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...agua que no has de beber, déjala correr...

English translation: Spanish Proverb

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:...agua que no has de beber, déjala correr...
English translation:Spanish Proverb
Entered by: Gabriel Aramburo Siegert
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

17:08 May 26, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: ...agua que no has de beber, déjala correr...
Stree jargon...
Gabriel Aramburo Siegert
Local time: 23:41
See explanation below:
Explanation:
Although Nikki's answer is great, I found this interesting link that offers good explanations for proverbs and sayings and their meaning in English. I thought you may find the link of assistance.

http://www.utas.edu.au/docs/flonta/DP,1,2,95/MEXICAN_AMERICA...

A proverb specifically concerned with the regulation of social relationships between the sexes is Cuiden sus gallinas que mi gallo anda suelto, which was addressed to one of our informants by her mother to justify the restraints placed on her social activities. In published collections the proverb is usually described as a warning directed by the parents of young men to the parents of young girls (see, for example, Cerda 1970, p.282), but in either case the effect is the same: a reminder that in the view of the community, responsibility for proper conduct lies principally with the girl and her family. While male informants have reported being admonished in proverbial terms to take cognizance of their own responsibilities and to avoid casual relationships (Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr; Si no compras, no mallugues [magulles]), proverbial concern appears to be directed primarily toward the female side. Even proverbs more general in application are employed for this purpose. Tanto va el cantarito al agua hasta que se quiebra, a saying appropriate to a wide variety of contexts, was used by the mother of one informant to warn her daughter that, in the informant's words, "if a girl runs around with a lot of boys she's likely to end up pregnant." Another young woman was directed by her mother to refuse an expensive gift from a boyfriend on grounds that El que da bien vende y el que lo recibe bien lo entiende, i.e., acceptance of the gift would amount to recognition of an obligation to reciprocate in some way. A third informant, protesting that the severe restrictions placed on her dating behavior indicated an unjustified lack of trust on the part of her parents, was told that Bajo la desconfianza vive la seguridad--an excellent example of the "depersonalizing" effect of proverbs, in that it implies that any lack of trust is not focused on the daughter as an individual but is in accord with "traditional wisdom". Finally, we come to a particularly interesting account of proverb usage contributed by a young woman whose "steady" boyfriend had some time earlier returned to Mexico for an indefinite period, and whose grandmother had since then repeatedly urged her to establish new social contacts more likely to lead to a permanent relationship, i.e., marriage. With some assistance from another member of the family the young woman recorded one grandmotherly lecture that in the space of a few minutes utilized no less than half a dozen proverbs, beginning with Amor de lejos, amor de pendejos and continuing on through Amor nuevo olvida viejos, Donde no hay amor no hay dolor, Amor con amor se paga, El que más te quiere te hará llorar, and Antes de casar, tener casa en que llorar y tierras que sembrar (this last a variant of an old saying using morar in place of llorar).

With very young children, parents may resort not to overtly didactic proverbs but to more indirect techniques, such as standardized responses that have the appearance of nonsense-rhymes but in effect serve to teach the child what is or is not appropriate behavior. A child who asks an impertinent question, for example, such as what a certain package contains, may be told Picos y tolondrones para los preguntones, or a variant thereof--a humorous response as well as a light reprimand designed to discourage further questions. A child's complaint that he is hungry--"Tengo hambre"--may be turned aside with the comment Suéltala a que ande. (This latter type of response has also been reported as used among children themselves as a kind of "catch" question and response: ¿Tienes frío? Tápate con la capa de tu tío Josecillo.) One young woman recalled that when, as a small child, she would attempt to press her mother for an answer to some particular request, she would be told: Ya veremos...dijo el ciego. The saying, probably the best known example in Spanish of the special variety of proverbs known as Wellerisms, was in effect a negative answer and was understood by the girl as such: the blind man would never see, and the request would not be granted.

