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célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma

English translation: squamous cell carcinoma

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma
English translation:squamous cell carcinoma
Entered by: xxxElena Sgarbo
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15:43 Apr 4, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical / oncology
Spanish term or phrase: célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma
"Pacientes con cualquier malignidad presente o pasada (distinta a la extirpación fundamental o a la célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma)."

As in the previous question, this is one of the criteria to exclude subjects from a study of a drug for preventing rejection of transplanted organs.

My question has to do with this wording which seems odd to me. Would there be a particular reason why they say "squamous cells known as carcinoma" instead of "squamous cell carcinoma"?
GoodWords
Mexico
Local time: 05:49
squamous cell carcinoma
Explanation:
GoodWords,
Yes, you're right: "squamous cell carcinoma" is what I'd translate here.

Re: the original text, I keep thinking that this is a very poor back translation from English. In the paragraph "Pacientes con cualquier malignidad presente o pasada (distinta a la extirpación fundamental o a la célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma)."

... what they probably meant was:

"Pacientes con cualquier malignidad presente o pasada (distinta a la extirpación radical del carcinoma conocid como carcinoma de células escamosas."

Suerte!
Elena

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Note added at 2002-04-04 16:29:47 (GMT)
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oopps... no \"conocid\", sino \"conocido\".

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Note added at 2002-04-04 16:31:59 (GMT)
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Bertha: I\'m sorry, but I did read what you wrote. You may need to read it again yourself.
Selected response from:

xxxElena Sgarbo
Grading comment
Thanks for the helpful comments. I think the controversy showed the ambiguity of the original text. I am now convinced that the text is badly written, not that I'm dense for not understanding it. I'm leaving the other question based on this sentence open (see http://www.proz.com/kudoz/176591 for my reasons for doing so and further comments). Thanks to all who contributed.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2squamous cell carcinomaxxxElena Sgarbo
4 +2It is just the wording
Bertha S. Deffenbaugh
5In case a clarification is in order re: "squamous cells"....xxxElena Sgarbo


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
It is just the wording


Explanation:
"Squamous cells known as carcinoma" and "squamous cell carcinoma" are the same thing.

Regards,

BSD


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Note added at 2002-04-04 16:29:00 (GMT)
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SQUAMOUS CELLS KNOWN AS CARCINOMA = SQUAMOUS CELL CARCINOMA

I think Sgarbossa whould read before disagreeing. I never said squamous cells are the same as cancer.



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Note added at 2002-04-04 16:37:47 (GMT)
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Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Peter C. Fretz, B.S.
Jonathan H. Hughes, M.D., PhD
Peer Review Status: Internally Reviewed
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Squamous cell carcinoma is a common form of lung cancer, accounting for approximately one-third of all cases of bronchogenic carcinomas. Unlike adenocarcinoma, it is strongly linked with a history of cigarette smoking. Its histogenesis may be related to chronic inflammation and injury of the bronchial epithelium, which leads to replacement of the normal ciliated columnar epithelium by a squamous epithelium. This transformation from a glandular epithelium to squamous epithelium is known as squamous metaplasia.
Histological and cytological studies have revealed a series of changes that occur over many years and represent a morphologic progression to bronchogenic carcinoma. Early changes include a loss of the ciliated columnar epithelium, basal cell hyperplasia, and the formation of a low columnar epithelium without cilia. These changes are followed by a squamous metaplasia. As cellular atypia develops and advances there is progression through mild, moderate and severe dysplasia to carcinoma in situ. Carcinoma in situ has no metastatic potential. However, once carcinoma in situ penetrates the basement membrane to involve the lamina propria, it is invasive carcinoma and capable of widespread dissemination. These progressive changes are similar to those that proceed the development of squamous cell carcinoma in the uterine cervix. This progressive sequence would suggest that it would be possible to detect abnormalities that are linked to bronchogenic carcinoma. However, unlike the cervix, there is no convenient test, like the Papanicolaou smear, to monitor this progression. Nor is it possible to identify with certainty which lesions will progress to carcinoma.

Most squamous cell carcinomas arise centrally from either the main, lobar or segmental bronchi and ulcerate through the mucosa into the surrounding lung parenchyma. Their central location also tends to produces symptoms at an earlier stage than tumors located peripherally. Although symptoms tend not to be specific, most commonly a non-productive cough, they stem from the involvement of vital structures at the hilar area of the lung. Most patients, however, are detected by a routine chest radiograph, before they are symptomatic. Larger tumors are associated with chest pain, loss of appetite, loss of weight and dyspnea on exertion.

Despite the fact that squamous cell carcinomas are rare in the periphery, they can cause a characteristic radiographical and clinical syndrome. They are the most common cause of the Pancoast or superior sulcus syndrome.



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Note added at 2002-04-04 16:41:06 (GMT)
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Lo que quiero decir es que: squamous cell carcinomas y \" squamous cells carcinoma\" son dos diferentes formas lingüísticas de decir lo mismo.

KNOWN as carcinoma= conocido como CARCINOMA = también llamado carcinoma = carcinoma.

