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evite uso de muletillas

English translation: avoid using fillers/filler phrases

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:evite uso de muletillas
English translation:avoid using fillers/filler phrases
Entered by: Cinnamon Nolan
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

03:30 Feb 16, 2009
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Marketing / Market Research / Expressions
Spanish term or phrase: evite uso de muletillas
This expression comes from a set of instructions for medical sales representatives on how to deal with the doctors they visit.

• Si decide un tema personal debe ser versátil y **evite el uso de muletillas** y hacer comentarios trillados
Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 04:43
avoid using fillers
Explanation:
With thanks to María Eugenia.

Linguistically, this is what the type of words/phrases such as "you know, that is, I mean, er, well" etc.

Psychology of Language: Filler Words in Spoken Language
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1082645/psychology_...

Question: In English we have many "filler" words for when we don't know how to continue on in a sentence, ... In any case, in Spanish those "filler" words are called muletillas (or, less commonly, palabras de relleno) and are very common.
http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishvocabulary/a/filler_words...

In Spanish, fillers are called muletillas; some of the most common in American Spanish are e, este ("this") and o sea ("that is").
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filler_(linguistics)

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Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-16 05:49:00 GMT)
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Or "FILLER WORDS"
You can say "avoid using" or "avoid the use of". I prefer the former.

Filter out the filler words - Daily Report26 Oct 2007 ... Regardless of the language, filler words are universally seen as signs of uncertainty and even ignorance. In Russian, filler words are ...
www.dailyreportonline.com/Editorial/News/new_singleEdit.asp...

If your speech is peppered with pause fillers , it disrupts the enjoyment of your presentation and the appreciation of your message...
http://wekie.wordpress.com/2007/09/17/how-to-drastically-red...

Develop Command Of The Language4 Jan 2007 ... the ends of sentences so you won’t be tempted to use a filler word. ... Spend time improving your use of language and you will improve ...
www.speaking-tips.com/Articles/Develop-Command-Of-The-Langu...
Selected response from:

Cinnamon Nolan
Spain
Local time: 13:43
Grading comment
I learned something new! Thanks to both you and Maria Eugenia
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +6avoid using fillersCinnamon Nolan
4 +4avoid pet words/phrases
María Eugenia Wachtendorff
4 +3avoid using clichés
Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
5 +1avoid commonplaces
Wilsonn Perez Reyes
4avoid using stereotypical expressions (cliché)
Carlos Sorzano


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
avoid using stereotypical expressions (cliché)


Explanation:
mu·le·ti·lla Feminine - Noun - Singular
pet expression, cliché, overused expression repeated too many times in one's conversation as a cliché or an interjection, pet phrase, set phrase, filler, tag; Synonyms: frase manida, frase repetida de relleno en la conversación, bordoncillo, cliché, frase acuñada, frase estereotipada, frase hecha, frase trillada, palabra o expresión innecesaria en el discurso que se usa por hábito con demasiada frecuencia

stereotypical
adj. conventional, unoriginal

Carlos Sorzano
United States
Local time: 07:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Carmen Valentín
6 mins

disagree  Alex Lago: Muletillas are not cliches, they are sounds, words or phrases you repeat a lot while you talk
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +3
avoid using clichés


Explanation:
Hope this helps you.

[PPT]
Word Logic
- [ Traducir esta página ]
Formato de archivo: Microsoft Powerpoint - Versión en HTML
Avoid using Clichés—phrases used so often that people no longer pay attention to them. Examples: make ends meet, hard as a rock, playing with fire, ...
www.blinn.edu/humanities/writingroom/Word Logic WR.ppt - Páginas similares

Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
Local time: 06:43
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 36

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  David Russi
11 mins
  -> Thanks, David!

agree  nigthgirl
21 mins
  -> Thank you!

agree  liz askew
4 hrs

agree  ventnai
4 hrs

disagree  Alex Lago: Muletillas are not cliches, they are sounds, words or phrases you repeat a lot while you talk
5 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
avoid pet words/phrases


Explanation:
HTH, Muriel!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2009-02-16 03:44:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Some examples: "Incidentally," "Well," "So," "You know what I mean," etc.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 33 mins (2009-02-16 04:03:46 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Te copio la definición de la RAE:

2. f. Voz o frase que se repite mucho por hábito.

