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amenazar a alguien con los guantes

English translation: The Marquis threatened with the [x?]

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15:11 Jan 10, 2003
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: amenazar a alguien con los guantes
El Marques la amenazo con los guantes
Ros
English translation:The Marquis threatened with the [x?]
Explanation:
RAE: 3
3. m. p. us. Agasajo o gratificación, especialmente la que se suele dar sobre el precio de algo que se vende o traspasa. Era u. en pl.

If this is the meaning, which I suppose it could be, one would need more context, right?

OR

The Marquis waved his gloves at her threateningly....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-10 17:19:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

INSPIRATION: The Marquis threatened to STRIKE HER WITH HIS GLOVES

Meaning the old bastard had them in one hand raised, and shook them at her, poor thing.....:):)
Selected response from:

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +4to threateningly wave one's gloves at sb
Pablo Fdez. Moriano
5The Marquis threatened with the [x?]Jane Lamb-Ruiz
5 -1see explanation
lcmolinari
4The Marquis threateningly waved his gloves at her
sanlev
3The Marquess threatened her to a duel
Fabian Luttman
3 -1made a veiled threat
Lucy Phillips


  

Answers


15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -1
see explanation


Explanation:
Well, in centuries past, when men dualled for honour, they signalled their intentions with a slap across the face with their gloves. In your context, it seems the Marquis was threatening a dual, although it is unclear as to whether he has actually slapped the other person with the gloves or maybe just waving them around, threatening to do so.

"It was even well known for a man to slap a man's face with his glove as a way to provoke a dual, usually to defend a Lady's honour when She had been openly disgraced."

I won't subject you to the site I found this example on!

lcmolinari
Canada
Local time: 03:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 66

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  xxxArtebuz: The article "la" suggests that the Marquis is addressing a woman. If this were so, he would hardly be threatening a duel. On the other hand, if it is a lady and she is related to him, a gesture of this kind, in public, would be very embarrassing to her.
14 mins
  -> True, I had overlooked the 'la' and no he wouldn't be threatening a woman to a duel.
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17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
The Marquess threatened her to a duel


Explanation:
an idea...

Fabian Luttman
Canada
Local time: 03:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 41

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  LoreAC
1 hr
  -> Thanks

disagree  outlier: As stated above: quite unusual to challenge a woman to a duel
1 hr
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19 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): -1
made a veiled threat


Explanation:
A paragraph or so of context would be useful for this one. I'm making a bit of a creative guess here based on the idea of "treating s/o with kid gloves", for which Spanish also uses "guantes". Obviously gloves can't be applied to a threat in English but a "veiled threat" is a common term.

Lucy Phillips
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:14
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 310

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  lcmolinari: Good term but I don't think the appropriate one here. A veiled threat is one that is disguised, not an open and aggressive threat. I think it's quite obvious a threat was made here.
10 mins
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +4
to threateningly wave one's gloves at sb


Explanation:
The marquess threateningly clenched or waved his gloves at her.

A suggestion

Pablo Fdez. Moriano
Spain
Local time: 09:14
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 16

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Refugio: Waved is what immediately came to mind, or even brandished if we're not using it with the pikes.
16 mins
  -> Thanks, I really appreciate it

agree  outlier: I like this one
33 mins
  -> Glad you like it, thank you

agree  xxxEDLING
1 hr
  -> Thank you!

agree  johnclaude
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, John
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
The Marquis threatened with the [x?]


Explanation:
RAE: 3
3. m. p. us. Agasajo o gratificación, especialmente la que se suele dar sobre el precio de algo que se vende o traspasa. Era u. en pl.

If this is the meaning, which I suppose it could be, one would need more context, right?

OR

The Marquis waved his gloves at her threateningly....

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-10 17:19:12 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

INSPIRATION: The Marquis threatened to STRIKE HER WITH HIS GLOVES

Meaning the old bastard had them in one hand raised, and shook them at her, poor thing.....:):)

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 7709

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Pablo Fdez. Moriano: I agree with your second option, but the first seems improbable, first because it is in plural (and the use in this sense should be normally in singular) and second because "el guante" is a reward rather than a threat. As you say, more context would help
1 hr
  -> no, the RAE say guantes in the PLURAL
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4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
The Marquis threateningly waved his gloves at her


Explanation:
It could be a stretch in the assumption but apparently there is a threat where either literally OR figuratively gloves are involved. Translated literally , the action of such a threat made sense to me.

sanlev
Local time: 03:14
Native speaker of: Native in TurkishTurkish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Jane Lamb-Ruiz: I already said that with the adverb at the end
2 hrs
  -> ok, ok, no need to fret.. I didnt see your addition. It was kind of lost in your notes. You are more than welcome to have the points/
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