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vitopresión en tronco

English translation: diascopy

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:vitopresión en tronco
English translation:diascopy
Entered by: treychic
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22:28 Oct 29, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Medical - Medical (general)
Spanish term or phrase: vitopresión en tronco
Hola ProZistas!

El contexto de un informe alta:
Piel: lesiones puntiformes que desaparecen a la vitopresión en tronco, sobretodo en zona escote.

Algunas ideas?

Gracias de antemano por toda la ayuda,
t r e y
treychic
Local time: 16:26
diascopy
Explanation:
This examination is known as diascopy in fact.
http://www.dermatologyinfo.net/english/chapters/chapter04.ht...

Diascopy

Diascopy is a simple procedure which will sometimes provide useful additional information for diagnosis of certain skin diseases such as in lupus vulgaris that shows distinctive yellowish, reddish brown apple jelly nodules.

A glass slide or a clear plastic tongue depressor is pressed firmly on the lesion. The temporary exclusion of blood clearly reveals the presence and sometimes the probable nature of dermal changes.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2007-10-30 07:52:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec10/ch109/ch109c.html

Diascopy: Diascopy is used to distinguish between hemorrhagic and inflammatory lesions. A microscope slide is pressed against a lesion to see whether it blanches. Hemorrhagic lesions (petechiae or purpura) do not blanch; inflammatory lesions do. Diascopy is sometimes used to distinguish epidermal lesions from dermal nodules; epidermal lesions disappear, while dermal nodules remain and may turn an “apple jelly” color.

Selected response from:

Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 01:26
Grading comment
Thanks so much, Sue! Amazing as ever!
t r e y
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +3diascopyDr Sue Levy
4 +4vitropressure in trunk
celiacp


  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
vitropressure in trunk


Explanation:
.

celiacp
Spain
Local time: 01:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 463

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  rdom: Yes, it´s vitropressure because there was a typo in the original (it should have been "vitropresión"). Personally I would prefer "torso", I feel it´s more usual.
2 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Rita Tepper
4 mins
  -> thanks!

agree  Paulo César Mendes MD, CT
52 mins
  -> gracias!!

agree  Dr Sue Levy: on the trunk/torso
8 hrs
  -> thanks, Sue!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +3
vitopresión
diascopy


Explanation:
This examination is known as diascopy in fact.
http://www.dermatologyinfo.net/english/chapters/chapter04.ht...

Diascopy

Diascopy is a simple procedure which will sometimes provide useful additional information for diagnosis of certain skin diseases such as in lupus vulgaris that shows distinctive yellowish, reddish brown apple jelly nodules.

A glass slide or a clear plastic tongue depressor is pressed firmly on the lesion. The temporary exclusion of blood clearly reveals the presence and sometimes the probable nature of dermal changes.



--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 9 hrs (2007-10-30 07:52:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

http://www.merck.com/mmpe/sec10/ch109/ch109c.html

Diascopy: Diascopy is used to distinguish between hemorrhagic and inflammatory lesions. A microscope slide is pressed against a lesion to see whether it blanches. Hemorrhagic lesions (petechiae or purpura) do not blanch; inflammatory lesions do. Diascopy is sometimes used to distinguish epidermal lesions from dermal nodules; epidermal lesions disappear, while dermal nodules remain and may turn an “apple jelly” color.



Dr Sue Levy
Local time: 01:26
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 362
Grading comment
Thanks so much, Sue! Amazing as ever!
t r e y

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  liz askew
5 mins

agree  JEAN HUTCHINGS
35 mins

agree  brainfloss: Exactly and as a matter of fact, in Spanish, "vitropresión" is also known as "diascopía". Follow this link from Universidad de Valencia: http://www.uv.es/derma/CLindex/CLsemiologia/CLsemiologia.htm...
8 hrs
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