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de

English translation: I would not translate it

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:de
English translation:I would not translate it
Entered by: Garboktrans
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

17:41 Jan 16, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Law/Patents
Spanish term or phrase: de
I have a general question: throughout the text, there are headings beginning with the preposition “de”. How do I translate these bits? Also, what I don’t understand is why sometimes the “de” is put in and sometimes not.

For example, it says “**DE** LA PERSONA Y DE LA SOCIEDAD”, but it says “DERECHOS FUNDAMENTALES DE LA PERSONA”.

Why not the other way round – “LA PERSONA Y DE LA SOCIEDAD” and “**DE** LOS DERECHOS FUNDAMENTALES DE LA PERSONA”???

Here are some more examples:

TITULO I: **DE** LA PERSONA Y DE LA SOCIEDAD
Artículos del 1o. al 42o.

CAPITULO I: DERECHOS FUNDAMENTALES DE LA PERSONA
Artículos del 1o. al 3o.

CAPITULO II: **DE** LOS DERECHOS SOCIALES Y ECONOMICOS
Artículos del 4o. al 29o.

CAPITULO III: **DE** LOS DERECHOS POLITICOS Y DE LOS DEBERES
Artículo del 30o. al 38o.

TITULO IV: **DE** LA ESTRUCTURA DEL ESTADO
Artículo del 90o al 199o.

CAPITULO I: PODER LEGISLATIVO
Artículo del 90o. al 102o.

CAPITULO II: **DE** LA FUNCION LEGISLATIVA
Artículos del 103o. al 106o.

Why this inconsistency?

Also, there are some cases where it says both:

CAPITULO III
**DE LA PROPIEDAD**

**PROPIEDAD**. PRINCIPIOS GENERALES
Artículo 70o.- El derecho de propiedad es inviolable. El Estado lo garantiza. Se ejerce en armonía con el bien común y dentro de los límites de ley. A nadie puede privarse de su propiedad sino, exclusivamente, por causa de seguridad nacional o necesidad pública, declarada por ley, y previo pago en efectivo de indemnización justipreciada que incluya compensación por el eventual perjuicio. Hay acción ante el Poder Judicial para contestar el valor de la propiedad que el Estado haya señalado en el procedimiento expropiatorio.

Shall I just translate the bits with “de” as “On...” (“On property”, “On individual and society”, etc.), without racking my brains about it?
Olaf Reibedanz
Colombia
Local time: 16:37
I would not translate it
Explanation:
leave "de" out
Selected response from:

Garboktrans
Spain
Local time: 23:37
Grading comment
Thank you all for your contributions!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +10I would not translate it
Garboktrans
5 +2nada
Pamela Peralta
4 +1onSheilann
5OnSean Lyle
4On/AboutRantes
3Concerning
Adam Thomson


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +10
I would not translate it


Explanation:
leave "de" out

Garboktrans
Spain
Local time: 23:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 263
Grading comment
Thank you all for your contributions!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.
3 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Carlos Diaz de Leon: when it says "de" it means what the paragraph is about (sort of like "as regards" or "about"), I would leave it out.
3 mins
  -> as a certified translator in Spain, I always omit it

agree  Todd Field: definitely leave the "de" out, keeping consistent titles throughout (e.g. "Property")
7 mins
  -> thanks

agree  Sery
24 mins
  -> thanks

agree  xxxRNolder: with carlosdl's comments too!
1 hr
  -> thanks! Me too!

agree  xxxcmwilliams
4 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Henry Hinds: Like Carlos says and Pamela explains, it's something that is sometimes just there for no real reason; I sometimes use when going it into Spanish and always leave it out when going into English.
6 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Nado2002
6 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  Refugio
11 hrs

agree  margaret caulfield
1 day20 hrs
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9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
on


Explanation:
The heading means "on the person" or whatever follows.
I always omit it.

Sheilann
Spain
Local time: 23:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 886

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  rhandler: Precisely!
48 mins
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
nada


Explanation:
Hola Olaf,
Esto me lo enseñaron el la escuela de traducción, pero en traducción jurídica del inglés al español. Por ejemplo, en la traducción de un purchase agreement donde decía:

Article I
Purpose

Se traduce:

Artículo I
Del Objeto

Y así sucesivamente. Realmente no me acuerdo cuál fue la explicación del profesor para usar de o del, quizá fue que así es la costumbre, no sé. Pero lo que sí sé es que el "del" o "de" no se traduce.

Suerte,
Pamela

Pamela Peralta
Peru
Local time: 16:37
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 251

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cebice: It just means "about" in Spanish and it is not translated
6 mins
  -> Gracias por tu comentario, saludos :)

agree  luzba
3 hrs
  -> Gracias Luzba :)
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
On


Explanation:
This is the text of a law, and such texts often try to err on the side of clarity (when not going for deliberate obfuscation) and hence often sound a bit old-fashioned.

Since your original appears to be inconsistent, you have three possible strategies, 1, reproduce the inconsistency, 2, translate the "de", adding it everywhere, or 3, omit it everywhere.

My own tendency would be to reproduce the original inconsistency on the grounds that it repeats the feel of the original in the translation, and both versions are perfectly valid and intelligible. I don't usually believe in trying to "tidy up" our target texts, unless there is very good reason.

Otherwise, if you want to give the thing a more "modern" feel, omit the "On" and for a more archaic, "legalistic" feel, stick 'em in everywhere.

There are some good books on legal style, one I recommend (he leans towards the "modern style") is "A Dictionary of Modern Legal Usage" by Garner, OUP; it's American, I'm afraid, but you can't have everything!! ...and he does recognise the existence of British.

Sean Lyle
Local time: 23:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
On/About


Explanation:
I would put this, which is what it means.

Rantes
Local time: 16:37
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 121
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1 day18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Concerning


Explanation:
Noting that a lot of people have already commented, I would still suggest that we have "concerning" an individual or a human image, and then, maybe, "on" inanimate images. Either way, it seems that it is an introductory term in a legal context, and that you use "concerning" and "on" as the case arises

Adam Thomson
Local time: 22:37
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 133
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