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endivia

English translation: chicory (in UK English); endive (in US English)

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09:57 Jun 29, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Other
Spanish term or phrase: endivia
receta de cocina
abrilsp
English translation:chicory (in UK English); endive (in US English)
Explanation:
There are many different types of endive, but the one referred to as endivia (yellowish-white with smooth leaves) is referred to as chicory in the UK, but endive in the US.

Just in case it isn't a US-targetted translation :-)

The link below contains a whole bunch of such culinary differences.

# chicory : endive
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/People/mbishop/engfood.html

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Note added at 24 mins (2004-06-29 10:22:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The translation depends on who you are talking to (unless you are a plant taxonomist of course - then it\'s much easier!)

Chicory (Cichorium endivia)
The word chicory means different things to different people. The sharp-tasting salad plant is known as chicory to the French, the Belgians and the North Americans, while in England and Germany, chicory means Belgian endive.
http://www.hungrymonster.com/FoodFacts/Food_Facts.cfm?Phrase...
Selected response from:

xxx
Grading comment
thanks
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +9chicory (in UK English); endive (in US English)xxx
5 +5endive
Sandra Alboum
5 +1endive
anaell
5Chicory, Endive or Witloof Chicory
Marijke Singer
4 +1endive
awdotia
5chicory
Felicite Robertson


  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
endive


Explanation:
Cichorium endivia (Endive, Scarole)
Cichorium endivia (Endive, Scarole). ... Cichorium endivia, Endive Escarole (French in
origin but now used mainly in English to refer to the broad-leaved variety). ...
www.museums.org.za/bio/plants/ asteraceae/cichorium_endivia.htm - 5k -

awdotia
Poland
Local time: 10:47
Native speaker of: Polish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rosa Diez Tagarro
14 mins

neutral  xxx: Although I do agree that it can be translated as endive, the refs you have given for Cichorium endivia are actually for 'Escarola' not 'Endibia' (Cichorium intybus).
44 mins
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2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +5
endive


Explanation:
Hope this helps.


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 mins (2004-06-29 10:00:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

By the way, the spelling is \"endibia\". Also translated as \"chicory\".

http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=endi...

Sandra Alboum
United States
Local time: 04:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 20

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Sheilann: I've also seen it as chicory, but endive is far more common
9 mins
  -> I've heard of chicory, but if I came across it in a recipe, I'd have to look it up. I didn't know it was the same thing as endive. Ah, the things you learn on KudoZ!

agree  Rosa Diez Tagarro: Endive, not chicory. They are members of the same family, but not the same thing: Cichorium endiva and Cichorium intybus.
14 mins
  -> Very interesting! And the funny thing is that I like neither :-)

agree  xxxRNolder: endive
3 hrs
  -> Thanks!

agree  kifriedman: Absolutely
4 hrs
  -> Thank you, Karen!

agree  Andrea Sacchi
5 hrs
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3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
endive


Explanation:
endibia....con "b" en españa

anaell
Spain
Local time: 10:47
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Rosa Diez Tagarro
14 mins
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14 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
chicory


Explanation:
At Tesco for example, they use Chicory.

engl.: witloof chicory, Brussels chicory, French endive.

Felicite Robertson
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:47
Native speaker of: Native in FrenchFrench, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rosa Diez Tagarro: They are members of the same family, but not the same thing: Cichorium endiva and Cichorium intybus
9 mins
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +9
chicory (in UK English); endive (in US English)


Explanation:
There are many different types of endive, but the one referred to as endivia (yellowish-white with smooth leaves) is referred to as chicory in the UK, but endive in the US.

Just in case it isn't a US-targetted translation :-)

The link below contains a whole bunch of such culinary differences.

# chicory : endive
http://www-2.cs.cmu.edu/People/mbishop/engfood.html

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 24 mins (2004-06-29 10:22:32 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The translation depends on who you are talking to (unless you are a plant taxonomist of course - then it\'s much easier!)

