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inderogable

English translation: unrepealable rights

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:inderogable
English translation:unrepealable rights
Entered by: Bill Greendyk
Options:
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14:00 Aug 27, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: inderogable
what is the correct English expression for 'derechos inderogables'?

Thanks for your help!
Kathleen Ferny
Belgium
Local time: 15:24
unrepealable rights
Explanation:
This is according to Louis Robb in his Dictionary of Legal Terms.

saludos!
Selected response from:

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 09:24
Grading comment
Thanks!
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2unrepealable rights
Bill Greendyk
3 +1inalienable rights
Henry Hinds


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
unrepealable rights


Explanation:
This is according to Louis Robb in his Dictionary of Legal Terms.

saludos!

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 09:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 527
Grading comment
Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jacob Lagnado
1 hr

agree  Russell Gillis: This one doesn't appear to be very common though. How about "irrevocable"?
2 hrs
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48 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
inalienable rights


Explanation:
This is used in the U.S., but it may or may not be the same thing. These are rights that are held to be natural rights that every human being has; they are not granted by any law but are recognized as being inherent.

Is it the same thing or is it a lesser standard? That I don't know.

"Unrepealable" as Bill suggests would basically mean that once granted, they cannot be taken away. To me, "Inalienable" rights have always been there.

Maybe we can get a good discussion going here.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 07:24
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Russell Gillis: From my dictionary, inalienable means that they cannot be transferred to another, but it might not necessarily mean that they have always been there.
1 hr
  -> Basically the idea is that they can never be taken away, which is the actual meaning, but the philosophy is also that they are inherent.

agree  siante
1 hr
  -> Thanks,Siante.
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