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debemos absolver y absolvemos

English translation: we decide to acquit

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02:29 Mar 18, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law (general) / Compraventa de acciones
Spanish term or phrase: debemos absolver y absolvemos
., y estimando la excepción de falta de legitimación pasiva alegada por el Abogado del Estado, debemos absolver y absolvemos a la Administración del Estado de los pedimentos contra ella deducidos y debemos condenar y condenamos a XXXX., a que abone a los actores la cantidad de ZZZZZZ ,
Silvia Gentili
Argentina
Local time: 15:43
English translation:we decide to acquit
Explanation:
me parece que con "decide" se recoje la doble frase en castellano, la opinión y el hecho de ejecutarla

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Note added at 8 mins (2007-03-18 02:38:37 GMT)
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cuidado con "to absolve" que en inglés cobra un cariz religioso que no se adapta siempre al contexto legal
Selected response from:

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 13:43
Grading comment
I agree. Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3we hereby find for the defendantRebecca Jowers
5 +1we must, and we do exonerate
Flavio Posse
4 +2we decide to acquitJH Trads
4we decide to absolvePaul Merriam


  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
we decide to acquit


Explanation:
me parece que con "decide" se recoje la doble frase en castellano, la opinión y el hecho de ejecutarla

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2007-03-18 02:38:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

cuidado con "to absolve" que en inglés cobra un cariz religioso que no se adapta siempre al contexto legal

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 13:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 79
Grading comment
I agree. Thank you

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JaneTranslates: Good distinction between "absolve" and "acquit."
11 mins
  -> thanks Jane!

agree  Xenia Wong
55 mins
  -> thanks Xenia!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
we decide to absolve


Explanation:
First off, although absolve is used in religious contexts, it also has the following definitions in Black's seventh edition:
1. to release from an obligation, debt, or responsibility
2. to free from the penalties for misconduct

Acquit is usually used in criminal cases, but here are the definitions from Black's:

1. to clear (a person) of a criminal charge
2. to pay or discharge (a debt or claim)

I believe that using "acquit" here would give the misleading impression that the court has decided to pay what "la Administración" is being asked for. In fact, I believe the court is simply saying that "la Administración" doesn't have to pay the amount in question or perform whatever other remedies it's being asked for.


Paul Merriam
Local time: 14:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 139
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
we must, and we do exonerate


Explanation:
.

Flavio Posse
United States
Local time: 11:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 368

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Neil Crockford: I think one needs to preserve the idea of obligation
5 hrs
  -> Thank you, Neil.
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
we hereby find for the defendant


Explanation:
From this and other questions that Silvia has asked, I believe it is clear that these are not criminal proceedings and, thus, I believe "acquit", "absolve", or "exonerate" would be both inappropriate and misleading.

This is the final disposition (judgment = "sentencia") of a civil case and therefore "absolver" = "to find for the defendant", while "condenar" = "to find for the plaintiff".

In that respect, Thomas West's "Spanish-English Dictionary of Law and Business" (p. 210) clearly explains the difference in civil and criminal procedure terminology:

Sentencia absolutoria--1. (in a civil case) judgment for the defendant. 2. (in a criminal case) acquittal; verdict of not guilty

Sentencia condenatoria--1. (in a civil case) judgment for the plaintiff. 2. (in a criminal case) guilty verdict

You can certainly word this differently, but a quick rendering of the text might go something like this:

...and denying the motion of lack of standing to be sued alleged by the Government Attorney, we hereby find for the (defendant) government administration with respect to the petitions made against it, hereby ordering XXXX to compensate plaintiffs in the amount of XXXX.

See:
http://www.proz.com/kudoz/1330413


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Note added at 8 hrs (2007-03-18 10:58:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

SORRY:
The text above should read "...and ALLOWING the motion of lack of standing..." rather than "DENYING"
(too early on Sunday morning, no coffee yet)

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 20:43
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 2050

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MikeGarcia: Hope the coffee was flavoury, and strong...
2 hrs
  -> Yes, thanks Miguel. Me tomé un cortado doble. That did the trick!

agree  AllegroTrans: Yes, civil proceedings- could also say "we dismiss the claim" effectively the same thing
10 hrs
  -> Thanks AllegroTrans

agree  Derrio: Agree totally. Would certainly be correct in a UK Court
10 days
  -> Thanks you, Derrio. I think the asker didn't realize that these are civil proceedings, since "acquit" was chosen. The term "actores" (plaintiffs; claimants) is also a clue that these are not criminal proceedings.
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