award of Arms is not honorable. To me, this is discourteous.

(Plus, it lends itself to a joke: right after I received the GoA, a friend said, "François! You're a boat!". :-)

Of course, this isn't a major point; addressing people by title is' fairly rare anyway. In a formal context (listing me in a newsletter, calling me into Court), I might try to make a point of it; and, if the person referring to me refused to use "His Lordship", I might ask to be referred to simply as "Lord".

http://www.thibault.org/newhome/sca/lordship.html
Selected response from:

George Rabel
Local time: 20:19
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +3Your ExcellencyGabo Pena
3 +2His HonorNizo
4distinguished Mr. Joseph Basco y Vargas..
Xenia Wong
2His Lordship
George Rabel


Discussion entries: 7





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
distinguished Mr. Joseph Basco y Vargas..


Explanation:
sug.

Xenia Wong
Local time: 19:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 400
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

34 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Su Señoría
His Honor


Explanation:
"Signed by His Honor."

The bill, introduced by Councilwoman Madeline Provenzano, was signed by His Honor on Monday, February 26.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 34 mins (2005-07-20 02:46:47 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or \"His Honour\" UK style.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 37 mins (2005-07-20 02:49:13 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\'Subsequent inspection of the original file revealed that orders were signed by his Honour on 7 May 2002\'.

In English it\'s almost always immediately followed by a name or title, but it sometimes stands alone.

Nizo
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Francisco Pavez
1 hr
  -> Gracias!

agree  xxxBAmary
21 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

58 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Your Excellency


Explanation:
sug.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2005-07-20 03:11:55 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Illustrious

Gabo Pena
Local time: 17:19
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Gabriela Rodriguez
1 min
  -> thnx!

agree  Daniel Burns: From the context it must be "his excellency".
1 hr
  -> thnx!

agree  Marina Soldati
10 hrs
  -> thnx!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Su Señoría
His Lordship


Explanation:
My level of confidence is low, but this is a possibility. The DRAE does not define specifically which rank of nobility or position is addressed as "Su Señoría".

a title used to address any British peer except a duke and extended to a bishop or a judge; "Your Lordship"; "His Lordship"
the authority of a lord

wordnet.princeton.edu/perl/webwn

François Thibault: "His Lordship" vs. "The Honorable Lord"
I hold a Grant of Arms from the King of the West. In the West, the form of address used for a GoA is "His Lordship" . In much of the rest of the Known Worlde (including, apparently, the East, where I am now), it's "The Honorable Lord". I have decided to stick with "His Lordship", because, to me, "The Honorable Lord" sounds like it's saying that someone with a mere Award of Arms is not honorable. To me, this is discourteous.

(Plus, it lends itself to a joke: right after I received the GoA, a friend said, "François! You're a boat!". :-)

Of course, this isn't a major point; addressing people by title is' fairly rare anyway. In a formal context (listing me in a newsletter, calling me into Court), I might try to make a point of it; and, if the person referring to me refused to use "His Lordship", I might ask to be referred to simply as "Lord".

http://www.thibault.org/newhome/sca/lordship.html


George Rabel
Local time: 20:19
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 39
Grading comment
Thank you!
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