Selected response from:

Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
Local time: 23:41
Grading comment
Thanks for the effort. I owe you 2 points till you get the American equivalent proverb! If you go by the word, it sounds terrible: "Water you are not to drink... let it go"
2 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +9don't be a dog in a manger
Nikki Graham
5Live and let livexxxtrans4u
4See explanation below:
Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
5 -1Let sleeping dogs lieJane Lamb-Ruiz
3If you're not interested, don't spoil things for me/for other peoplemarkaqui


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
Let sleeping dogs lie


Explanation:
dejar la agua correr, sino se produce un siniestro o algo dañoso?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-26 17:33:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, Gabriel, can\'t think of a corresponding one right this minute but will come back if I can. :)



Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 7709

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Valeria Verona: No, Jane... me parece que lo que vos pusiste tiene que ver con no remover un asunto para que no se desate un lío, una catástrofe. Lo que pregunta Gabriel es distinto. Pero la verdad no sé cómo se dice en inglés :-(
12 mins

agree  Gabriela Tenenbaum: Yo creo que es el equivalente más cercano.
23 mins

disagree  Leonardo Parachú: I agree with Valeria, and it´s "el agua" by the way. Nikki´s response is the one
27 mins

neutral  Geoff Hargreaves: I'd say, "Don't go looking for trouble!"
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

35 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
don't be a dog in a manger


Explanation:
according to Collins

Dog in the manger

What it means
To prevent someone from having something that one does not need.

Example of usage
Malcolm, lend your bicycle to your sister since you cannot ride it anyway. Don't be a dog in the manger.

How this idiom came about
From Aesop's fable in which a dog, which cannot eat hay, lay in the manger and prevented other animals from eating the hay.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-26 17:51:03 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Some more refs to see if this is what you want:
Glossary entry for
dog in the manger
From Brewer\'s Dictionary of Phrase & Fable:
A mean-spirited individual who will not use what is wanted by another, nor yet let the other have it to use; one who prevents another enjoying something without any benefit to himself. The allusion is to the fable of the dog that fixed his place in a manger and would not allow the ox to come near the hay but would not eat it himself.
From The Dictionary of Cultural Literacy:

A person who spitefully refuses to let someone else benefit from something for which he or she has no personal use: \"We asked our neighbor for the fence posts he had left over, but, like a dog in the manger, he threw them out rather than give them to us.\" The phrase comes from one of Aesop\'s fables, about a dog lying in a manger full of hay. When an ox tries to eat some hay, the dog bites him, despite the fact that the hay is of no use to the dog.
http://www.harbour.sfu.ca/~hayward/van/glossary/manger.html


A dog in the manger, an ugly-natured person who prevents others from enjoying what would be an advantage to them but is none to him.
http://www.dictionary.com/search?q=A dog in the manger


    Reference: http://www.creativeclassroom.com.sg/learn_adv/al_dog.htm
    Reference: http://www.google.com/search?num=20&site=swr&hl=en&lr=&ie=UT...
Nikki Graham
United Kingdom
Local time: 05:41
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 5564

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Leonardo Parachú: also know as "el perro del ortelano, que no come ni deja comer"
3 mins
  -> Thanks Leonardo

agree  markaqui
7 mins
  -> Gracias

agree  Alex Potts: Y ya que nos gusta corregir, Leonardo, es "hortelano"!
1 hr
  -> Gracias Alex

agree  Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi): Great answer...right on the money!
1 hr
  -> Thank you

agree  Baruch Avidar
2 hrs
  -> Gracias

agree  Giles Bickford: This was also the title of a great song that was poplar in Venezuela, at least, in the 80s - can't remember the name of the group - anyone?
3 hrs

agree  clout1945
8 hrs
  -> Thanks everyone

agree  Mabel Garzón
20 hrs

agree  Andrea Bullrich: great answer! sorry I'm so late : (
10 days
  -> Well, the asker obviously didn't think so!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

40 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
If you're not interested, don't spoil things for me/for other people


Explanation:
I found this in my Oxford dictionary.

It would be helpful to know a little bit fo the situation this phrase refers to. Also, this translation obvioulsy doesn't sound like folk wisdom as does the original.

