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muerto el perro se acabó la rabia

English translation: dead dogs don\'t bite

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:muerto el perro se acabó la rabia
English translation:dead dogs don\'t bite
Entered by: Rachel Freeman
Options:
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09:16 Apr 21, 2012
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Poetry & Literature / Idioms and Sayings
Spanish term or phrase: muerto el perro se acabó la rabia
Hi Everyone. I want to say thank you in advance. Everyone on this forum has been so helpful. I have another saying for you. This is from a Castilian Spanish anthology of plays, the author wants a universal English. In this play an official has been murdered by a General and a Lieutenant in a grab for power. The General, has released two soldiers on leave who know more about the plot then they are letting on and are starting to blackmail him.

General: Has escuchado teniente. Para fiarse de una india; en fin tiene razón; muerto el perro se acabó la rabia.

I'm not sure what we would say in English for this. Any ideas? Thanks again!
Rachel Freeman
Spain
Local time: 16:02
dead dogs don't bite
Explanation:
Creo que queda bien en el texto
Selected response from:

Diana Perez
United Arab Emirates
Local time: 18:02
Grading comment
Thank you!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
3 +6dead dogs don't bite
Diana Perez
2 +4out of sight, out of mind
Lisa McCarthy
4 +1Dead men tell no tales
axies
5it's best to deal with problems at their source
DOUBLE A EN<>ES
4 +11.the best way to solve a problem is to attack the cause of it
oriontranslator
3dead dogs don't bite
Julie Thurston
3the rotten apple's been removed from the barrelBobo Lockett


Discussion entries: 1





  

Answers


5 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5 peer agreement (net): +4
out of sight, out of mind


Explanation:
Not sure if this is close enough in meaning to the original.

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Note added at 12 mins (2012-04-21 09:29:09 GMT)
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What about "DEAD DOGS DON'T BITE" ?



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Note added at 16 mins (2012-04-21 09:33:41 GMT)
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http://www.curso-ingles.com/vocabulario2-ingles/refranes.php

***Muerto el perro, se acabó la rabia (dead dogs don’t bite)***: Frase digna del razonamiento de Perogrullo por la que se expresa que una vez que se extinguió la causa que producía un efecto, éste desaparece, lo mismo que sucede al morir un perro enfermo de rabia: la enfermedad deja de existir.

http://www.casadelasletras.com.ar/refranes/refranes_l.htm



Lisa McCarthy
Spain
Local time: 16:02
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 104

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Charles Davis: "Dead dogs don't bite" would be my choice, and you posted it (and documented it) first.
27 mins
  -> Thanks, Charles!

agree  Letredenoblesse
4 hrs
  -> Thanks, Agnes :)

agree  jacana54
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Lucia :)

agree  James A. Walsh: Ditto to Charles' comment.
12 hrs
  -> Cheers, James!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

17 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +6
dead dogs don't bite


Explanation:
Creo que queda bien en el texto


    Reference: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=338680
Diana Perez
United Arab Emirates
Local time: 18:02
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you!

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Graham Allen-Rawlings
7 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  Alex Lago
44 mins
  -> Thanks

agree  bizisyl
1 hr
  -> Thanks

agree  franglish
3 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  eski
5 hrs
  -> Thanks

agree  Francesca Samuel
11 hrs
  -> Thanks

neutral  James A. Walsh: This is the correct answer, IMO; however, LisaMac said the same and documented it in her answer before you...
12 hrs
  -> Sorry. I didn't notice. I only read the list above.

neutral  Lisa McCarthy: You could have deleted your answer and 'agreed' with mine by the way :)
4 days
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33 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
dead dogs don't bite


Explanation:
could this be considered

Julie Thurston
Local time: 08:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Charles Davis: See previous answers
5 mins
  -> see response

neutral  Alex Lago: already answered by someone else
28 mins
  -> yes I saw that later, but when I went to put my answer in it wasn't there, a matter of a few seconds. I wouldn't have committed that error!
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
1.the best way to solve a problem is to attack the cause of it


Explanation:
Hi,
I hope this will be helpful :)

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Note added at 47 mins (2012-04-21 10:04:34 GMT)
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As a native speaker I can say that both translations “dead dogs don’t bite” and “the best way to solve a problem is to attack the root/cause of it” are good. If you are looking for the translation which resembles most to the original, then it’s “dead dogs don’t bite”, but the meaning of all of them is the same.

http://cvc.cervantes.es/lengua/refranero/ficha.aspx?Par=5910...

Have a good translation!


oriontranslator
Spain
Local time: 16:02
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in CatalanCatalan, Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Simon Bruni: or "root cause of it"
0 min
  -> Thanks, Simon
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57 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
the rotten apple's been removed from the barrel


Explanation:
because everyone knows the effect of leaving the rotten apple in the barrel -- all the others go rotten!

Bobo Lockett
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 151
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
it's best to deal with problems at their source


Explanation:
Harrap's version.

DOUBLE A EN<>ES
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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19 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Dead men tell no tales


Explanation:
I am afraid, to me that is what it means.

English Proverbs | The Phrasefinder
www.phrases.org.uk › Phrase Dictionary - Meanings and Origins

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Note added at 19 hrs (2012-04-22 04:19:58 GMT)
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Also: Ask no questions and hear no lies

axies
Australia
Local time: 23:32
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in category: 24

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dr. Mara Huber
1 day8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Dr. Mara Huber!
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