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Othello

English translation: like a shaking spear

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18:09 May 20, 2005
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Poetry & Literature
Spanish term or phrase: Othello
apelo a la inventiva de traductores argentinos! se trata de una persona que hace muchos chistes.
el dialogo es asi:
a como te llamas?
b yago
a que nombre es ese?
b Como en Otelo de Shakespeare
a Queres decir que te llamas como un telo?

HELP!
AleTolj
Local time: 20:11
English translation:like a shaking spear
Explanation:
OK, don't shoot, I couldn't come up with anything smarter :)
If we can't render the joke about Othello in English, perhaps we could use the name Shakespeare for a similar play on words:
-Like Shakespeare's Othello
-You mean your name is like a shaking spear?

Not very funny, I know; I hope someone will have a better suggestion.

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Note added at 16 hrs 40 mins (2005-05-21 10:49:45 GMT)
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OK, here\'s another idea: so that we don\'t completely lose the connotation of \"telo\", I thought of \"bordello\". I know it\'s not the same, but it rhymes with Othello. Hopefully your context allows for the use of such a word.

-Like Shakespeare\'s Othello
-You mean your name is like a bordello? / you\'re named after a bordello?
Selected response from:

Maria Karra
United States
Local time: 19:11
Grading comment
I liked the word bordello... Thanks!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2Otelo
Gabriela Rodriguez
5 +2Motelo.
Juan Jacob
4ver comentario
Maria Boschero
2like a shaking spear
Maria Karra
2IagoJane Lamb-Ruiz


Discussion entries: 8





  

Answers


6 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Otelo


Explanation:
Othello

A tragedy by William Shakespeare. The title character, a Moor, or dark-skinned Muslim, is a general commanding the forces of Venice. The villain Iago convinces Othello that Desdemona, the general's beautiful and faithful wife, has been guilty of adultery; at the end of the play, Othello smothers Desdemona. A famous line from the play is Othello's description of himself as “one that loved not wisely but too well.”
Othello

This page is about the Shakespeare play, for the board game, see Othello board game.

"Othello and Desdemona in Venice" by Théodore Chassériau (1819-1856)
"Othello and Desdemona in Venice" by Théodore Chassériau (1819-1856)

Othello: The Moor of Venice is a play by Shakespeare written about 1603. Othello is a tragedy, like Hamlet, Macbeth and King Lear. Shakespeare probably wrote Othello after Hamlet but before the latter two. The first recorded performance was on November 1, 1604 at Whitehall Palace in London.

The title character, Othello, is a noble Moor (North African Muslim) who commands an army in Cyprus. He is presented sympathetically despite his race. This is unusual for English literature of Shakespeare's time, which commonly depicted Moors and other dark-skinned peoples as villains. There is some controversy among scholars whether Othello was meant to be black (by today's standards of ethnicity) or Arab or both, though popular consensus among average readers and audiences today lean towards the former. Shakespeare avoids any discussion of Islam in the play.

Plot summary
Spoiler warning: Plot or ending details follow.

Othello, who has just eloped with Desdemona when the play opens, leaves Venice to command the Venetian armies in Cyprus. When Desdemona and Cassio join Othello in Cyprus, the treacherous standard-bearer Iago persuades Othello that Desdemona has been unfaithful to him with Cassio. Othello kills Desdemona in anger. Iago's wife, Emilia, then reveals that Desdemona's affair was an invention of Iago's. Iago kills Emilia and Othello commits suicide. Cassio rules Cyprus and Iago's punishment is left for Cassio to decide (see also Othello list of characters).

The plot for Othello was developed from Giraldi Cinthio's Hecatommithi, which it follows closely. The only named character in Cinthio's story is "Disdemona" (Greek for 'unfortunate'); the other characters were identified only as 'the standard-bearer,' 'the captain,' and 'the Moor.' In the original, the standard-bearer lusts after Disdemona, and is spurred to revenge when she rejects him. Shakespeare invented a new character, Roderigo, who pursues the Moor's wife and is killed while trying to kill Cassio. The Moor in Cinthio's story never repents of murdering his wife, and both he and the standard-bearer escape Venice and are killed only much later. Cinthio also drew a moral (which he placed in the mouth of the lady) that European women are unwise to marry the hot-blooded, uncontrollable males of other nations; Shakespeare suppressed this observation.

