KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Medical

"atropellamiento dejando lesiones"

English translation: struck/run over by a car resulting in soft-tissue lesions (bruises, cuts, abrasions, etc.)

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:atropellamiento dejando lesioness
English translation:struck/run over by a car resulting in soft-tissue lesions (bruises, cuts, abrasions, etc.)
Entered by: xxxR.J.Chadwick
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

04:21 Jul 5, 2002
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Medical
Spanish term or phrase: "atropellamiento dejando lesiones"
This term is found in a medical report. It states, "sufrio un accidente automovilistico en (la fecha) por atropellamiento dejando lesiones de tejidos blandos..."
Liz LaBorne
... run over and left with mild abrasions ...
Explanation:
"(S/he) was run over in an automobile accident which left him/her with mild abrasions"

Run over" is the usual term for what happens to a pedestrian in a traffic accident -- even when they have only been knocked down (i.e. not literally run over).

I assume that "tejidos blandos" refers to "mild (skin) abrasions".

Even though this is a fairly free translation I believe it may capture the intended sense of the original.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 23:15:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"bruise\" does not backtranslate as \"tejido\":-

bruise
1 (n)
(on person) cardenal m; moretón m esp LAm;
(on fruit) maca f; magulladura f;
2 (vt)
(leg etc) magullar; amoratar esp LAm;
(fruit) magullar; dañar;
(fig; feelings) herir;
3 (vi) I ~ easily
(lit) me salen cardenales {or} moretones con facilidad;
(fig) me siento herido por cualquier cosa;

-The Collins Concise Spanish Dictionary © 1998 HarperCollins Publishers




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 23:27:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I experience a certain embarrassment about this, because I now feel that \"tejido\" and \"tejido blando\" may be medical terms meant to cover any kind of light wound such as bruising, abrasion, etc.

There must be a native speaker of Spanish out there with medical/anatomical knowledge who can put their finger on this straight away.

\"Wounds\" in English connotes something more than a bruise or abrasion or small cut. But \"lesions\" in its medical sense is very general.

What about \"soft tissue lesions\"?
Selected response from:

xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 23:19
Grading comment
Thank you R.J. Chadwick!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +10... run over and left with mild abrasions ...xxxR.J.Chadwick
4 +2knocked down, leaving lesionsRowan Morrell
4 +2..struck by a vehicle, causing ... lesions...Sean Lyle
4... the impact/collision caused lesions of the soft tissues
Mirelluk
4with a shock leaving lesions
Thierry LOTTE
4 -2outrage outcomig in hurts
Alfarero


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): -2
outrage outcomig in hurts


Explanation:
or damage.

it's just an idea.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 04:29:06 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

or outrage resulting in injures

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 04:30:00 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

excuse me, it is injuries.

Alfarero
Local time: 11:19
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 29

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Rowan Morrell: "Outrage" really doesn't sound right in this context.
7 mins

disagree  Intergraf: not in this context...
1 hr

neutral  Maria-Jose Pastor: what???
1 day21 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
knocked down, leaving lesions


Explanation:
"Atropellar" can mean "to knock down" or "to run over". So I think that the person has been knocked down by a car, which has left some soft tissue lesions. Hence, I would translate this as "He/she was knocked down by an automobile on [date], leaving soft tissue lesions ..."


    Oxford Spanish (Spanish-English, English-Spanish) Dictionary
Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 03:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 339

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Karla Mabarak: yes--hit by a car
1 min

agree  Intergraf
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +10
... run over and left with mild abrasions ...


Explanation:
"(S/he) was run over in an automobile accident which left him/her with mild abrasions"

Run over" is the usual term for what happens to a pedestrian in a traffic accident -- even when they have only been knocked down (i.e. not literally run over).

I assume that "tejidos blandos" refers to "mild (skin) abrasions".

