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I'd

English translation: I'd is the contraction for I would and I had

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:I'd
English translation:I'd is the contraction for I would and I had
Entered by: Kim Metzger
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

17:44 Aug 5, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Art/Literary - Linguistics / education
Spanish term or phrase: I'd
me gustaria saber si I'd es la contraccion para I should, para I could y para I would.
Del mismo modo, must have = must've? should've= should have?
could have = could've?
fando34
Local time: 12:36
I'd
Explanation:
Michael Swan, Practical English Usage: "Contractions are common and correct in informal writing: they represent the pronunciation of informal speech. They are not generally used in a formal style."

I'd is the contraction for I would and I had but not for I could or I should. The latter two must be spelled out.

Yes: must have = must've should've = should have?
could have = could've
Selected response from:

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:36
Grading comment
thanks very much
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8I'd
Kim Metzger
5 +4I would, I had
NancyLynn
4 +2I'd have thought so
jerrie
5I had/I would; 've contractions OK
Paul Dixon


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
i'd
I would, I had


Explanation:
I'd done enough work for one day (I had)
I'd get even if I were you (I would)

I would've, should've, could've are all contractions with 'have'.



NancyLynn
Canada
Local time: 13:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: English

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Andreani
1 min

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 mins

agree  Heidi Stone-Schaller
2 mins

agree  Marijke Singer
46 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
i'd
I'd


Explanation:
Michael Swan, Practical English Usage: "Contractions are common and correct in informal writing: they represent the pronunciation of informal speech. They are not generally used in a formal style."

I'd is the contraction for I would and I had but not for I could or I should. The latter two must be spelled out.

Yes: must have = must've should've = should have?
could have = could've

Kim Metzger
Mexico
Local time: 12:36
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
thanks very much

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  cjperera
3 mins

agree  yolanda Speece: Very well explained, Kim...
6 mins

agree  Maria Faella
11 mins

agree  Claudia Andreani
18 mins

agree  Valeria Francesconi
50 mins

agree  Lesley Clarke: PS must have is only used for deductions, "should have" or "ought to have" for recommendations a posteriori
1 hr
  -> Nice point. There are also differences in usage between US and British English. Compare "I've not shown" with "I haven't shown."

agree  Vladimir Dubisskiy
1 hr

agree  Cecilia Calonico
6 hrs
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
i'd
I'd have thought so


Explanation:
I'd (I would) have ... thought so / done it if I could

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2004-08-05 18:10:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Re note:
I shouldn\'t have gone there
I wouldn\'t go there
I wouldn\'t have gone there
I won\'t go there
I will not go there (I\'ll not go there)


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 38 mins (2004-08-05 18:23:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have not gone = I haven\'t gone (to the cinema for years / I haven\'t been to the cinema for ages) = I\'ve not gone out/been out much recently

I must not have gone - doesn\'t work imo (I\'m sure there is a grammatical rule somewhere) ... I shouldn\'t have gone
I mustn\'t go...

jerrie
United Kingdom
Local time: 18:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Claudia Andreani
2 mins

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
3 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
i'd
I had/I would; 've contractions OK


Explanation:
I'd can be either "I had" or "I would". There is never any ambiguity as the uses are mutually exclusive.
I'd means I would before a verb in infinitive form: I'd go, I'd have gone.
I'd means I had before a participle: If only I'd known, and provided I'd had the time, I'd (= I would) certainly have replied sooner.
The 've contractions are fine, and I have heard them in the negative: It couldn't've been him. (in writing we would write "It couldn't have been him" as the two apostrophes look odd). I hope this helps to shed light on this fine point of linguistics.

Paul Dixon
Brazil
Local time: 14:36
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
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