KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Law (general)

decreto (en este contexto)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
18:00 Sep 4, 2006
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general) / Law
Spanish term or phrase: decreto (en este contexto)
Habrá una reunión para definir el único decreto que llevará más tiempo, que es el de las máquinas de juego.

This is referring to a casino which is being built in Spain. I think they are negotiating with the local authorities certain changes to the law. Perhaps in this context it could mean "regulations."
Elena Mart�nez
Spain
Local time: 04:32
Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5delegated legislationRebecca Jowers
4 +1order in Council
MikeGarcia
4 +1law applicable to a specific sector (industry)
Michael Powers (PhD)
4decree
Miguel Orlandini


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
law applicable to a specific sector (industry)


Explanation:
West - Law Dictionary

Mike :)

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 22:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2030

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Edward Tully
4 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
order in Council


Explanation:
IF this is for Spain, it is a decree that legislates and rules the matter, approved by the Council of Government, and enacted by the President of that Council.-

If it's for another country, given the context that's offered, a more extensive version of it would be needed, such as from which jurisdiction is the decree issued.- For instance, for Argentina it would be a decree-law (decreto ley)....

See the Alcaraz Varó Hughes Legal.-

MikeGarcia
Spain
Local time: 04:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 654

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Barbara Cochran, MFA
55 mins
  -> Thanks, femme.-
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
delegated legislation


Explanation:
In Spain and in this context "decreto" refers to a "decreto legislativo" as defined in Art. 82 of the Constitution, a piece of "delegated legislation," i.e., legislation passed by the government, rather than by Parliament (because the Parliament has delegated the government powers to legislate in that specific case). Rather than being a law that refers to a specific sector, the essential definition here is that this "decree" in this context refers to delegated legislation to be enacted by the government. But this detail is probably not essential to your translation either, and I believe you could simply translate "decree" in this case as "law" or "legislation". For info, here is the definition of DECRETO LEGISLATIVO--Norma con valor de ley dictada por el Gobierno en virtud de una previa habilitación que recibe del Parlamento. La autorización parliamentaria se conoce como delegación legislativa. hay dos clases de decretos legislativos: aquellos que refundan textos legislativos en uno solo y los que tienen por objeto formar textos articulados. Para ambos tipos la Constitución exige que la delegación se otorgue "de forma expresa, para materia concreta y con fijación de plazo para su ejercicio." Quedan excluidas de la delegación las materias reservadas a Ley Orgánica.
(Diccionario Jurídico Thompson-Aranzadi, 3rd. ed., 2004)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-09-04 19:06:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I don't know whether to withdraw my initial answer and give "regulation" as another option, since as always, the context will determine the correct choice. An additional problem is that there are at least three types of legislative/regulatory procedures in Spain that contain the term "decreto".

I have reviewed the different types of Spanish legislation and, given that the text concerns the regulation of a casino, perhaps this specific use of "decreto" does not refer to a "decreto legislativo" (delegated legislation) but rather to a "real decreto", which is defined as follows:

En el sistema jurídico español, un Real Decreto es una norma jurídica con rango de reglamento, que emana del poder ejecutivo (Gobierno) en virtud de las competencias al mismo atribuidas por la legislación vigente. Se sitúa en el orden de prelación de las normas jurídicas inmediatamente después de las normas con rango de Ley y antes de la Orden ministerial.

Su diferencia con la primera es que emana del poder ejecutivo y no del poder legislativo. Su diferencia con la segunda es que el Real Decreto precisa para su adopción de la aprobación por el Presidente del Gobierno o del acuerdo del Consejo de Ministros, mientras que la Orden ministerial puede establecerse por parte de un solo ministerio.

Tanto los Reales Decretos como las Órdenes Ministeriales integran la potestad reglamentaria de la Administración Pública. Los reglamentos, en virtud del principio de jerarquía normativa, no pueden contradecir lo dispuesto en las leyes.
http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Real_Decreto

As you can see, a "real decreto" has the "rango de reglamento" and is passed by the "administración pública". If this fits your context, then as you first suggested, then perhaps "decreto" should be translated as "regulation", rather than as "law" or "legislation".

(There is a third type of Spanish legislation that contains the word "decreto", the "decreto ley", which I do not think would be applicable here: a type of emergency legislation that the government can pass without delegated authority, but which must be ratified by the parliament within 30 days.)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2006-09-04 19:22:29 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

To add a comment to "decree" as an option, I believe it should be underscored that "decree" and "decreto" as used in Spain are "false friends." The three types of "decretos" used in Spain and described above in my answer are all legislative or reglamentary instruments passed either by the parliament (legislative branch of government) or the government (executive branch of government). In contrast, in English the term "decree" refers to a JUDICIAL decision. Here are the definitions for "decree" from "Black's Law Dictionary", 8th ed., 2004):

Decree: 1. Traditionally, a judicial decision in a court of equity, admiralty, divorce or probate, similar to a judgment in a court of law. 2. A court's final judgment. 3. Any court order, but especially one in a matrimonial case. "divorce decree"

"Black's" then lists many types of decrees ("divorce decree", "custody decree", "decree of insolvency," "decree of nullity," etc.), all of which are judicial decisions totally unrelated to the meaning of "decretos" in Spanish, which are legislative or reglamentary instruments.

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 04:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2050
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

23 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
decree


Explanation:
Creo que en este contexto se refiere a la regulación de una ley existente, mediante un Real Decreto.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2006-09-05 04:05:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As in the vast majority of hipanoamerican countries, argentinean right is widely inherited from Spaniard legislation, and the Derecho de Indias.

This inheritance is not only related to legislation itself, but to laws’ hierarchy.

The spaniard crown, as the president in my fatherland, is allowed to regulate laws by decree.

This decrees are, in my country, “legislación de segundo grado” , with the significance that can not modify genuine laws issued by the legislative branch.

As the context in the asked translation, was related to gambling, and this is a very old industry, I supposed it was long ago legislated by the legislative branch. Thus, a decree, here, could only be enacted as regulatory


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 hrs (2006-09-05 04:16:14 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Creo que "Royal decree" es lo mas parecido a las "executive orders" del derecho de USA, puesto que tambien son utilizados para reglamentar, y al mismo tiempo, el término "Royal decree" es ampliamente utilizado y conocido.
Elena, éxitos con la traducción y saludos a todos los participantes del hilo.


    Reference: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decree
Miguel Orlandini
Local time: 23:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rebecca Jowers: At least as used in Spain, I believe "decree" and "decreto" are "false friends". I add a comment with examples.
47 mins
  -> Rebecca, thanks by your kindly comment.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search