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pirata

English translation: (goddamn) lookout

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:pirata
English translation:(goddamn) lookout
Entered by: Michael Powers (PhD)
Options:
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10:02 Jun 16, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Linguistics / drug trafficking conversation
Spanish term or phrase: pirata
scenario - drug deal went bad

informal register

FRANCISCO: Mira xxxx ahí mismo pasó una camioneta y nos cayó en seguida.
Gabriel: ajá
Francisco: Entonces nosotros xxx la camioneta allá parqueada con la otra al lado.
Gabriel: m, m.
Francisco: xxx no sé xxxx cuál sea el problema de ella.
Gabriel: m, m
Francisco: En el mmento que entregamos y cuando salimos ahí mismo les cayó la camioneta.
Gabriel: ?Y este hijueputa pirata no estaba por ahí pendiente del tránsito ni nada de esa cosa?
Francisco: Nada no sé xxxx nos cayeron de esos de sorpresa xxxx vimos la vaina cerquita y xxxx
Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 01:23
lookout
Explanation:
Hi Mike. This is definitely a lookout. Hijueputa is an adjective in this case. Of course, you'd need a stronger word than lookout to make the translation sound better.
Selected response from:

Rene Ron
Venezuela
Local time: 01:23
Grading comment
Given the context, I believe "pirata" is a lookout here. Thank you for your help. Mike :)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5lookout
Rene Ron
4strange/weird looking
Luis Zepeda
2 +2motherfucking leech/motherfucker/bastard
cello


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +2
motherfucking leech/motherfucker/bastard


Explanation:
Now I'll go and wash my mouth out with soap.

I agree with Alvaro's comments - I also think that the two words go together i.e.'hijoputa pirata'. Motherfucker, if you want US or bastard you want UK. If, from the rest of the context, 'pirata' is important maybe you could use leech (pirates are a bit like parasites)
Anyway, they are just suggestions

cello
Local time: 07:23
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  jrb: only because I love your distinction between US and UK English! Are we really that polite? We do use naughty words sometimes, although maybe here we would go for "rotten scoundrel" :) [PS the suggestion is a joke - the famous British humour...]
36 mins
  -> Thanks Jessica. No. I don't think we are that polite, just that 'MF' sounds more Tarantino and 'bastard' more Guy Ritchie :-) I'm sure that we Brits can swear as well as anyone else...

agree  Cecilia Della Croce
1 day3 hrs
  -> Many thanks, Cecilia - although I'm not too convinced about it myself, bearing in mind Rene's answer and my personal experience (Spain rather than south America) :-)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
lookout


Explanation:
Hi Mike. This is definitely a lookout. Hijueputa is an adjective in this case. Of course, you'd need a stronger word than lookout to make the translation sound better.

Rene Ron
Venezuela
Local time: 01:23
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Given the context, I believe "pirata" is a lookout here. Thank you for your help. Mike :)
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
strange/weird looking


Explanation:
The term pirata has been utilized only during the past 6-10 years in terms other than the standard definitions, to designate something out of the usual street standards. "Chido" is sometimes used as the opposite

Luis Zepeda
United States
Local time: 22:23
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
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