ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Medical

Se deja sonda de calibre 14 fijada por punto.

English translation: A 14 gauge probe fastened with suture was put in.

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Se deja sonda de calibre 14 fijada por punto.
English translation:A 14 gauge probe fastened with suture was put in.
Entered by: Henry Hinds
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

00:23 Apr 21, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical
Spanish term or phrase: Se deja sonda de calibre 14 fijada por punto.
Se introduce el...ilegible... hasta la estenosis. Dilatación- corte de la estenosis consiguiendo pasar a vegiga. *******Se deja sonda de calibre 14 fijada por punto.

Would this be a 14-calibre probe fixed by a suture/stitch????
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 07:51
A 14 gauge probe fastened with suture was put in.
Explanation:
I would say.
Selected response from:

Henry Hinds
Local time: 23:51
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +2A 14 gauge probe fastened with suture was put in.
Henry Hinds
5a 14 gauge catheter fixed at one end
Rita Damo
5ilegible: stent? catheter? cannula?
Karina Pelech
414-FR (genitourinary) catheter fixed / fastened with a single stitch
Leliadoura


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
A 14 gauge probe fastened with suture was put in.


Explanation:
I would say.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
Local time: 23:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26089
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
32 mins
  -> Gracias.

agree  Dr. Chrys Chrystello
1 hr
  -> Gracias.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
ilegible: stent? catheter? cannula?


Explanation:
you are right with your guess about the probe...

Suerte... :o)

Karina Pelech
Argentina
Local time: 02:51
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 975
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
14-FR (genitourinary) catheter fixed / fastened with a single stitch


Explanation:
Hola :)

Aunque en España les llamamos sondas, en realidad son catéteres (eso tubos que se introducen en la uretra y que van conectados a una bolsa de recogida de orina). El calibre se mide en unidades French (aunque muchas veces se omite porque se da por suspuesto, como en este caso).


"SIZING OF CATHETERS AND THEIR USES

sized on French scale according to diameter of lumen
urethral catheters range in size from 8-30
French ureteral catheters range in size from 3-14 French
size of catheter required depends on age and sex of patient
children generally require 8 or 10 FR urethral catheter
adults generally require 14 - 18 FR "

"Sondas KASTNER uretrales
K-73 Sonda uretral de doble vía, calibre 6 mm, 18 Fr.
K-75 Sonda uretral de doble vía, calibre 6,6 mm, 20 Fr.
K-77 Sonda uretral de doble vía, calibre 7,3 mm, 22 Fr.
K-79 Sonda uretral de doble vía, calibre 8,8 mm, 26 Fr.
K-92 Sonda uretral recta, calibre 2,8 mm, 8 Fr.
K-93 Sonda uretral recta, calibre 4 mm, 12 Fr.
K-94 Sonda uretral recta, calibre 5 mm, 14 Fr.
K-95 Sonda uretral recta, calibre 5,3 mm, 16 Fr.
K-96 Sonda uretral recta, calibre 6 mm, 18 Fr. "

Un saludo.




    Reference: http://www.tcjc.cc.tx.us/campus_ne/faculty/braziel/s1341gu.h...
    Reference: http://www.rivero.com.ar/public/productos/urologia/main.html
Leliadoura
Local time: 07:51
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 499
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
a 14 gauge catheter fixed at one end


Explanation:
Catheters can be used for a variety of reasons: for temporary or long-term treatment of urinary incontinence, to rest the bladder after surgery, to accurately measure the amount of urinary output, to instill medications, and to perform procedures. They are lubricated and inserted into the bladder using sterile techniques.

1. Catheters have an inflatable balloon at the end that keep them placed in the urinary bladder. The amount of sterile fluid that can be instilled into the balloon ranges from 5 to 30 cc. Smaller volumes (5-10 ml) are typically used; this helps prevent bladder spasms from pressure. Larger volumes are used in rare situations. Always follow the manufacturer's recommendations for the amount of sterile water to fill the balloon with, as over- or underfilling can deflect the cath tip and inhibit drainage. Always test the balloon for its ability to inflate/deflate before inserting it into a patient!
2. Catheters are sized on the "French" scale, abbreviated Fr. The higher the Fr number, the larger the catheter. Catheters range in size from single digit widths, used for children, to over 30 Fr. The smallest adult size is 14 Fr.
3. Unless otherwise contraindicated, fluids, up to three liters/day, should be encouraged. This will help preserve catheter patency and help to prevent infection. Preferred liquids are water, tea and juice. Carbonated beverages are discouraged, as they make the urine alkaline, predisposing to stone formation and bacterial growth.
4. Infection remains the most common problem associated with catheters. Signs & symptoms of infection include: fever and chills, leakage from around the cath insertion site, increased spasms of the legs, abdomen or bladder (mild, infrequent spasms are normal), burning of the urethra, penis or pubic area, nausea/vomiting, headache, aching in the low back or elsewhere, sediment or mucus in the urine or cloudy urine, bloody (pink or red) or foul-smelling urine, malaise, silver/hydrogel coated catheters have been shown to reduce the rate of nosocomial infection.
5. The catheter should be attached to the leg with a piece of tape or catheter holder to reduce tugging on the catheter from movement and to prevent trauma.
6. Patients should be taught to wash the peri area and cath insertion site with a clean soapy washcloth, removing any encrustations that may have formed, then rinsing with clean water and discarding the washcloth. This should be done with the daily shower. They should also be taught to wipe front to back with the bowel movement, to clean the peri area after each bowel movement, (disposable wipes can be used), and to avoid lotions or powders at the urethral meatus. Proper hand washing is a must! Antimicrobials are no longer recommended for use at the insertion site as they have not been shown to reduce infections.
7. Catheters are attached to drainage bags that collect the urine. There are two kinds - the overnight bag, which has a larger capacity and needs to be emptied about every eight hours, and the leg bag, which has a smaller capacity, but is more discreet, making patients more comfortable in public. If the patient is going to switch from one type of bag to another, the connections must be kept sterile. This can be done with a clean hands/no touch technique, or by swabbing the connections with alcohol or betadine, depending on facility preference. The drainage bag should always be kept below the level of the bladder to facilitate drainage and prevent reflux, but should not drag on the floor, to prevent infection. Leg bags should be strapped firmly to the leg but not so tight as to inhibit circulation. Bags should be cleansed with bleach between uses.
8. It is generally recommended that the catheter be changed every four weeks and the drainage bags be changed every week, but these time frame recommendations are not universal.
9. Collecting specimens from indwelling catheters is easy. Just clamp the drainage bag below the sample port (usually found just distal to its connection to the catheter) for about 15 minutes. Then, swab the port, use a sterile needle and syringe to remove the sample, and unclamp the drainage bag line.
10. Catheter removal is generally simple. Attach an empty syringe to the balloon port, and withdraw the volume of water instilled to fix it in place. Gently retract the catheter. The patient should void within four hours, and should be instructed to notify his health care provider if unable to do so. Slight burning and frequent urination after cath removal is normal.

Rita Damo
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in pair: 28
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: