KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Other

morir con las botas puestas

English translation: to die with one's boots on

Advertisement

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:morir con las botas puestas
English translation:to die with one's boots on
Entered by: Bill Greendyk
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:21 Jun 8, 2002
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
/ Dichos y frases populares
Spanish term or phrase: morir con las botas puestas
Es un dicho que significa estar convencido, ser fiel, y mantener una ideología, postura o pensamiento propio, sin traicionarlo nunca; aunque esa ideología, postura o pensamiento pueda no dar resultados, o ser efectiva. Una cuestión entre convicción y terquedad. Muchas gracias a todos.
Leonardo Parachú
Local time: 12:51
to die with one's boots on
Explanation:
Hi Leo!

We say the same in English, and it has the same meaning.

Saludos.
Selected response from:

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 11:51
Grading comment
Mil gracias Bill, tenía la vaga idea de que era así y quería confirmarlo, más que nada el "on". Y gracias también SJH por el origen del dicho. Ojalá se pudieran repartir los puntos.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

Advertisement


Summary of answers provided
4 +2to die with your boots on/in harness
Sheila Hardie
4 +1to die with one's boots on
Bill Greendyk
4to be loyal to your convictions until you die
Robert INGLEDEW


  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
to die with one's boots on


Explanation:
Hi Leo!

We say the same in English, and it has the same meaning.

Saludos.

Bill Greendyk
United States
Local time: 11:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 527
Grading comment
Mil gracias Bill, tenía la vaga idea de que era así y quería confirmarlo, más que nada el "on". Y gracias también SJH por el origen del dicho. Ojalá se pudieran repartir los puntos.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheila Hardie: yes, also see my ref below:)
29 mins
  -> Thanks, nice reference!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
to be loyal to your convictions until you die


Explanation:
or to take your convictions with you to the grave.

Another option.

Robert INGLEDEW
Argentina
Local time: 12:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1940
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

38 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to die with your boots on/in harness


Explanation:
I agree with both of the answers above, but I also suggest 'to die in harness' as another option. I found an article that you might find interesting - I did! It explains - well gives one explanation of - the origin of this expression.

HTH

Sheila


Re: To die with your boots on.

------------------------------------------------------------------------
Posted by masakim on September 07, 2001 at 22:18:04:

In Reply to: Re: To die with your boots on. posted by JaneS on January 19, 2001 at 17:26:06:

: : : Where did the saying "die with your boots on" come from and what does it mean.

: : This probably comes from the old West. If you died sick and/or old, you died in your bed with your boots off. If you died in a gunfight, you died with your boots on.

: I've also heard it used to describe someone who worked every single day of their lives. But, I like the gunfighter meaning best!

Boot Hill
A name given to the frontier cemetery because most of its early occupants died with their boots on. The name has had an appeal as part of the romantic side of the West and has become familiar as representing the violent end of a reckless life.
From Western Words: A Dictionary of the American West by Ramon F. Adams (University of Oklahoma Press, 1968)

die with one's boots Also, die in harness.
Expire while working, keep working to the end....
Both phrases probably allude to soldiers who died on active duty. Until the early 1600s the noun "boot" denoted a piece of armor for the legs, which may have given rise to this usage....
From The American Heritage Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer (1997)
Follow Ups:

http://phrases.shu.ac.uk/bulletin_board/10/messages/699.html

Sheila Hardie
Spain
Local time: 17:51
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 1355

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Bill Greendyk: Nice one, SJH!
9 mins
  -> thanks, William - I thought it was interesting too - I love finding the origins of expressions like that:)

agree  Jennifer Callahan: Eventhough it's th Oklahoma Press, don't forget that Boot Hill is in Tombstone, Arizona (one of the claims to fame of us Arizonans!)
5 hrs
  -> I'll bear that in mind! Thank, Jennifer:-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also:



Term search
  • All of ProZ.com
  • Term search
  • Jobs
  • Forums
  • Multiple search