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abolardado

English translation: moored

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:abolardado
English translation:moored
Entered by: S Ben Price
Options:
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17:43 Feb 21, 2008
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering - Ships, Sailing, Maritime
Spanish term or phrase: abolardado
No context, no idea. This should probably be worth at least a thousand kudoz points, not 4. It is in a glossary for a massive naval (warship) document. The full entry is
- buque abolardado
buque is ship or vessel
S Ben Price
Spain
Local time: 00:11
moored
Explanation:
According to the María Moliner, "bolardo" comes from the English word "bollard". Bollards are the posts found on docks and ships and are used to tie up, or moor, ships.
Selected response from:

Rob Lunn
Spain
Local time: 00:11
Grading comment
Thanks, I was hopelessly lost on this one
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +2moored
Rob Lunn
2moored (to a bollard)
Kathryn Litherland
2bell-shaped
dcanossa


  

Answers


25 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
abocardado
bell-shaped


Explanation:
la palabra es "abocardado", pero sin contexto es muy dificil saber a que se refiere... pero quiza se refiera a la forma del buque, donde la punta tiene forma de campana. suerte!

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Note added at 26 minutos (2008-02-21 18:09:52 GMT)
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por cierto... con "la punta" me referia a la proa... :)

dcanossa
Spain
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
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28 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
moored


Explanation:
According to the María Moliner, "bolardo" comes from the English word "bollard". Bollards are the posts found on docks and ships and are used to tie up, or moor, ships.

Rob Lunn
Spain
Local time: 00:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks, I was hopelessly lost on this one

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Jaime Castro
1 hr
  -> Thanks Jaime

agree  Terry Burgess: Now THAT makes sense!
1 hr
  -> I hope so! Thanks Terry
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
moored (to a bollard)


Explanation:
This guess is based on the English term "bollard," http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bollard
and the fact that I did find reference to "abolar" as a Portuguese term meaning to anchor to a mooring in some ancient Portuguese dictionary glimpsed darkly through Google books: http://books.google.com/books?um=1&q=abolar barsa&btnG=Searc...

Kathryn Litherland
United States
Local time: 18:11
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 8
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