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barreras arquitectónicas

English translation: physical barriers

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:barreras arquitectónicas
English translation:physical barriers
Entered by: Rebecca Hendry
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14:44 Jul 27, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical: Health Care / Care for the elderly
Spanish term or phrase: barreras arquitectónicas
The text is about the features and facilities of an elderly care home:

"Carecen de barreras arquitectónicas y respiran alegría y luminosidad".

Am I right in thinking that this is to do with access for the disabled? I have found "architectural barriers" on google but I'm not altogether convinced.

Thanks in advance for all your help and suggestions,

Becky.
Rebecca Hendry
United Kingdom
Local time: 14:38
physical barriers
Explanation:
Rather than architectural or architectonic barriers, I believe they are called simply "physical barriers." If this is for a UK public, it appears that "physical barriers" is the expression used on both UK and EU government websites such as the ones shown below. 18,400 hits in Googles for "UK handicapped 'physical barriers'" and 18,000 hits for "UK disabled 'physical barriers'"

Overcome Physical Barriers to Access
Physical features of your premises can create barriers that make it impossible or very difficult for disabled people to access your goods or service.

A physical feature:

* is determined by the design or construction of the building
* forms part of the approach, entrance and/or exit to your premises
* can be fittings, fixtures, furniture, equipment, machinery or materials
* is any other physical element on your premises

Examples of physical features include:

* steps, stairways, kerbs
* floors and pavings
* doors and gates
* toilets and washing facilities
* lighting and ventilation

The aim is to overcome these barriers. (etc.)
www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/ detail?type=RESOURCES&itemId=1073792014

Part 3 of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) requires every business, large or small – from the local shop to restaurants, health clubs, dentists and supermarkets – to become more user-friendly to Britain’s 10 million disabled people. The law means that businesses will need to make reasonable changes – such as adapting premises, removing physical barriers or providing the service another way – so that disabled people can use the service. The change will affect over 2 million British businesses. Failure to act could result in legal action.
http://www.euroblind.org/fichiersGB/ukaccess.htm

From 1 October 2004 you may have to make reasonable adjustments to any physical barriers that may prevent disabled people using your service. Or you may have to provide your service by a reasonable alternative means, like bringing goods to the disabled person or helping them find items. There are some examples of the type of adjustments you could make below.
http://www.disability.gov.uk/dda/employers/providers.asp
Selected response from:

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 15:38
Grading comment
Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1physical barriersRebecca Jowers
5 +1architectural barriers
Giovanni Rengifo
4archictectural/ archetectonic barriers
David Hollywood


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
barreras arquitectónicas
archictectural/ archetectonic barriers


Explanation:
Either option seems to be the standard
....
Architectonic Barriers. The Tandem cooperative provides advice on the planning and design of accessible buildings and environments, the elimination of ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 7 mins (2005-07-27 14:51:53 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"architectonic\" sounds really like translatese but stranger things have happened :)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-07-27 14:52:31 GMT)
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Able to get about in a wheelchair: overcome the architectonic barriers of a city
by making ... To raise awareness of the architectonic barriers in cities. ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 8 mins (2005-07-27 14:53:09 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://es.geocities.com/proyectoabedul/poblaciones-eng.htm

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 mins (2005-07-27 14:53:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Disabled: facilities without architectonic barriers, 2 bathrooms fully adapted.\"
TITLE=\"Disabled: facilities without architectonic barriers, ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 10 mins (2005-07-27 14:54:23 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The choice of a means for overcoming architectonic barriers or going up and down
stairs at one\'s home can appear complex. The stairway climber is light and ...


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 11 mins (2005-07-27 14:55:55 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.tgr.it/en/sale_system.html

I think \"architectonic\" is getting its nose in front strange though it may sound :)

David Hollywood
Local time: 10:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 63
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

22 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
barreras arquitectónicas
architectural barriers


Explanation:
This is the term I heard at a conference I attended not long ago.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 26 mins (2005-07-27 15:10:20 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You´re right! It refers to \"obstacles\" that make it difficult for people with disabilities to enter/leave and move around in buildings/houses.

Giovanni Rengifo
Colombia
Local time: 08:38
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Muriel Vasconcellos: This is definitely the term being used.
2 days4 hrs
  -> Thank U Muriel. It seems they call it "physical barriers" in the UK
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

39 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
barreras arquitectónicas
physical barriers


Explanation:
Rather than architectural or architectonic barriers, I believe they are called simply "physical barriers." If this is for a UK public, it appears that "physical barriers" is the expression used on both UK and EU government websites such as the ones shown below. 18,400 hits in Googles for "UK handicapped 'physical barriers'" and 18,000 hits for "UK disabled 'physical barriers'"

Overcome Physical Barriers to Access
Physical features of your premises can create barriers that make it impossible or very difficult for disabled people to access your goods or service.

A physical feature:

* is determined by the design or construction of the building
* forms part of the approach, entrance and/or exit to your premises
* can be fittings, fixtures, furniture, equipment, machinery or materials
* is any other physical element on your premises

Examples of physical features include:

* steps, stairways, kerbs
* floors and pavings
* doors and gates
* toilets and washing facilities
* lighting and ventilation

The aim is to overcome these barriers. (etc.)
www.businesslink.gov.uk/bdotg/action/ detail?type=RESOURCES&itemId=1073792014

Part 3 of the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) requires every business, large or small – from the local shop to restaurants, health clubs, dentists and supermarkets – to become more user-friendly to Britain’s 10 million disabled people. The law means that businesses will need to make reasonable changes – such as adapting premises, removing physical barriers or providing the service another way – so that disabled people can use the service. The change will affect over 2 million British businesses. Failure to act could result in legal action.
http://www.euroblind.org/fichiersGB/ukaccess.htm

From 1 October 2004 you may have to make reasonable adjustments to any physical barriers that may prevent disabled people using your service. Or you may have to provide your service by a reasonable alternative means, like bringing goods to the disabled person or helping them find items. There are some examples of the type of adjustments you could make below.
http://www.disability.gov.uk/dda/employers/providers.asp

Rebecca Jowers
Spain
Local time: 15:38
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Many thanks.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jason Willis-Lee
1 day38 mins
  -> Thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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