KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Law/Patents

infinitives in law sentences

English translation: is it podrá that is the problem?

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
00:51 May 13, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: infinitives in law sentences
In a power of attorney, for example, most verbs granting powers are given in the infinitive form, e.g. to buy, sell, exchange, etc, but what happens when you need to use a subject? In Spanish, the subjunctive or the non-use of subject pronouns avoids the issue, but what happens in English?

He/she?

One?

Here's an example,

Interesar a la Sociedad en cualquier asociación, sociedad, agrupación, comunidad o entidad civil o mercantil, pública, autónoma o privada, nacional o extranjera, o de cualquier otro tipo, incluso Juntas de compensación, sociedades de empresas, asociaciones sin personalidad jurídica y agrupaciones temporales, a cuyo efecto *****podrá***** constituir o intervenir en la constitución con cualquiera otra persona física o jurídica
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 04:33
English translation:is it podrá that is the problem?
Explanation:
if so, why not say

and, to this effect, to incorporate or intervene in this incorporation, ... etc.

Sorry if I haven't understood the q.
Selected response from:

MJ Barber
Spain
Local time: 04:33
Grading comment
Yes, podrá, and your answer was possibly perfect, except I'm not sure if one shouldn't account for the 'possiblity of doing sthg' rather than just 'doing' it. I've done the text, but was curious, will bear it in mind for the future.

Go raibh míle maith agat!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
5 +2is empowered toMaria-Jose Pastor
5To...
Henry Hinds
5Pls see explanation belowManuel Cedeño Berrueta
4Refer to the beginning
Nora Escoms
4is it podrá that is the problem?
MJ Barber


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
is it podrá that is the problem?


Explanation:
if so, why not say

and, to this effect, to incorporate or intervene in this incorporation, ... etc.

Sorry if I haven't understood the q.

MJ Barber
Spain
Local time: 04:33
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in pair: 891
Grading comment
Yes, podrá, and your answer was possibly perfect, except I'm not sure if one shouldn't account for the 'possiblity of doing sthg' rather than just 'doing' it. I've done the text, but was curious, will bear it in mind for the future.

Go raibh míle maith agat!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Refer to the beginning


Explanation:
Hi,
I don't know what the complete context is, but I guess the subject must appear somewhere before the enumeration of infinitives, so I think you should refer to that.
HTH

Nora Escoms
Argentina
Local time: 23:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 31
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Pls see explanation below


Explanation:
Usually, powers of attorney written in English use the following construction: if the power of attorney is granted to one attorney: “to this effect, he/she/said attorney may…”; if the power of attorney is granted to more than one attorney: “to this effect, they/said attorneys may…”
Ref: exp.
Good luck


Manuel Cedeño Berrueta
Local time: 22:33
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1094
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
To...


Explanation:
Use the infinitive in English also, we are lacking the context that comes before it but what you have appears to be part of a listing of the powers but such listing may and is often made by starting each item with an infinitive:

1. To... (do all of this)
2. To... (do all of that) etc.

We know who is to do it all, it is the attorney-in-fact.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 20:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
is empowered to


Explanation:
regretably legalese is very complicated. In the USA, legal documents take the third person singular or plural.

Maria-Jose Pastor
Local time: 22:33
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 152

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Worklog
1 hr

agree  Virginia Ledesma Tovar: better and look for the first subject at the beginning of the never ending sentence.
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search