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intransferible, intransmisible, irrenunciable

English translation: non transferable, non transmissible, non waivable

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:intransferible, intransmisible, irrenunciable
English translation:non transferable, non transmissible, non waivable
Entered by: Elsa Chu
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

19:10 Jul 5, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents - Law (general)
Spanish term or phrase: intransferible, intransmisible, irrenunciable
El derecho a alimentos nace como efecto de la relación parento - filial, mira al orden público familiar y es intransferible, intransmisible, irrenunciable, imprescriptible y no admite compensación.

How can I make the difference in English when they all have the same equivalents?

nontransferable, inalienable, ...

I'm missing one, suggestions??

Thanks!
Elsa Chu
Local time: 01:41
non transferable, non transmissible, non waivable
Explanation:

http://lists.debian.org/debian-legal/2007/09/msg00164.html
Non-waivable Compulsory License Scheme

http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/waiver.html
1. SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance on non-waivable employee rights under

http://law.justia.com/massachusetts/codes/gl-pt1-toc/93e-4a....
Chapter 93E — Section 4A. Marketing agreements; mandatory non-waivable provisions.
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforced statutes.


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Note added at 13 mins (2008-07-05 19:23:39 GMT)
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You did not ask for "inalienable" but inalienable is correct. Check the following ref

nalienable rights
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rights
Animal rights
Children's rights
Civil and political rights
Fathers' rights
Gay rights
Group rights
Human rights
Inalienable rights
Individual rights
Legal rights
Men's rights
Natural right
Negative & positive
Claims & liberties
Reproductive rights
Right of self-defense
Economic, social and cultural rights
"Three generations"
Women's rights
Workers' rights
Youth rights
This box: view • talk • edit

The term inalienable rights (or unalienable rights) refers to a theoretical set of individual human rights that by their nature cannot be taken away, violated, or transferred from one person to another. They are considered more fundamental than alienable rights, such as rights in a specific piece of property.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inalienable_rights
Inalienable (Individual) Rights are: natural rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. They are the most fundamental set of human rights, natural means not-granted nor conditional. They are applicable only to humans, as the basic necessity of their survival.


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Note added at 14 mins (2008-07-05 19:25:11 GMT)
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Ooops, did not mean to include all the "navigation" wikireferences, slipped my finger I guess. Sorry for the unnecessary clutter.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2008-07-05 19:35:58 GMT)
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A further ref I received today from Merriam Webster's:


inalienable \in-AY-lee-uh-nuh-bul\ adjective
: incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred

Example sentence:
"Just because I can use my work e-mail for personal correspondence doesn't mean I have the inalienable right to do so," Brian explained.

Did you know?
"Alien," "alienable," "inalienable" -- it's easy enough to see the Latin word "alius," meaning "other," at the root of these three words. "Alien" joined our language in the 14th century, and one of its earliest meanings was "belonging to another." By the early 1600s that sense of "alien" had led to the development of "alienable," an adjective describing something you could give away or transfer ownership of, and "unalienable," its opposite. By about 1645, "inalienable" was also in use as a synonym of "unalienable." "Inalienable" is the more common variant today, but it was "unalienable" that was used in the Declaration of Independence to describe rights like life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.
Selected response from:

Nelida Kreer
Uruguay
Local time: 05:41
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Niki and everybody else for helping out
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8non transferable, non transmissible, non waivable
Nelida Kreer
4unwaivable, inalienable, unassignable
Guadalupe -
4inalienable, non transferable, unrenounceable
Terejimenez


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
non transferable, non transmissible, non waivable


Explanation:

http://lists.debian.org/debian-legal/2007/09/msg00164.html
Non-waivable Compulsory License Scheme

http://www.eeoc.gov/policy/docs/waiver.html
1. SUBJECT: Enforcement Guidance on non-waivable employee rights under

http://law.justia.com/massachusetts/codes/gl-pt1-toc/93e-4a....
Chapter 93E — Section 4A. Marketing agreements; mandatory non-waivable provisions.
Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) enforced statutes.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2008-07-05 19:23:39 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You did not ask for "inalienable" but inalienable is correct. Check the following ref

nalienable rights
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Rights
Animal rights
Children's rights
Civil and political rights
Fathers' rights
Gay rights
Group rights
Human rights
Inalienable rights
Individual rights
Legal rights
Men's rights
Natural right
Negative & positive
Claims & liberties
Reproductive rights
Right of self-defense
Economic, social and cultural rights
"Three generations"
Women's rights
Workers' rights
Youth rights
This box: view • talk • edit