Even though this is a fairly free translation I believe it may capture the intended sense of the original.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 23:15:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

\"bruise\" does not backtranslate as \"tejido\":-

bruise
1 (n)
(on person) cardenal m; moretón m esp LAm;
(on fruit) maca f; magulladura f;
2 (vt)
(leg etc) magullar; amoratar esp LAm;
(fruit) magullar; dañar;
(fig; feelings) herir;
3 (vi) I ~ easily
(lit) me salen cardenales {or} moretones con facilidad;
(fig) me siento herido por cualquier cosa;

-The Collins Concise Spanish Dictionary © 1998 HarperCollins Publishers




--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-07-05 23:27:36 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I experience a certain embarrassment about this, because I now feel that \"tejido\" and \"tejido blando\" may be medical terms meant to cover any kind of light wound such as bruising, abrasion, etc.

There must be a native speaker of Spanish out there with medical/anatomical knowledge who can put their finger on this straight away.

\"Wounds\" in English connotes something more than a bruise or abrasion or small cut. But \"lesions\" in its medical sense is very general.

What about \"soft tissue lesions\"?


xxxR.J.Chadwick
Local time: 23:19
PRO pts in pair: 218
Grading comment
Thank you R.J. Chadwick!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Russell Gillis: or mild injuries
8 mins
  -> Thank you for your support

agree  elenali
38 mins
  -> Thank you

agree  Intergraf: or "hit by a car" in lieu of "run over" - I'd stick with "soft tissue lesions/injuries" though, since it doesn't say "abrasiones"...
1 hr
  -> You are probably right. Just what does "tejidos" mean here? "Abrasions" are superficial tissue wounds over a significant area -- as opposed to "cuts" for example.

agree  Sam D
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Sheila Hardie
5 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  xxxswani: run over by a car, leaving bruises
7 hrs
  -> Thank you for your comment -- but "bruise" does not back-translate as "tejido (blando)"

agree  Maria: yes, but agree with Intergraf, I would just leave it as "injuries" as it does not specify otherwise
8 hrs
  -> But it does specify the kind of wound -- i.e. "tejidos blandos"

agree  markaqui: lesiones can be as general as "injuries"
9 hrs
  -> Thank you for your comment -- except that the kind of injury is specified (i.e. "tejidos blandos"

agree  xxxx-Translator
10 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Guillermina Canale
10 hrs
  -> thank you

agree  Paul Mably
11 hrs
  -> thank you

disagree  Sean Lyle: "Tejido blando" should be translated directly into English as "soft tissue": I'll give a fuller answer below.
12 hrs
  -> I am inclined to agree with you (given further confirmation) -- thus by "soft tissue injuries" a generic meaning might be intended to cover "bruising", "abrasions" etc.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
with a shock leaving lesions


Explanation:
another solution

Thierry LOTTE
Local time: 17:19
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 67
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
... the impact/collision caused lesions of the soft tissues


Explanation:
or. In the impact/collision due to the car accident, the patient suffered lesions to the soft tissues.

Mirelluk
United Kingdom
Local time: 16:19
PRO pts in pair: 48
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

13 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
..struck by a vehicle, causing ... lesions...


Explanation:
...suffered a traffic accident on (date)in which he/she(?) was struck by a vehicle, causing soft tissue lesions...

"soft tissue" includes muscle and organs, (as in, for example, "soft tissue tumours") as opposed to bony structures, so the injuries could easily be life-threatening.

As this is a medical report the language is rather formal, hence I would go for "traffic accident", "struck", and "vehicle" in the translation.

As for the "atropello" bit, the action is almost any kind of violent, fast, irresistible force that pushes you out of your place or your own line of movement, either in fact or metaphorically, and you can even do it to people when you are on foot! If a car or vehicle hits you with sufficient force to give you lesions, you will probably fall over, so I think that "struck" covers the event sufficiently: "run over" and "knock down" feel too informal for me.

I would avoid "struck down", because that would sound too much like an act of God!

"dejar" doesn't have to be translated with too much of an idea of "leaving", because it is also used to mean "produce" or "yield", when talking, for example, about profits in a commercial context.


I hope all this verborrhoea helps!


Sean Lyle
Local time: 17:19
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 63

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: I agree with you -- you should get the points. What about "struck/run over by a car resulting in soft-tissue lesions"
5 hrs

agree  Maria-Jose Pastor
1 day7 hrs
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search