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otorgar cuantos contratos o elevaciones a público de los mismos

English translation: execute the necessary contracts or notarial instruments

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:otorgar cuantos contratos o elevaciones a público de los mismos
English translation:execute the necessary contracts or notarial instruments
Entered by: Rebecca Jowers
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09:49 Oct 31, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s)
Spanish term or phrase: otorgar cuantos contratos o elevaciones a público de los mismos
From a services contract:

Caso de ser necesario Don XXXX se compromete a otorgar cuantos contratos o elevaciones a público de los mismos sean necesarios.

Specifically looking for a good way to word the "elevaciones al publico" part- thanks in advance!
Sherry Godfrey
Local time: 04:16
execute the necessary contracts or notarial instruments
Explanation:
"elevar a público" refers to the process of having a private contract reflected in a notarial instrument ("escritura pública")

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-10-31 12:01:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Escritura pública" is often (mis)translated, even in published works and dictionaries, as "public deed". This fact has often been discussed on Proz and was the topic of a presentation on the pitfalls of translating notarial documents presented a a past American Translators Association Convention (see below). In modern English "deed" properly refers to a document that conveys real property (sale of real estate, etc), while an "escritura pública" is a notarial instrument whose contents often cannot properly be called a "deed" because its contents often have nothing to do with the conveyance of real property (such as powers of attorneys reflected in "escrituras públicas" or an "escritura pública" incorporating a corporation, changing a company's name or business purpose, etc.). This distinction has been underscored by Thomas West in his "Spanish-English Dictionary of Law and Business" Protea Publishing, 1999:

escritura pública--document recorded by an notary; a notarial instrument. The English term "deed" means a document by which real property is transferred. (Thus, for example) a power of attorney recorded in an "escritura pública" is not a "deed" in English, so the term "escritura pública" must be translated as "notarial instrument" or "notarially recorded instrument." (Thomas West is a lawyer, translator and former President of the ATA).

Here is part of two previous discussions concerning how to translate "elevación a escritura pública" and "elevar a público":

Since "escritura" is often mistranslated as "public deed", I am copying some of my observations in the other entry below. Hope you find this useful.

"Elevar a público" means "to record in a notarial instrument," which in Spain is called an "escritura pública". I do not think it would be appropriate here to translate "elevar a público" as "to record in a public deed." In English a "deed" is not a notarial instrument, but rather a "an instrument by which land is conveyed" or that "conveys some interest in property" (Black's Law Dictionary). Thus, as indicated by Tom West in his "Spanish-English Dictionary of Law and Business", "escritura pública" must be translated as "notarial instrument" or "notarially-recorded instrument." The foregoing was underscored at an ATA (American Translators Association) Legal Translation Conference presentation on commonly mistranslated notarial terminology: "Escritura pública: Notarially recorded instrument or document. Described as the "mother" of all documents. Kept in the notarial record book and never taken out. Not the same as a deed, which is an instrument that conveys land."
(reproduced in the July-August 2003 issue of "The Gotham Translator", Publication of the New York Circle of Translators, pp. 6-7.)
http://www.nyctranslators.org/GothamTranslator/pdf/July-Augu...

In other respects, I do not think that "to record in a public instrument" would be an appropriate translation of "elevar a público", since in English "public instrument" does not mean "notarial document (or) instrument," and thus does not convey what "elevar a público" actually involves in Spain. Likewise, "elevar a público" is much more than merely making a transaction public before a notary, since it means having a civil law notary record a given transaction in a notarial instrument that will henceforth become a part of his notarial records ("protocolo") and will serve as official evidence of that transaction vis-à-vis third parties and may be submitted as evidence of such in court.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1462094

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1446714

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/231414

etc.





Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 04:16
Grading comment
Thanks everyone - I believe Rebecca's answer concisely covers what is being conveyed here. (And thanks for the explanations!)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1execute the appropriate contracts or procedures for making these public deeds
AllegroTrans
5execute the necessary contracts or notarial instrumentsRebecca Jowers


  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
execute the appropriate contracts or procedures for making these public deeds


Explanation:
@@@

AllegroTrans
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 452

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxAdrian MM.: engrossing them as...
8 hrs
  -> thanks, yes this works well
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
execute the necessary contracts or notarial instruments


Explanation:
"elevar a público" refers to the process of having a private contract reflected in a notarial instrument ("escritura pública")

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2007-10-31 12:01:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

"Escritura pública" is often (mis)translated, even in published works and dictionaries, as "public deed". This fact has often been discussed on Proz and was the topic of a presentation on the pitfalls of translating notarial documents presented a a past American Translators Association Convention (see below). In modern English "deed" properly refers to a document that conveys real property (sale of real estate, etc), while an "escritura pública" is a notarial instrument whose contents often cannot properly be called a "deed" because its contents often have nothing to do with the conveyance of real property (such as powers of attorneys reflected in "escrituras públicas" or an "escritura pública" incorporating a corporation, changing a company's name or business purpose, etc.). This distinction has been underscored by Thomas West in his "Spanish-English Dictionary of Law and Business" Protea Publishing, 1999:

escritura pública--document recorded by an notary; a notarial instrument. The English term "deed" means a document by which real property is transferred. (Thus, for example) a power of attorney recorded in an "escritura pública" is not a "deed" in English, so the term "escritura pública" must be translated as "notarial instrument" or "notarially recorded instrument." (Thomas West is a lawyer, translator and former President of the ATA).

Here is part of two previous discussions concerning how to translate "elevación a escritura pública" and "elevar a público":

Since "escritura" is often mistranslated as "public deed", I am copying some of my observations in the other entry below. Hope you find this useful.

"Elevar a público" means "to record in a notarial instrument," which in Spain is called an "escritura pública". I do not think it would be appropriate here to translate "elevar a público" as "to record in a public deed." In English a "deed" is not a notarial instrument, but rather a "an instrument by which land is conveyed" or that "conveys some interest in property" (Black's Law Dictionary). Thus, as indicated by Tom West in his "Spanish-English Dictionary of Law and Business", "escritura pública" must be translated as "notarial instrument" or "notarially-recorded instrument." The foregoing was underscored at an ATA (American Translators Association) Legal Translation Conference presentation on commonly mistranslated notarial terminology: "Escritura pública: Notarially recorded instrument or document. Described as the "mother" of all documents. Kept in the notarial record book and never taken out. Not the same as a deed, which is an instrument that conveys land."
(reproduced in the July-August 2003 issue of "The Gotham Translator", Publication of the New York Circle of Translators, pp. 6-7.)
http://www.nyctranslators.org/GothamTranslator/pdf/July-Augu...

In other respects, I do not think that "to record in a public instrument" would be an appropriate translation of "elevar a público", since in English "public instrument" does not mean "notarial document (or) instrument," and thus does not convey what "elevar a público" actually involves in Spain. Likewise, "elevar a público" is much more than merely making a transaction public before a notary, since it means having a civil law notary record a given transaction in a notarial instrument that will henceforth become a part of his notarial records ("protocolo") and will serve as official evidence of that transaction vis-à-vis third parties and may be submitted as evidence of such in court.

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1462094

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1446714

http://www.proz.com/kudoz/231414

etc.







Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 04:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 770
Grading comment
Thanks everyone - I believe Rebecca's answer concisely covers what is being conveyed here. (And thanks for the explanations!)

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  xxxAdrian MM.: 1. priv. vs. pub. is a neater split than priv. vs. not. cf. priv. contract of land sale vs. registerable conveyance 2. Deeds don't just convey land/interest cf. a Name Change Deed Poll /DoFa 3. not. insts. imply sep. docs. 4. Civ. Notaries keep a Protocol
9 hrs

neutral  AllegroTrans: diasagree with your definition of deed - it is a legal document executed under seal and does not have to be a transfer of land
10 hrs
  -> Deed=conveyance of land may be more US than UK usage. However I refrain from using "deed" since the term does not reflect the meaning of "escritura" as a notarially-certified instrument.
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Changes made by editors
Nov 4, 2007 - Changes made by Rebecca Jowers:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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