The term inalienable rights (or unalienable rights) refers to a theoretical set of individual human rights that by their nature cannot be taken away, violated, or transferred from one person to another. They are considered more fundamental than alienable rights, such as rights in a specific piece of property.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Inalienable_rights
Inalienable (Individual) Rights are: natural rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness. They are the most fundamental set of human rights, natural means not-granted nor conditional. They are applicable only to humans, as the basic necessity of their survival.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 14 mins (2008-07-05 19:25:11 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ooops, did not mean to include all the "navigation" wikireferences, slipped my finger I guess. Sorry for the unnecessary clutter.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 25 mins (2008-07-05 19:35:58 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A further ref I received today from Merriam Webster's:


inalienable \in-AY-lee-uh-nuh-bul\ adjective
: incapable of being alienated, surrendered, or transferred

Example sentence:
"Just because I can use my work e-mail for personal correspondence doesn't mean I have the inalienable right to do so," Brian explained.

Did you know?
"Alien," "alienable," "inalienable" -- it's easy enough to see the Latin word "alius," meaning "other," at the root of these three words. "Alien" joined our language in the 14th century, and one of its earliest meanings was "belonging to another." By the early 1600s that sense of "alien" had led to the development of "alienable," an adjective describing something you could give away or transfer ownership of, and "unalienable," its opposite. By about 1645, "inalienable" was also in use as a synonym of "unalienable." "Inalienable" is the more common variant today, but it was "unalienable" that was used in the Declaration of Independence to describe rights like life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness.


Nelida Kreer
Uruguay
Local time: 05:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 619
Grading comment
Thanks a lot Niki and everybody else for helping out

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ingrafia: excellent!
20 mins
  -> Many thanks indeed! Saludos.

agree  Trujaman: Right on the money honey!
1 hr
  -> Estamos "versátiles" hoy.....Gracias Trujaman!

agree  Mónica Sauza: Great!! ;)
2 hrs
  -> Qué amable Mónica, muchas gracias!

agree  Silvina Morelli
3 hrs
  -> Gracias mil Silvina!

agree  Egmont
3 hrs
  -> Agradecida y muchos saludos!

agree  Robert Mota
4 hrs
  -> Gracias de nuevo Robert!!

agree  Maru Villanueva: ¡Saludos!
4 hrs
  -> Mil gracias Maru y buen fin de semana!!

agree  Steven Huddleston: Exactly!
8 hrs
  -> Steven, thnx a lot!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
inalienable, non transferable, unrenounceable


Explanation:
Otra forma de decirlo

.... imprescriptible

CNAThe vote is a preliminary step toward putting a "parental rights" provision in .... “Children have an unrenounceable right to have a father and a mother. ...
www.catholicnewsagency.com/showarchive.php?date=2004-02-18 - 45k - Cached - Similar pages
Family Issues: Presentations - Oral Hearings - The All-Party ...We hope an expression and acknowledgement of children’s rights in the ... and imprescriptible rights, antecedent and superior to all positive law”. ...
[PDF] FOOD IS A HUMAN RIGHTFile Format: PDF/Adobe Acrobat - View as HTML
inalienable right to nutrition. The Universal Declaration of Human Rights had. already asserted the right to sufficient food. What we must now do is ensure ...




Terejimenez
Local time: 03:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 200
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
unwaivable, inalienable, unassignable


Explanation:
Another option... I thought you may be interested in this example...
However, I agree with Niki's option, too!

Example sentence(s):
  • Moral rights should be unwaivable, inalienable and unassignable.

    Reference: http://www.creatorscopyright.ca/documents/platform-jan08.htm...
Guadalupe -
Local time: 05:41
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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