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usted

English translation: Let's see if you like my suggestion...

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00:16 Apr 3, 2002
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: usted
-¿Usted siguió dando clase?
-No me trates más de usted.
-¿Seguiste dando clase?
Magali Estela
English translation:Let's see if you like my suggestion...
Explanation:
Like my colleague just said, you can translate usted - it just doesn't exist in english. In english is just you and you.

So, the only way, is changing a bit the structure of the sentence without loosing the idea.

In this sense, my suggestion is as follows:

- Mr./Mrs. X, have you continued* giving classes?
- You don't have to be so formal with me.
- You went on giving classes?


* you can change "continued" to another synonym, according to the spirit of the conversation (i don't know the tone of the back dialogues..., so just pick)

synonyms CONTINUE, ENDURE, ABIDE, PERSIST - they all mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely.

CONTINUE applies to a process going on without ending
<the search for peace will continue>.

ENDURE adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies
<in spite of everything, her faith endured>.

ABIDE implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability
<a love that abides through 40 years of marriage>.

PERSIST suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness
<the sense of guilt persisted>.


This examples were picked from Merriam-Webster Dictionary.


Hope it helps...
Selected response from:

poulson
United Kingdom
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +4Let's see if you like my suggestion...poulson
5 +4Look here...
Henry Hinds
4 +2Did you continue giving classes, SIR/MADAM?Andrew Donaldson
4 +2for Thierry...
Parrot
5you
Berry Prinsen
4 +1untranslatable in english
Thierry LOTTE
4 +1pls read below
laurab
4 +1You
Trudy Peters


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
You


Explanation:
as simple as that.

Trudy Peters
United States
Local time: 21:57
Native speaker of: Native in GermanGerman, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 341

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Thierry LOTTE: Are you joking trudy ????
2 mins
  -> All she asked for is "usted." And that means "you" no matter how you look at it.

agree  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: more homework?
9 mins
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
untranslatable in english


Explanation:
I leave it to my colleagues to explain why.....
My knowledge of english language is not sufficient to give you an explanation but I am very very interested by their solution.....

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Note added at 2002-04-03 00:20:52 (GMT)
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In French I could make it because \"El matiz\" does exists....

Thierry LOTTE
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in pair: 67

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Parrot: See below
26 mins
  -> Merci Cecilia
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25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
pls read below


Explanation:
It is You, but formal. You can add Mr/Mrs if you want, and then drop it and simply call someone by their name. That's the only way I can think of to make the difference between Usted and tu.
Saludos
Laura

laurab
Mexico
Local time: 20:57
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
PRO pts in pair: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Anne-Carine Zimmer: yes, that's it, and is exactly the approach Henry demonstrated below. Great idea.
4 hrs
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27 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
for Thierry...


Explanation:
It should be "You", (2nd person singular) but that were "VOS" (el argentino), whereas "tu" (2nd person singular) is "you" in English (which is also really a 2nd person plural) the 2nd person singular in English "thee" today is only used to talk to God. (Do you?)
So ... "vous" les français gagnez ce point!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 00:52:34 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

logique de perroquet

Parrot
Spain
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 7645

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thierry LOTTE: merci Cecilia ! tu es tres forte mais en tant que Francais je ne gagne rien... en tant que traducteur je perd "tout" car je n'ai pas de bonne reponse á proposer,,,,
15 mins

agree  Aurora Humarán: petit fours...
1 hr
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31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Let's see if you like my suggestion...


Explanation:
Like my colleague just said, you can translate usted - it just doesn't exist in english. In english is just you and you.

So, the only way, is changing a bit the structure of the sentence without loosing the idea.

In this sense, my suggestion is as follows:

- Mr./Mrs. X, have you continued* giving classes?
- You don't have to be so formal with me.
- You went on giving classes?


* you can change "continued" to another synonym, according to the spirit of the conversation (i don't know the tone of the back dialogues..., so just pick)

synonyms CONTINUE, ENDURE, ABIDE, PERSIST - they all mean to exist over a period of time or indefinitely.

CONTINUE applies to a process going on without ending
<the search for peace will continue>.

ENDURE adds an implication of resisting destructive forces or agencies
<in spite of everything, her faith endured>.

ABIDE implies stable and constant existing especially as opposed to mutability
<a love that abides through 40 years of marriage>.

PERSIST suggests outlasting the normal or appointed time and often connotes obstinacy or doggedness
<the sense of guilt persisted>.


This examples were picked from Merriam-Webster Dictionary.


Hope it helps...

poulson
United Kingdom
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 8
Grading comment
Graded automatically based on peer agreement. KudoZ.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Thierry LOTTE: Waow ! What a nice translation ! I am jealous....
14 mins
  -> :) Tu me fais toujours sourrir, Thierry!

agree  Terry Burgess: Excellent detail!!
10 hrs
  -> thank you, Terry!

agree  Cecilia Paris
11 hrs
  -> thankx.

agree  CNF: great options
15 hrs
  -> thank you!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
Look here...


Explanation:
Did you continue teaching, Mr. Brown?
Don't call me mister, just call me Dan.
Did you continue teaching, Dan?

Just give 'em a name and the problem is solved.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-04-03 01:40:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ojalá que después recojan las plumas...


    Exp.
Henry Hinds
United States
Local time: 19:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 26512

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Trudy Peters: Love it!!
6 mins
  -> Glad you made it all the way to the bottom! Thanks!

agree  Nora Escoms
1 hr
  -> También agradezco tu apoyo!

agree  CNF: great options, too
14 hrs

agree  Kathryn Guttromson: or "Don't be so formal, just call me Dan."
20 hrs
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7 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Did you continue giving classes, SIR/MADAM?


Explanation:
Sir and Madam are formal expressions. It would help to avoid adding names which are not in the original text.


Did you continue giving classes, SIR/MADAM?
You need not be so formal/don't need to be so formal.
So did you carry on giving classes?

Andrew Donaldson
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Codrut Tudor
1 hr
  -> thanks

agree  CNF: great options, too
8 hrs
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23 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
you


Explanation:
It is the polite form of the second person singular and also written like Ud.
It is derived from vuestra merced which could be roughly translated as your grace.
It is equivalent to the German polite form of Sie and the French vous.


Berry Prinsen
Spain
Local time: 03:57
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in pair: 12
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