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Note added at 2002-04-04 17:09:40 (GMT)
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EJEMPLO DE USO DEL TéRMINO \"CONOCIDO COMO\":

MedicinaTV.com - Reportajes -
... El ictus cerebral, más conocido como infarto cerebral, presenta una sintomatología
difícil de reconocer en Atención Primaria. Este déficit en el ...
profesional.medicinatv.com/reportajes/infartocerebral/ - 20k




Bertha S. Deffenbaugh
United States
Local time: 03:49
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 219

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Patricia Fierro, M. Sc.
7 mins
  -> Gracias. :))

agree  Annette Flear
17 mins
  -> Gracias :))

disagree  xxxElena Sgarbo: Squamous cells are present in all normal people; carcinoma is not!
20 mins
  -> I DID NOT WRITE THAT.

agree  Karina Pelech: buen punto
1 hr
  -> Gracias. :)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
squamous cell carcinoma


Explanation:
GoodWords,
Yes, you're right: "squamous cell carcinoma" is what I'd translate here.

Re: the original text, I keep thinking that this is a very poor back translation from English. In the paragraph "Pacientes con cualquier malignidad presente o pasada (distinta a la extirpación fundamental o a la célula escamosa conocida como carcinoma)."

... what they probably meant was:

"Pacientes con cualquier malignidad presente o pasada (distinta a la extirpación radical del carcinoma conocid como carcinoma de células escamosas."

Suerte!
Elena

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-04 16:29:47 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

oopps... no \"conocid\", sino \"conocido\".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-04 16:31:59 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Bertha: I\'m sorry, but I did read what you wrote. You may need to read it again yourself.

xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539
Grading comment
Thanks for the helpful comments. I think the controversy showed the ambiguity of the original text. I am now convinced that the text is badly written, not that I'm dense for not understanding it. I'm leaving the other question based on this sentence open (see http://www.proz.com/kudoz/176591 for my reasons for doing so and further comments). Thanks to all who contributed.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Bertha S. Deffenbaugh: linguitics and medicine are not the same thing.
19 mins
  -> Of course they're not! And here, one does not need to be a linguist or a doctor to realize that "squamous cells known as carcinoma" is NOT the same as "squamous cell carcinoma"... All one needs to be is a good translator.

agree  José Luis Villanueva-Senchuk: Perdón a mi amor...que no se ponga celosa: Te quiero, Elena! Bravo! :-)) give me an E-an L-an E-an N-an A = ELENA!! :-))
46 mins
  -> JL, sos el presidente del club de hinchas de traductores médicos! ... gracias x el apoyo.

agree  Karina Pelech: although you too, Elena, are perfectly correct - as I am sure you, yourself, know.
54 mins
  -> ACB, "squamous cells known as cancer" could never be considered "It's just the wording" - unless you're trying to confuse your audience. It's not just the wording! There's an error in the wording. Anyway, gracias x el apoyo!!

agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
5 hrs
  -> Gracias colega
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
In case a clarification is in order re: "squamous cells"....


Explanation:
Squamous cells are normally present in human epithelium in the GYN and urinary tracts, the lungs, and many glands. If squamous cells degenerate, they may turn into cancer. But we all need squamous cells in our normal tissues.

Returning to your text, GoodWords, you're right in assuming that "squamous cells known as cancer" is wrong, in any context. It sounds like saying "skin cells known as cancer", or "glandular cells known as cancer".

Here are some med articles on the subject:
- Takeda Y. Yamamoto H. Epithelial hyperplasia of the extra-glandular excretory ducts of human minor salivary glands: a histopathologic study. Journal of Nihon University School of Dentistry. 39(3):147-53, 1997
….. The histologic features of normal and hyperplastic epithelia of the extra-glandular excretory ducts of human minor salivary glands were studied, and their pathologic significance evaluated. Normal duct epithelium consisted of two layers: inner columnar cells, and basal cubical or *squamous cells*……

- Gupta DK. Komaromy-Hiller G. Raab SS. Nath ME. Interobserver and intraobserver variability in the cytologic diagnosis of *normal* and abnormal metaplastic *squamous cells* in pap smears. Acta Cytologica. 45(5):697-703, 2001

- Pfeiffer D. Kimmig R. Herrmann J. Ruge M. Fisseler-Eckhoff A. Scheidel P. Jensen A. Schatz H. Pfeiffer A. Epidermal-growth-factor receptor correlates negatively with cell density in cervical *squamous epithelium* and is down-regulated in cancers of the human uterus. International Journal of Cancer. 79(1):49-55, 1998
…….(i) In normal cervical epithelium, EGFR levels per cell were high in non-dividing *squamous cells* of the upper layers of *normal* epithelium, where a mitogenic function of these EGFRs can be excluded...

- Walter FG. Gibly RL. Knopp RK. Roe DJ. *Squamous cells* as predictors of bacterial contamination in urine samples. Annals of Emergency Medicine. 31(4):455-8, 1998

- Grootendorst DC. Sont JK. Willems LN. Kluin-Nelemans JC. Van Krieken JH. Veselic-Charvat M. Sterk PJ. Comparison of inflammatory cell counts in asthma: induced sputum vs bronchoalveolar lavage and bronchial biopsies. Clinical & Experimental Allergy. 27(7):769-79, 1997
….. Sputum cell differentials were not different between the patients with and without inhaled steroids, and showed a median value of 19.4% *squamous cells*, with 1.0% eosinophils, 3.3% lymphocytes, 28.7% neutrophils, 49.4% macrophages and 6.9% cylindric epithelial cells (in percentage non-squamous cells)……


xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539
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