Chicory (Cichorium endivia)
The word chicory means different things to different people. The sharp-tasting salad plant is known as chicory to the French, the Belgians and the North Americans, while in England and Germany, chicory means Belgian endive.
http://www.hungrymonster.com/FoodFacts/Food_Facts.cfm?Phrase...

xxx
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
Grading comment
thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Rosa Diez Tagarro: I think "endibia" is endive in UK English. The thing is that apparently in the US they call chicory endive. But they are two different things all the same.
9 mins
  -> What is seen as endibia (not escarola) in the verduleria is known as chicory in the UK. It's actually belgian endive (Cichorium intybus), but brits like to go against the flow I guess. Cichorium endivia is 'Escarola'.

agree  LCK: actually, Iain, if you go by the definition in the Oxford dictionary, you are absolutely correct. It depends what country is this translation for :-) Saludos
14 mins
  -> Thanks Lisa

agree  Manuel Plaza
16 mins
  -> Gracias Manuel

agree  Lucy Phillips
55 mins
  -> Thanks Lucy

agree  Mapi: I have seen both terms used in the UK for the same thing, while in Spain endibia seems to be the general preference over achicoria which is probably kind of old fashioned, I didn't even know that escarola is a type of endive!
1 hr
  -> Thanks Mapi. I reckon this is one of those cases of regional differences arising that don't necessarily have any particular logic.

agree  xxxRNolder: speaking for myself in the U.S. - we call it endive!
3 hrs
  -> Thanks. This is what I understood - long live diversity!

agree  Maria Faella
3 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  nothing: http://www.watercress.co.uk/recipes/salads.053.shtml I thought a photo would settle it.
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  lincasanova
8 hrs
  -> Thank you

agree  NoraBellettieri
8 hrs
  -> Thanks Nora
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26 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
Chicory, Endive or Witloof Chicory


Explanation:
Depends on what it looks like.
See website:
http://aggie-horticulture.tamu.edu/plantanswers/vegetables/c...

Chicory, Endive and Witloof
Description - Endive (Cichorium endiva and chicory Cichorium intybus) are members of the Composite family. Endive has two forms, narrow-leaved endive called curly endive and the broad-leaved endive which is often called escarole. The outside leaves of an endive head are green and bitter. The inner leaves of the endive head are light green to creamy-white and milder flavored. Both types of endive are used in salad mixtures with blander- flavored lettuce to prepare a salad with a "little bite" to the flavor.

Chicory is an important salad vegetable in Europe but not in the U.S. It is most popular in France, Belgium and Holland. In the U.S., chicory is grown for the green leaves which are used as a salad green and for the thick roots which are used in the southern U.S. as an additive flavor to coffee and sometimes as a coffee substitute.

Witloof Chicory (also called French or Belgian Endive) denotes the blanched, tight heads produced by forcing (or growing in the darkness) the big mature chicory roots in forcing structures.

Culture - Endive is grown like lettuce. Seed is sown in early spring in the garden. Plants can be started in the greenhouse and transplanted to the garden for growing and extra early crop. Chicory for greens is grown much the same way. For chicory greens, seed is planted in early spring and the leaves are ready for harvesting in about 60 days. The greens are often blanched by clipping the leaves together when they are about ten inches long. Roots for producing Witloof chicory are grown this way. Seed is planted after danger of frost in the spring. The roots are harvested in the fall before hard freezing occurs. The foliage is removed and the roots are stacked in the field. After they are exposed to cold the roots are planted upright in moist sand and forced to grow a new head by keeping the air temperature near 64 degrees.

Selection - Endive heads should be clean, free of browning, crisp and bright green. Chicory greens resemble Dandelion leaves and should be fresh and free of brown streaks or spots. Young, tender leaves are preferred over older, tougher leaves. Select chicory heads (called chicons) should be pure white, very tight with only the outer two leaves visible. The chicon size for highest grade is at least one inch thick and four and one-half inches long. Endive and chicory greens placed in plastic bags will store in refrigeration for about ten days. Chicory roots should be stored in the refrigerator at 38 to 42o F. and will keep for several months until used or forced to produce chicons.



Marijke Singer
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:47
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 16
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