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moza de prietas carnes

English translation: a fine young lass

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14:47 Jan 9, 2003
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: moza de prietas carnes
El muchacho hacia guinos a la chica, moza de prietas carnes.
Ros
English translation:a fine young lass
Explanation:
Lass is more or less the same as moza. Fine, in the same context, would mean healthy and wholesome looking.
Selected response from:

Sheilann
Spain
Local time: 12:34
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4tight-bodied wenchoutlier
3 +3Firm-bodied girl.Sara Noss
4 +2a fine young lassSheilann
4 +1my two centsSusana Galilea
4a real looker
Marion Burns


  

Answers


14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +3
Firm-bodied girl.


Explanation:
However, this sounds a bit cumbersome. In the UK a good looking person can be described as 'fit'. So, with this in mind, we could translate it as 'fit looking girl'.

HTH
Sara

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Note added at 2003-01-09 15:06:07 (GMT)
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The lad winked at the fit looking girl.

Or, would it be enough to say the girl was a \'babe\'?

The boy winked at the girl, a real babe.


Sara Noss
United Kingdom
Local time: 11:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 112

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Paul Edgar
4 mins
  -> Thank you, Paul.

agree  Marianela Melleda
7 mins
  -> Gracias MariannMe.

agree  Rick Henry: or just tight body
16 mins
  -> Cheers Rick

neutral  outlier: Not perfect, see below
1 hr
  -> Ok, Just looking now. :-)
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
tight-bodied wench


Explanation:
'Moza' is an old-fashioned term. I think neither 'girl' nor 'babe' fits as a translation. Wench is also old-fashioned...

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Note added at 2003-01-09 16:20:15 (GMT)
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Ros, you\'re the one that asked that question about \'la sorna gachona de toreros y majos\' just a few minutes ago... I suppose it\'s the same text and, believe me, it looks an ancient spanish ;-) If it\'s not, I agree with Susana, a literal translation makes no sense...

outlier

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sara Noss: Well, this certainly has an 'old fashioned' flavour, I agree. Particularly the 'wench' part. I do like Susana's suggestion though.
14 mins
  -> Thanks ;-)

agree  sanlev: i like it it. it seemes to fit
48 mins

agree  LoreAC
3 hrs

agree  AlwaysMoving: I would use both tems suggeted PERKY WENCH
5 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
my two cents


Explanation:
As far as I know, "moza" does not have perjorative connotations as EDLING suggests...at least not in a general context. Gallegos affectionately call their significant others "mi mozo/a".

"Moza de prietas carnes" is a bit of an idiom in Castilian Spanish, meaning an attractive female (usually young, otherwise the "carnes" tend to be more on the "fláccidas" side).

My sense is there is no point in trying for a literal translation, which might end up sounding contrived or awkward.

In this instance we might be best served with a colloquial equivalent in English.

Here is my suggestion, from a US English point of view:

"a perky young thing"

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Note added at 2003-01-09 22:22:36 (GMT)
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http://www.ice.deusto.es/ras/pdf/n3.pdf
... La moza del bar abrió de una soberana patada la puerta abatible que ... La joven era de carnes prietas y abundantes, dicharachera, descarada, y meneaba las ...


http://suse00.su.ehu.es/euskonews/0044zbk/gaia4405es.html
En el sendero subía una rapaza de carnes prietas, cumplida y garvosa, de buen donaire. Y ala, con sus rotundideces nos ofrecía plácido mirar, casto y bueno. Buena contemplación.

Susana Galilea
United States
Local time: 05:34
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 1475

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sara Noss: Just the right tone.
14 mins
  -> thanks much

disagree  Refugio: Perky has more to do with attitude than with form, and it could never be used to call a person well-built. You may be thinking of the expression, perky breasts, but that just means they are not sagging and isnt applied to the whole person.
3 hrs
  -> And "prietas carnes" does not necessarily imply "fit looking", but rather youthful and attractive. In fact it is not unusual to find that description applied to a generously proportioned woman (see examples above).

agree  Allison Menditto
8 hrs
  -> thanks much
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
a fine young lass


Explanation:
Lass is more or less the same as moza. Fine, in the same context, would mean healthy and wholesome looking.

Sheilann
Spain
Local time: 12:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 886

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: I like this one, especially since both fine and lass have an old-fashioned sound and carry the flavor of the original.
1 hr

agree  Paul Edgar: Nice idea!
4 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
a real looker


Explanation:
a real looker
a real winner

It seems to me the tone is modern and colloquial


("lass" or "wench" are more literary, and sound somewhat archaic)

Marion Burns
United States
Local time: 06:34
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 20
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