Maybe you could use something as simple as "Mind your own business".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-05-26 17:53:11 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

After reading Nikki\'s suggestion I retract the \"Mind your own business.\" That\'s obviously off track. She found a folksy way to capture the dry translation that Oxford offers.

markaqui
United States
Local time: 21:41
PRO pts in pair: 105
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
See explanation below:


Explanation:
Although Nikki's answer is great, I found this interesting link that offers good explanations for proverbs and sayings and their meaning in English. I thought you may find the link of assistance.

http://www.utas.edu.au/docs/flonta/DP,1,2,95/MEXICAN_AMERICA...

A proverb specifically concerned with the regulation of social relationships between the sexes is Cuiden sus gallinas que mi gallo anda suelto, which was addressed to one of our informants by her mother to justify the restraints placed on her social activities. In published collections the proverb is usually described as a warning directed by the parents of young men to the parents of young girls (see, for example, Cerda 1970, p.282), but in either case the effect is the same: a reminder that in the view of the community, responsibility for proper conduct lies principally with the girl and her family. While male informants have reported being admonished in proverbial terms to take cognizance of their own responsibilities and to avoid casual relationships (Agua que no has de beber, déjala correr; Si no compras, no mallugues [magulles]), proverbial concern appears to be directed primarily toward the female side. Even proverbs more general in application are employed for this purpose. Tanto va el cantarito al agua hasta que se quiebra, a saying appropriate to a wide variety of contexts, was used by the mother of one informant to warn her daughter that, in the informant's words, "if a girl runs around with a lot of boys she's likely to end up pregnant." Another young woman was directed by her mother to refuse an expensive gift from a boyfriend on grounds that El que da bien vende y el que lo recibe bien lo entiende, i.e., acceptance of the gift would amount to recognition of an obligation to reciprocate in some way. A third informant, protesting that the severe restrictions placed on her dating behavior indicated an unjustified lack of trust on the part of her parents, was told that Bajo la desconfianza vive la seguridad--an excellent example of the "depersonalizing" effect of proverbs, in that it implies that any lack of trust is not focused on the daughter as an individual but is in accord with "traditional wisdom". Finally, we come to a particularly interesting account of proverb usage contributed by a young woman whose "steady" boyfriend had some time earlier returned to Mexico for an indefinite period, and whose grandmother had since then repeatedly urged her to establish new social contacts more likely to lead to a permanent relationship, i.e., marriage. With some assistance from another member of the family the young woman recorded one grandmotherly lecture that in the space of a few minutes utilized no less than half a dozen proverbs, beginning with Amor de lejos, amor de pendejos and continuing on through Amor nuevo olvida viejos, Donde no hay amor no hay dolor, Amor con amor se paga, El que más te quiere te hará llorar, and Antes de casar, tener casa en que llorar y tierras que sembrar (this last a variant of an old saying using morar in place of llorar).

With very young children, parents may resort not to overtly didactic proverbs but to more indirect techniques, such as standardized responses that have the appearance of nonsense-rhymes but in effect serve to teach the child what is or is not appropriate behavior. A child who asks an impertinent question, for example, such as what a certain package contains, may be told Picos y tolondrones para los preguntones, or a variant thereof--a humorous response as well as a light reprimand designed to discourage further questions. A child's complaint that he is hungry--"Tengo hambre"--may be turned aside with the comment Suéltala a que ande. (This latter type of response has also been reported as used among children themselves as a kind of "catch" question and response: ¿Tienes frío? Tápate con la capa de tu tío Josecillo.) One young woman recalled that when, as a small child, she would attempt to press her mother for an answer to some particular request, she would be told: Ya veremos...dijo el ciego. The saying, probably the best known example in Spanish of the special variety of proverbs known as Wellerisms, was in effect a negative answer and was understood by the girl as such: the blind man would never see, and the request would not be granted.



Luis Rey Ballesteros (Luiroi)
Local time: 23:41
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 3731
Grading comment
Thanks for the effort. I owe you 2 points till you get the American equivalent proverb! If you go by the word, it sounds terrible: "Water you are not to drink... let it go"
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

1 day4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Live and let live


Explanation:
To each their own.

Hope this helps,

Bye

xxxtrans4u
PRO pts in pair: 308
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