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Should the title "Dr." be left in English if it is not an MD?

English translation: Atty. (Attorney)

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Should the title "Dr." be left in English if it is not an MD?
English translation:Atty. (Attorney)
Entered by: Henry Hinds
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12:45 Jul 4, 2004
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law: Contract(s) / Official titles
Spanish term or phrase: Should the title "Dr." be left in English if it is not an MD?
"...otorgado por ante Notario de Fe Pública Dra. X."

As I understand by the answers provided to another question of mine, a "Notario de Fe Pública" is a lawyer, and lawyers in Latin Countries are referred to as "Dr.".
As far as I know, the title "Dr." is not used for lawyers in the US.
So my dilemma is, should I cut out the "Dr." from the English version?
Also, that "otorgado por ante" sounds rather fishy to me. It would be either or, but not both. In this case, being "otorgado", I believe it would be "granted BY", not "granted BEFORE", since it is the notary who is doing the granting.
George Rabel
Local time: 11:10
Atty. (Attorney)
Explanation:
The person is an attorney, so that is the title to be used in translation - Dr. Juan González Pérez = Juan González Pérez, Atty., after the name.

In the case of "Lic". (Licenciado) when the person is an attorney it is the same also.

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Note added at 11 hrs 0 min (2004-07-04 23:45:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is not to be left out; it should be left IN as stated.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 09:10
Grading comment
Thanks to all. I agree that "Dr." should not be used, but if the person is accorded an honorifica tittle in his, her country, I believe the translation should reflect that, and not just "leave out".
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +9Leave out
Michael Powers (PhD)
5 +1Atty. (Attorney)
Henry Hinds
5(name), Esq.
Karina Pellegrineschi
4J.D. / Esq. / Attorney
Luisa Ramos, CT


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
Should the title
Leave out


Explanation:
MD

DO

PhD

The three uses of "Dr." in the US

Mike :)



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 4 mins (2004-07-04 12:50:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Chiropractors also use the title \"Dr.\" although they are not physicians. Physicians are either \"M.D.\'s\" or \"D.O.\'s\"



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Note added at 5 mins (2004-07-04 12:51:33 GMT)
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I agree - \"granted by\"

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 11:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 977

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Lorenia Rincon
4 mins
  -> Thank you, Lorenia - Mike :)

agree  translatol: ..but add MusD (Doctor of Music) and some other doctorates to your list, including Doctor of Laws (LLD).
32 mins
  -> Thank you, translatol - I agee with MusD, EdD, and any other type of doctarate degree in general. As far as LLD, although technically a doctorate in law, in actual usage, attorneys rarely if ever refer to each other as "Dr." in the US.

agree  Xenia Wong
1 hr
  -> Thank you, Xenia - Mike :)

agree  Tom2004: boy ur in big trouble if ur dentist happens to see this! lol
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Tom - you're right, he would probably yank all my teeth! - Mike :)

agree  xxxRNolder
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, RNolder - Mike :)

agree  Scott Rasmussen: Yes, leave out. Indeed, in some Latin American countries lawyers are referred to as "Dr."--but nearly always lack an LL.D. degree. Certainly, don't use "Dr." with a notary.
2 hrs
  -> Yes, I agree - in Spanish the title "doctor" is frequently used with attorneys - a term of respect - Mike :)

agree  Richard Cadena: You might want to use Ms, since she is a lady. Also, "otorgado por" should be "executed by". Salsaludos con aché, Richard
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Richard - I like that "executed by" suggestion - Mike :)

agree  David Jessop: Yes, leave it out. It is a joda to think that my brother, who is in law school, could be called Dr. afterwards. It makes me crack up thinking of it ;-). David
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, David - mis pésames a tu hermano - qué va, hombre, sabemos que hay diferencia entre tiburón y abogado - que aquél evita éste para que no llegue a ser cena - Mike :)

agree  Refugio: In the United States it is considered pretentious for PhDs or lawyers to ask to be addressed as Doctor by introducing themselves as Dr. X. Dentists, however, should receive the title automatically.
4 hrs
  -> I agree it is pretentious for an individual to "ask" to be addressed by an honorific. - Mike :)
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40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Should the title
J.D. / Esq. / Attorney


Explanation:
before me, Notary Public XXX, Esq. (or J.D.)
or before Attorney XXX, Notary Public.

Here in PR where a notary must be an attorney they are adamant about the title and this is what we use.

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Note added at 42 mins (2004-07-04 13:28:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I forgot to add: ...but not all attorneys are notaries.

Luisa Ramos, CT
United States
Local time: 11:10
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 27

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  translatol: It seems to depend on the jurisdiction.
8 mins
  -> Yes, indeed. Thanks for your comment.

neutral  Refugio: In the case of a woman, Esq. would not be used.
4 hrs
  -> You are right, I left that out. I always use Attorney, though.
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Should the title
Atty. (Attorney)


Explanation:
The person is an attorney, so that is the title to be used in translation - Dr. Juan González Pérez = Juan González Pérez, Atty., after the name.

In the case of "Lic". (Licenciado) when the person is an attorney it is the same also.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 hrs 0 min (2004-07-04 23:45:43 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

It is not to be left out; it should be left IN as stated.

Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 09:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 2331
Grading comment
Thanks to all. I agree that "Dr." should not be used, but if the person is accorded an honorifica tittle in his, her country, I believe the translation should reflect that, and not just "leave out".

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio
9 hrs
  -> Gracias, Ruth.
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22 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Should the title
(name), Esq.


Explanation:
Esq. or attorney-at-law


    Reference: http://www.bmacewen.com/blog/
Karina Pellegrineschi
Canada
Local time: 11:10
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 7
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