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robarse una chica

English translation: they eloped

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15:23 Mar 26, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: robarse una chica
en un contexto rural se habla de un joven que "se robó" a una chica y tuvo que casarse con ella después. ¿Cuál término usarían?... Gracias
Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
Local time: 16:40
English translation:they eloped
Explanation:
This is one possibility, Luiroi, but means that they took this action consentually, mutually (which I suspect is many times the case.)

Let's see how the others interpret it!

Saludos!

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Note added at 2002-03-26 15:28:53 (GMT)
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Webster says: \'elope\'= to run away secretly; especially to leave one\'s home to marry a lover; to run away, to abscond.\"

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Note added at 2002-03-26 15:37:41 (GMT)
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Believe it or not, in some rural Latin American areas where I\'ve lived, this expression is still used frequently. If someone asks if a young couple is married, a very common response could be, \"No, él se la robó de su casa.\" This literally means that they saw one another on the sly for a while, and later they \'absconded,\' or \'eloped,\' but the MAN is the one who \'robbed\' in this case. Since your context specifically mentioned rural, I thought immediately of this scenario.

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Note added at 2002-03-26 16:01:52 (GMT)
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You could simply say, he eloped with her. It conveys the precise sentiments of \"taking off with a girl.\"
Selected response from:

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 17:40
Grading comment
A tough decision to make... Thank you all... all your ideas were very enlightening!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +1elope
Dr. Chrys Chrystello
4 +2deflowerJH Trads
4 +2they eloped
Bill Greendyk
4 +1abductSandra Schlatter
4 +1por qué no mantener el uso de "robar" en inglés?Aurora Humarán
4raped
Joseph Rosacena
4took advantage of a girlSheilann
4kidnap
Ligia Dias Costa


  

Answers


1 min   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
kidnap


Explanation:
i have my doubts

Ligia Dias Costa
Portugal
Local time: 22:40
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 49
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
they eloped


Explanation:
This is one possibility, Luiroi, but means that they took this action consentually, mutually (which I suspect is many times the case.)

Let's see how the others interpret it!

Saludos!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-26 15:28:53 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Webster says: \'elope\'= to run away secretly; especially to leave one\'s home to marry a lover; to run away, to abscond.\"

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-26 15:37:41 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Believe it or not, in some rural Latin American areas where I\'ve lived, this expression is still used frequently. If someone asks if a young couple is married, a very common response could be, \"No, él se la robó de su casa.\" This literally means that they saw one another on the sly for a while, and later they \'absconded,\' or \'eloped,\' but the MAN is the one who \'robbed\' in this case. Since your context specifically mentioned rural, I thought immediately of this scenario.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-03-26 16:01:52 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You could simply say, he eloped with her. It conveys the precise sentiments of \"taking off with a girl.\"

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 17:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 527
Grading comment
A tough decision to make... Thank you all... all your ideas were very enlightening!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Ligia Dias Costa: consentually? I did not interpret it like that1
0 min
  -> No, you're right, it's not known from the context. Still, I doubt that the 'chica' sat like a rag doll while this boy 'robbed' her. In colloquial language, even the word robbed here could mean that he took of with her, but not against her wishes. :-))

neutral  JH Trads: same idea as Ligia, the wording is not of consensus in the original text :-)
42 mins
  -> OK, thanks Hugo. But in the context of my note above, I have personal friends who've told me they've 'robado' their wives. That tells me they're not married officially, but I know for sure the girl wasn't dragged away against her wishes. :-))))

agree  yolanda Speece: I went through that culture shock when I was a child so I know of which you speak. It was confusing to me then. He took her w/o her parents' consent
2 hrs
  -> Thanks, southpaw. At least someone agrees! :-))

agree  Aurora Humarán: Bill, creo que me convenciste.
1 day4 hrs
  -> Bueno, es un honor para mí, Au! :-))
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
abduct


Explanation:
maybe this would fit?

Sandra Schlatter
Local time: 22:40
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Maria-Teresa Zenteno: Estoy de acuerdo, porque indica que la chica es menor de edad y no tiene el consentimiento de los padres
5 hrs
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4 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
deflower


Explanation:
meaning depriving of virginity

I think it fits here

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Note added at 2002-03-26 15:30:06 (GMT)
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se \"robó\" su virginidad/\"inocencia\"

HTH

JH Trads
United States
Local time: 16:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 908

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  lcmolinari: Yes, I think this fits. If he had kidnapped or abducted her, he would not have had to marry her (tuvo que casarse...)
11 mins
  -> thanks Laura :-)

agree  Teresa Duran-Sanchez: Esto es
28 mins
  -> thanks Cidcampeador :-)

neutral  Bill Greendyk: But speaking in a rural context, this would be a word practically unheard of in colloquial speech! Sounds more formal.
35 mins
  -> thanks william, no deja de ser importante entender el verdadero significado para no hacer contrasentidos, además depende de cual zona rural del vasto mundo de habla inglesa se trata :-) :-)

neutral  Aurora Humarán: humm... no sabemos, tal vez la violó pero ella no era virgen...qué cosa la traducción no???
5 hrs
  -> quizás..quizás..quizas.... :-))
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8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
took advantage of a girl


Explanation:
I think it's as euphemistic as the original. And there's no mention of leaving the village.

Sheilann
Spain
Local time: 23:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 886
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20 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
por qué no mantener el uso de "robar" en inglés?


Explanation:
En español no es común escuchar que se hable de "andar robando chicas" así que es bastante metafórica la frase.
Yo mantendría la metáfora....


steal or rob? que opine un native speaker! aurora


Aurora Humarán
Argentina
Local time: 18:40
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 395

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bill Greendyk: I don't know, Aurora, I never heard of 'robbing' a girl, even in the kidnapping sense. :-))
7 mins
  -> En español tampoco I never heard of "robar" una chica. Se roban gallinas, vacas pero no chicas.... por eso sugiero mantener el ROBAR.... =) cómo andás Bill?

agree  Paul Edgar: I totally agree Aurora...I think all the other options imply things that we can only suppose exist, and keeping the idea of the original, which as you say is not common in Spanish, is a good compromise.
5 hrs
  -> gracias Paul
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
elope


Explanation:
only this term reflects the original

Dr. Chrys Chrystello
Portugal
Local time: 21:40
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bill Greendyk: I feel the same way.
2 mins

neutral  JH Trads: the wording is not of consensus in the original text :-)
9 mins
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
raped


Explanation:
I think in this context, it's appropiate to use this word since the girl has no other option than to marry the man after what has been done.

Joseph Rosacena
Local time: 23:40
Native speaker of: Native in TagalogTagalog, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 9

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maria-Teresa Zenteno: Well...it seems that there is consent from the girl, but not from the parents...so I don't think it is the same
2 hrs
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