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cervicobraquialgias

English translation: cervical root pain

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:cervicobraquialgia
English translation:cervical root pain
Entered by: vivian
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21:25 Oct 17, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical
Spanish term or phrase: cervicobraquialgias
Afecciones que cursan con dolor y compromiso muscular.
Dorsalgias, lumbalgias, lumbociatalgias, cervicobraquialgias,tortícolis, fibromialgia, contracturas musculares aisladas; desgarros.
vivian
Argentina
Local time: 13:41
neck pain; brachialgia / cervical root pain; brachialgia
Explanation:
Vivian,
"Cervicobrachialgia" does exist, but it's a word mainly used in medical articles written by non-English speakers.

English speakers usually separate the 2 words and say either "cervical root pain" or simply "neck pain", and "brachialgia".

Good luck
Elena

Herniated intervertebral disc without pain. [Review] Journal - Oklahoma State Medical Association. 90(5):185-90, 1997 May-Jun.

Abstract
The diagnosis of herniated intervertebral disc is often made in cases of **radicular pain in** the low back, **the neck** , or sciatica or **brachialgia**. Practitioners often call upon radiologic imaging to confirm this diagnosis. But on radiologic examination, such a herniation may consist of a bulge, protrusion, prolapse, extension, extrusion or sequestration of this disc. We define and illustrate these terms from the literature. We then review the radiologic studies of normal controls, who have never had sciatica, **brachialgia** or **pain in the neck** or low back. In over one-quarter of these controls, studies using the plain x-ray, CT scan, myelogram, and MRI show various radiologic signs of a herniated intervertebral disc. We therefore recommend that practitioners should not exclusively rely on radiologic imaging to confirm the clinical diagnosis of a herniated intervertebral disc.
***********************************


The aim of the study was to compare the clinical signs of patients with **cervical** and lumbar **root affections**. METHODS: From January 1994 to January 1995, we performed a prospective study on 395 patients. The study comprised 93 patients with a **cervical** and 302 patients with a lumbar **root affection** . 338 patients underwent surgery. General data, case histories, and neurological findings were analyzed. RESULTS: The patients with **brachialgia** had a nonradicular pain radiation in 67%, the patients with sciatica only in 35%. All other data showed no significant differences. The investigation also shows that a radicular pain radiation is significantly correlated with an unequivocal radicular deficit. In particular, the patients with a cervical radicular pain radiation had a highly significant incidence of a radicular neurological deficit. CONCLUSIONS: We could demonstrate in this prospective study that only about one third of the patients with a cervical root affection showed an unequivocal radicular pain radiation. This contradicts the traditional medical textbook concept of a cervical root compression syndrome. This difference in respect of the clinical signs of lumbar and cervical root compressions might be explained by the anatomical variations of cervical root anastomoses. To determine the affected cervical root level, further investigation of the myotomes is recommended.
Selected response from:

xxxElena Sgarbo
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, although I will have to choose one!!!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5neck pain; brachialgia / cervical root pain; brachialgiaxxxElena Sgarbo
4cervical brachialgiaPeter Bagney


  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
cervical brachialgia


Explanation:
hth
After further injections the botulinum-toxin can even work up to a year.
Indication Myofascial cervical brachialgia with trigger points. ...
_


    www.orthopaede.com/uk/pdf/ procedures
Peter Bagney
Spain
Local time: 17:41
PRO pts in pair: 1017
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

14 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
neck pain; brachialgia / cervical root pain; brachialgia


Explanation:
Vivian,
"Cervicobrachialgia" does exist, but it's a word mainly used in medical articles written by non-English speakers.

English speakers usually separate the 2 words and say either "cervical root pain" or simply "neck pain", and "brachialgia".

Good luck
Elena

Herniated intervertebral disc without pain. [Review] Journal - Oklahoma State Medical Association. 90(5):185-90, 1997 May-Jun.

Abstract
The diagnosis of herniated intervertebral disc is often made in cases of **radicular pain in** the low back, **the neck** , or sciatica or **brachialgia**. Practitioners often call upon radiologic imaging to confirm this diagnosis. But on radiologic examination, such a herniation may consist of a bulge, protrusion, prolapse, extension, extrusion or sequestration of this disc. We define and illustrate these terms from the literature. We then review the radiologic studies of normal controls, who have never had sciatica, **brachialgia** or **pain in the neck** or low back. In over one-quarter of these controls, studies using the plain x-ray, CT scan, myelogram, and MRI show various radiologic signs of a herniated intervertebral disc. We therefore recommend that practitioners should not exclusively rely on radiologic imaging to confirm the clinical diagnosis of a herniated intervertebral disc.
***********************************


The aim of the study was to compare the clinical signs of patients with **cervical** and lumbar **root affections**. METHODS: From January 1994 to January 1995, we performed a prospective study on 395 patients. The study comprised 93 patients with a **cervical** and 302 patients with a lumbar **root affection** . 338 patients underwent surgery. General data, case histories, and neurological findings were analyzed. RESULTS: The patients with **brachialgia** had a nonradicular pain radiation in 67%, the patients with sciatica only in 35%. All other data showed no significant differences. The investigation also shows that a radicular pain radiation is significantly correlated with an unequivocal radicular deficit. In particular, the patients with a cervical radicular pain radiation had a highly significant incidence of a radicular neurological deficit. CONCLUSIONS: We could demonstrate in this prospective study that only about one third of the patients with a cervical root affection showed an unequivocal radicular pain radiation. This contradicts the traditional medical textbook concept of a cervical root compression syndrome. This difference in respect of the clinical signs of lumbar and cervical root compressions might be explained by the anatomical variations of cervical root anastomoses. To determine the affected cervical root level, further investigation of the myotomes is recommended.


xxxElena Sgarbo
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3539
Grading comment
Thanks a lot, although I will have to choose one!!!
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