Sé que se trata de esto, porque en mis tiempos de secretaria organicé capacitación para vendedores jóvenes y uno de los temas era "cómo hilar una conversación sin usar muletillas".

Los visitadores médicos tienen que saber expresarse muy bien verbalmente, por lo que no dudo que tu texto se refiere a "pet words/phrases".

María Eugenia Wachtendorff
Chile
Local time: 08:43
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
Notes to answerer
Asker: Thanks, Maria Eugenia! You started the ball rolling in the right direction, and then Cinnamon came up with the linguistic term in English.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Adriana de Groote: De acuerdo, un cliché es otra cosa. Las muletillas son palabras o frases cortas que algunas personas usan constantemente al hablar.
59 mins

agree  ldfx
1 hr

agree  jmf: I think they are more commonly referred to as "fillers"/"filler phrases" in the US
2 hrs

agree  Soledad Caño
17 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
avoid commonplaces


Explanation:
Another option.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2009-02-16 04:42:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

A commonplace is a stock idea or expression which is frequently little more than the obvious, conventional, and easy thing to think or say on a given subject.

Example sentence(s):
  • Poets don't tell it like it is - so say most people. Ah, but they do! The way they tell it is the way ("like") it really is! They avoid ***commonplaces***.
Wilsonn Perez Reyes
El Salvador
Local time: 05:43
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  ldfx: also "threadbare words" could be an option
11 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
avoid using fillers


Explanation:
With thanks to María Eugenia.

Linguistically, this is what the type of words/phrases such as "you know, that is, I mean, er, well" etc.

Psychology of Language: Filler Words in Spoken Language
http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/1082645/psychology_...

Question: In English we have many "filler" words for when we don't know how to continue on in a sentence, ... In any case, in Spanish those "filler" words are called muletillas (or, less commonly, palabras de relleno) and are very common.
http://spanish.about.com/od/spanishvocabulary/a/filler_words...

In Spanish, fillers are called muletillas; some of the most common in American Spanish are e, este ("this") and o sea ("that is").
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filler_(linguistics)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2 hrs (2009-02-16 05:49:00 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Or "FILLER WORDS"
You can say "avoid using" or "avoid the use of". I prefer the former.

Filter out the filler words - Daily Report26 Oct 2007 ... Regardless of the language, filler words are universally seen as signs of uncertainty and even ignorance. In Russian, filler words are ...
www.dailyreportonline.com/Editorial/News/new_singleEdit.asp...

If your speech is peppered with pause fillers , it disrupts the enjoyment of your presentation and the appreciation of your message...
http://wekie.wordpress.com/2007/09/17/how-to-drastically-red...

Develop Command Of The Language4 Jan 2007 ... the ends of sentences so you won’t be tempted to use a filler word. ... Spend time improving your use of language and you will improve ...
www.speaking-tips.com/Articles/Develop-Command-Of-The-Langu...

Cinnamon Nolan
Spain
Local time: 13:43
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 16
Grading comment
I learned something new! Thanks to both you and Maria Eugenia
Notes to answerer
Asker: That is definitely the English word for what Maria Eugenia has described. I will leave the question open 24 hours, as that is always my policy, and see how many "agrees" you get.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  John Cutler: This was my first impression too. Also "words" like ah, um...
1 hr
  -> Thanks, John. :))

agree  Alex Lago
3 hrs
  -> Thanks, Alex. :->

agree  Marian Vieyra
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marian. :-)

agree  Mónica Alvarez: Si, estoy de acuerdo
13 hrs
  -> Muchas gracias. :->

agree  MartaHS: agree
18 hrs
  -> Thanks, Marta. :))

agree  Christian Nielsen-Palacios: ah..., ummm..., este..., like, y'know, I think you're right!
19 hrs
  -> Well, er... ya know, like, I mean, thanks! :-)
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Changes made by editors
Feb 18, 2009 - Changes made by Cinnamon Nolan:
Created KOG entryKudoZ term » KOG term


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