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ingrata

English translation: ungrateful girl/woman

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:ingrata
English translation:ungrateful girl/woman
Entered by: Jack Doughty
Options:
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17:56 Feb 28, 2002
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: ingrata
eres una ingrata
gloria
You are an ungrateful girl/woman
Explanation:
The word "ingrate" does exist in English, but it is very rare - so rare that it is not included in my Illustrated Oxford Dictionary (187,000 words). You would simply say "You are ungrateful" or more likely "You are an ungrateful(something)" for more emphasis - the noun would probably be derogatory: "ungrateful wretch", "ungrateful bastard" etc.
Selected response from:

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:01
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +8You are an ungrateful girl/woman
Jack Doughty
4 +6an ingrate
Parrot
5 +1ungrateful wretch
Henry Hinds
5ingrateJohn Kinory
4 +1unappreciative
Berni Armstrong
5thankless, ungrateful
Rafa Lombardino


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +6
an ingrate


Explanation:
"You are an ingrate".
But: Tarea ingrata = thankless task

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 11:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  JH Trads
1 min

agree  Tatiana Neroni
1 min

agree  Kim Metzger
12 mins

agree  Elvira Stoianov
15 mins

agree  John Kinory
5 hrs

agree  xxxtazdog
11 hrs
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16 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +8
You are an ungrateful girl/woman


Explanation:
The word "ingrate" does exist in English, but it is very rare - so rare that it is not included in my Illustrated Oxford Dictionary (187,000 words). You would simply say "You are ungrateful" or more likely "You are an ungrateful(something)" for more emphasis - the noun would probably be derogatory: "ungrateful wretch", "ungrateful bastard" etc.

Jack Doughty
United Kingdom
Local time: 10:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 103
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  MJ Barber
13 mins

agree  Olga Simon
14 mins

agree  Anaviva
1 hr

agree  LEALZ
2 hrs

agree  Henry Hinds: I also agree, of course.
3 hrs

agree  Felipe Castillo Ruiz
5 hrs

neutral  John Kinory: Interesting: my one-volume Collins lists it, though it makes unkind noises about modern usage. Much as I like it, I disagree: I have seen it used in recent times. Maybe Oxford is just an old-fashioned place?
5 hrs
  -> I was surprised not to find it. I've seen it in books (60 years old or more) but it's not contemporary usage.

agree  Andrea Kaplan: I like ungrateful
8 hrs

agree  Regina Motta
19 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
unappreciative


Explanation:
or inconsiderate,
might be two more options.

Berni Armstrong
Local time: 11:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 71

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LEALZ
34 mins
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ungrateful wretch


Explanation:
Yes "wretch". That follows it nicely. "Ingrate" is correct but not too common. This was also posed recently; I don't think I got the points, but I offer it again. You might check to see if you can find some of the replies from before, or at least the one that got the points.
Yes, in Spanish it's fairly strong, at least in our part of the world.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-02-28 21:26:37 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Jack\'s reply, of course, is quite good.


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 03:01
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxR.J.Chadwick: Yes, as an exclamation Collins Spanish Dictionary has "Wretch!" for "Ingrato!"
11 hrs
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8 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
thankless, ungrateful


Explanation:
As a reference, I may use that song sung by the Mexican group Café Tacuba: "Ingrata, no me digas que me quieres / Que sin mi que estás murriendo / Que tus lágrimas son falsas / Tu desprecias mis palavras / Solo quieres humillarme / Ingrata..."

Rafa Lombardino
United States
Local time: 02:01
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 227

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  John Kinory: How is that a reference?
3 hrs
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12 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
ingrate


Explanation:
I have been told that my comments below Jack Doughty's answer are confused and confusing. I agree. For one thing, there are too many vague pronouns. Blame it on the late hour, blame it on these **** fiddly little boxes. What I meant to say, was:
Interesting: my one-volume Collins lists 'ingrate', though it makes unkind noises about modern usage. Much as I like Collins, I disagree: I have seen 'ingrate' used in recent times. Maybe Oxford is just an old-fashioned place.

John Kinory
Local time: 10:01
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