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Note added at 7 mins (2005-05-20 18:16:33 GMT)
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http://www.answers.com/Othello

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Note added at 8 mins (2005-05-20 18:18:01 GMT)
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Acerca de ésta obra: La sospecha es tal vez una de las peores desventajas del alma humana. Otelo, un clásico de la literatura universal, retoma uno de los grandes temas de las relaciones humanas: los celos. Su origen, intensidad y consecuencias en una obra magnífica escrita con la inigualable pluma de William Shakespeare. Un viaje al alma de un ser atormentado por los celos a través de un recorrido construido con la más hermosa literatura clásica. Una obra para apasionados.
http://members.fortunecity.com/detalles2002/teatro/william/o...

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Note added at 9 mins (2005-05-20 18:19:24 GMT)
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Supongo que será que una de las personas (bastante inculta, por cierto)confundió el nombre Otelo con un hotel alojamiento (en Argentina les dicen \"telos\").
Suerte!!!!!!!!!!!!

Gabriela Rodriguez
Argentina
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Roxana Cortijo: por lo que entiendo de su pregunta, lo que quiere es mantener el chiste "otelo" = un telo (hotel alojamiento en Argentina)
4 mins
  -> Hola Roxana, tenés razón, por eso le pregunté qué es lo que quería e hice alusión a los hoteles alojamiento. Saludos!!!!!!!!!!!

agree  Clare Macnamara
6 mins
  -> Hola Clare, muchas gracias por tu amabilidad y saludos!!!!!!!!!!!

neutral  Juan Jacob: Sí, acá es donde hay que echar mano de nuestra imaginación y humor.
40 mins
  -> Tenés razón Juan, es una pregunta realmente cómica. Te mando muchos saludos y buen finde!!!!!!!!!!!77

agree  carlie602
2 days6 hrs
  -> Thank you very much carlie602, you are very kind. Greetings!!!!!!!!
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15 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
ver comentario


Explanation:
Te explico lo que es un "telo" para que el chiste tenga sentido. Es un lugar parecido a un hotel donde van las parejas a tener sexo y se paga por horas/ turnos.
Creo que esta es la respuesta a tu pregunta, verdad?

Maria Boschero
Argentina
Local time: 20:11
Native speaker of: Spanish
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36 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Motelo.


Explanation:
Venga, me atrevo a hacer un juego de palabras, ahora que sé lo que es un telo (hotel de paso, ¿verdad?)

-Like in Otelo, from Shakespeare.
-Ya mean... you're name (is like a) Motelo?

¡Jeje! Me pongo 5 de confidence porque me gusta mi chiste y no me importan las críticas.

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Note added at 38 mins (2005-05-20 18:48:08 GMT)
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Hotel de paso en Argentina = ¡\"Hotel de alojamiento\"! ¡Encantador!

Juan Jacob
Mexico
Local time: 18:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in FrenchFrench
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Maria Karra: Ja ja :)))) Yo me puse un 2 porque no me gustó tanto mi chiste :))) Aquí tienes la crítica: es "Othello" en inglés.
3 mins
  -> Oh, pues... venga, corrijo: -Like in Othello... Gracias.

agree  - Carolina: I like this one! :)
36 mins
  -> Me too... thanks!

agree  Gabriela Mejías: Muy bueno el juego de palabras!!! Menos mal que no se le ocurrió "albergue transitorio", como se los llama ahora a los telos de mi época!!! jaja.. saludos!
8 hrs
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3 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
Iago


Explanation:
What's your name?
Yago [I know, Iago]
What's kind of name is that?
Like in Shakepeare's Othello
You mean you have a yes-name?

Jane Lamb-Ruiz
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 44
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
como un telo
like a shaking spear


Explanation:
OK, don't shoot, I couldn't come up with anything smarter :)
If we can't render the joke about Othello in English, perhaps we could use the name Shakespeare for a similar play on words:
-Like Shakespeare's Othello
-You mean your name is like a shaking spear?

Not very funny, I know; I hope someone will have a better suggestion.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 16 hrs 40 mins (2005-05-21 10:49:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

OK, here\'s another idea: so that we don\'t completely lose the connotation of \"telo\", I thought of \"bordello\". I know it\'s not the same, but it rhymes with Othello. Hopefully your context allows for the use of such a word.

-Like Shakespeare\'s Othello
-You mean your name is like a bordello? / you\'re named after a bordello?

Maria Karra
United States
Local time: 19:11
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in GreekGreek
PRO pts in category: 8
Grading comment
I liked the word bordello... Thanks!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Juan Jacob: Pues ni tan malo... ahí te va neutral de regreso. Saludos.
12 mins
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Voters for reclassification
as
PRO / non-PRO
PRO (2): Ltemes, Roxana Cortijo


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Changes made by editors
Jun 25, 2005 - Changes made by Maria Karra:
FieldOther » Art/Literary
May 20, 2005 - Changes made by Maria Karra:
LevelNon-PRO » PRO


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