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Neo-melubrina

English translation: Metamizole /or dipyrone

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:Neo-melubrina
English translation:Metamizole /or dipyrone
Entered by: Taña Dalglish
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00:40 Aug 9, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general) / Focus Group on a new medication
Spanish term or phrase: Neo-melubrina
Quisiera que me ayudaran con el nombre del medicamento en inglés?
kairosz (Mary Guerrero)
Mexico
Local time: 00:57
Metamizole /or dipyrone
Explanation:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/109/6...
Metamizole, or dipyrone, is a pyrazolone nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent.1 It has been associated with fatal agranulocytosis and was withdrawn from the US market by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1979.1 Metamizole is available without a prescription in Mexico and other countries and is used to treat fever and pain. It is marketed in Latin America under hundreds of brand names, including Neo-melubrina (Table 1). Despite the common use of metamizole in other countries and warnings issued in the United States to travelers regarding the risks of medications that contain pyrazolone analgesics,2 many US physicians remain unaware of these potentially harmful medications.

HTH!

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Note added at 59 mins (2007-08-09 01:39:45 GMT)
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Also see: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/851655


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Note added at 1 hr (2007-08-09 01:47:57 GMT)
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http://www.answers.com/topic/metamizole
metamizole
Should not be confused with methimazole .
Metamizole sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), commonly used in the past as a powerful painkiller and fever reducer. It is better known under the names Dipyrone, Analgin and Novalgin.
Metamizole was first synthesized by the German company Hoechst AG in 1920, and its mass production started in 1922. It remained freely available worldwide until the 1970s, when it was discovered that the drug carries a small risk of causing agranulocytosis - a very dangerous and potentially fatal condition. Recent studies estimate that the incidence rate of metamizole-induced agranulocytosis is between 0.2 and 2 cases per million person days of use, with approximately 7% of all cases fatal (provided that all patients have access to urgent medical care). In other words, one should expect 50 to 500 deaths annually due to metamizole in a country of 300 million, assuming that every citizen takes the drug once a month. This is not a very high rate compared to other drugs - for example, the prescription drug clozapine is known to be at least 50 times more likely to trigger agranulocytosis. However, at the time the risk was assumed to be much greater [1] and, as such, excessive for an over-the-counter analgesic, especially considering the existence of safer alternatives (aspirin and ibuprofen).
Metamizole was banned in Sweden in 1974, in the United States in 1977; more than 30 countries, including Japan, Australia, Iran, and part of the European Union, have followed suit. In these countries metamizole is still occasionally used as a veterinary drug. In Germany it became a prescription drug. Some European pharmaceutical companies, notably Hoechst and Merck, continue to develop metamizole-containing drugs and market them in some countries. In Sweden, the ban was lifted in 1995 and re-introduced in 1999.
In other parts of the world (notably in Spain, Mexico, India, Brazil, Russia, Bulgaria, Israel and Third World countries) metamizole is still freely available over-the-counter, remains one of the most popular analgesics, and plays an important role in self-medication. For example, metamizole and metamizole-containing drugs account for 80% of OTC analgesic market in Russia, whereas ibuprofen accounts for 2.5%. In Brazil, metamizole (Novalgina) products, although over-the-counter, carry warnings to avoid usage by those under 19 years old, and have several informations about early detection and treatment of agranulocytosis. Although the Brazilian government did not push for a ban on the drug, its use has seen a huge decline on the past years as pharmaceutical companies and doctors pushed aspirin, paracetamol and ibuprofen based products as replacement. The most widely available metamizole-containing product still in use in Brazil is Buscopan Plus (under the name of Buscopan Composto).
Metamizole received brief period of attention by American media in 2001[2], when a Latino immigrant boy was admitted into a Salt Lake City clinic with symptoms of agranulocytosis. It was discovered that the drug remained freely available in Latino shops and highly popular among Mexican immigrants, despite the ban. The ongoing "LATIN" Study, a multicenter international case-control study, is examining the incidence of agranulocytosis in Latin America and the role of metamizole.
Brand names
• Mexico: Neo-Melubrina
• Brazil: Novalgina
• Germany: Novalgin, Analgin, Berlosin, Metalgin, Metamizol-Puren, Novaminsulfon.
• Hungary: Algopyrin
• Romania: Algocalmin, Novocalmin, Algozone, Nevralgin
• Spain: Nolotil
• Russia/Bulgaria: Tempalgin (combination drug; metamizole is one of its components)
• Israel: Optalgin
• Finland: Litalgin
• Bulgaria: Proalgin,Analgin
• Venezuela: Novalcina
• Macedonia: Analgin
References
1. ^ WHO Pharmaceuticals Newsletter No. 1, 2002, p.15
^ Metamizole Use by Latino Immigrants: A Common and Potentially Harmful Home Remedy
Selected response from:

Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Local time: 00:57
Grading comment
Muchas gracias, Taña
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4Metamizole /or dipyrone
Taña Dalglish


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Metamizole /or dipyrone


Explanation:
http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/cgi/content/full/109/6...
Metamizole, or dipyrone, is a pyrazolone nonsteroidal antiinflammatory agent.1 It has been associated with fatal agranulocytosis and was withdrawn from the US market by the US Food and Drug Administration in 1979.1 Metamizole is available without a prescription in Mexico and other countries and is used to treat fever and pain. It is marketed in Latin America under hundreds of brand names, including Neo-melubrina (Table 1). Despite the common use of metamizole in other countries and warnings issued in the United States to travelers regarding the risks of medications that contain pyrazolone analgesics,2 many US physicians remain unaware of these potentially harmful medications.

HTH!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 59 mins (2007-08-09 01:39:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Also see: http://www.proz.com/kudoz/851655


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-08-09 01:47:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.answers.com/topic/metamizole
metamizole
Should not be confused with methimazole .
Metamizole sodium is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), commonly used in the past as a powerful painkiller and fever reducer. It is better known under the names Dipyrone, Analgin and Novalgin.
Metamizole was first synthesized by the German company Hoechst AG in 1920, and its mass production started in 1922. It remained freely available worldwide until the 1970s, when it was discovered that the drug carries a small risk of causing agranulocytosis - a very dangerous and potentially fatal condition. Recent studies estimate that the incidence rate of metamizole-induced agranulocytosis is between 0.2 and 2 cases per million person days of use, with approximately 7% of all cases fatal (provided that all patients have access to urgent medical care). In other words, one should expect 50 to 500 deaths annually due to metamizole in a country of 300 million, assuming that every citizen takes the drug once a month. This is not a very high rate compared to other drugs - for example, the prescription drug clozapine is known to be at least 50 times more likely to trigger agranulocytosis. However, at the time the risk was assumed to be much greater [1] and, as such, excessive for an over-the-counter analgesic, especially considering the existence of safer alternatives (aspirin and ibuprofen).
Metamizole was banned in Sweden in 1974, in the United States in 1977; more than 30 countries, including Japan, Australia, Iran, and part of the European Union, have followed suit. In these countries metamizole is still occasionally used as a veterinary drug. In Germany it became a prescription drug. Some European pharmaceutical companies, notably Hoechst and Merck, continue to develop metamizole-containing drugs and market them in some countries. In Sweden, the ban was lifted in 1995 and re-introduced in 1999.
In other parts of the world (notably in Spain, Mexico, India, Brazil, Russia, Bulgaria, Israel and Third World countries) metamizole is still freely available over-the-counter, remains one of the most popular analgesics, and plays an important role in self-medication. For example, metamizole and metamizole-containing drugs account for 80% of OTC analgesic market in Russia, whereas ibuprofen accounts for 2.5%. In Brazil, metamizole (Novalgina) products, although over-the-counter, carry warnings to avoid usage by those under 19 years old, and have several informations about early detection and treatment of agranulocytosis. Although the Brazilian government did not push for a ban on the drug, its use has seen a huge decline on the past years as pharmaceutical companies and doctors pushed aspirin, paracetamol and ibuprofen based products as replacement. The most widely available metamizole-containing product still in use in Brazil is Buscopan Plus (under the name of Buscopan Composto).
Metamizole received brief period of attention by American media in 2001[2], when a Latino immigrant boy was admitted into a Salt Lake City clinic with symptoms of agranulocytosis. It was discovered that the drug remained freely available in Latino shops and highly popular among Mexican immigrants, despite the ban. The ongoing "LATIN" Study, a multicenter international case-control study, is examining the incidence of agranulocytosis in Latin America and the role of metamizole.
Brand names
• Mexico: Neo-Melubrina
• Brazil: Novalgina
• Germany: Novalgin, Analgin, Berlosin, Metalgin, Metamizol-Puren, Novaminsulfon.
• Hungary: Algopyrin
• Romania: Algocalmin, Novocalmin, Algozone, Nevralgin
• Spain: Nolotil
• Russia/Bulgaria: Tempalgin (combination drug; metamizole is one of its components)
• Israel: Optalgin
• Finland: Litalgin
• Bulgaria: Proalgin,Analgin
• Venezuela: Novalcina
• Macedonia: Analgin
References
1. ^ WHO Pharmaceuticals Newsletter No. 1, 2002, p.15
^ Metamizole Use by Latino Immigrants: A Common and Potentially Harmful Home Remedy


Taña Dalglish
Jamaica
Local time: 00:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 128
Grading comment
Muchas gracias, Taña
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Changes made by editors
Aug 10, 2007 - Changes made by Taña Dalglish:
Edited KOG entry<a href="/profile/22218">kairosz (Mary Guerrero)'s</a> old entry - "Neo-melubrina" » "Metamizole /or dipyrone"


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