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navegar amurados a la mar

English translation: see answer on your Eng. question

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07:45 Mar 8, 2004
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Ships, Sailing, Maritime
Spanish term or phrase: navegar amurados a la mar
AMURAR (from DRAE): "Llevar a donde corresponde, a barlovento, los puños de las velas que admiten esta maniobra, y sujetarlos con la ***amura*** para que las velas queden bien orientadas cuando se ha de navegar de bolina".

CONTEXT: se deberá procurar ***navegar amurados a la mar*** y a velocidad moderada en estas condiciones (= mal tiempo).

The translation provided is: try to ***stay tick over tack..***

I haven't been able to find much that was explanatory on ***navegar amurados a la mar*** and nothing on ***stay tick over tack..***

TIA:-)
xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 09:13
English translation:see answer on your Eng. question
Explanation:
You can see what happens if people try to get hold of nautical dictionaries and nautical terms....
You already have the right explanation in an answer to your English-English question.
The Spanish: (also not quite clear, but anyway)(Your dictionary makes no sense to me) (sailing experience in Spain with Catalans/Spanish terminology)
- amurado = tack (port or starboard tack)
See: Amurado a estribor: El viento llega del costado de estribor. Cuando es difícil decir si viene del costado izquierdo o derecho, se está amurado a estribor si la mayor se infla hacia el costado de babor . http://www.velarc.com/reglmtos.htm
(and many other sites with 'rules of the road' and regattas)
It will not surprise you now that
Amura -> Parte delantera del costado de un barco
There is no exact English equivalent of it, it is part of the bow.

It is clear that in a powerboat you can not be on one or another tack though I must confess I have never been a powerboater.

See the correct answer on your English question.

Good sailing!

Anjo

RYA Yachtmaster Offshore, Lots of sailing on lots of yachts in dutch, English and Spanish
Selected response from:

Anjo Sterringa
Spain
Local time: 09:13
Grading comment
Giles was right on course too, but the problem is that this is a motorboat without sails so even though these boats inherit sailing terminology, I think one has to choose a right balance in terms of wording. All the refs to 'amurar' (as in the DRAE) refer specifically to sails and manoeuvres with sails. I visited the nautical bookshop this morning here in BCN and they clarified my thinking too (great shop & great people!), we agreed that what was meant was to work (partially sideways perhaps?) against the wind in order to keep the boat on an even keel, quite logical right? The idea that 'amura' is part of the side of the boat was the clue they gave me, which Anjo has confirmed (Ribelles translates it simply as 'bow', Martinez Hidalgo y Teran has an explanation that is quite explicit, basically that it is the point where the bow begins to narrow, but also translates it as 'bow', even FR is more specific: quartier d'avant ). I haven't decided yet how to translate it, but now that the meaning has been clarified....

Thanks to all for their help, especially Giles and Anjo. Sorry that I can't award both of you points:-)
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5 +2to tack (or sail close-hauled)
Giles Bickford
4see answer on your Eng. question
Anjo Sterringa
5 -2Navigate protected (fortified) in seaxxxAlex Zelkind


Discussion entries: 4





  

Answers


11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): -2
Navigate protected (fortified) in sea


Explanation:
Amura - protection, armor, barrier, screen

xxxAlex Zelkind
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
disagree  Giles Bickford: I think this has nothing to do with has nothing with walls. The "mura" is the tack of a sail
40 mins

disagree  MJ Barber: isn't amura the bow?
2 hrs
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51 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
to tack (or sail close-hauled)


Explanation:
This has nothing to do with "walls" or "fortifications". The "mura" is the tack of a sail (i.e. the rope for securing the corner of the sail (Oxford dictionary). The manoeuvre of tacking is to sail into the wind, or, as the Oxofrd has it "change a ship's course by running its head to the wind". The closer you get the the wind's direction (close-hauled), the faster you will go, but in foul weather this is a tricky business.

Giles Bickford
United Kingdom
Local time: 08:13
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  xxxelpincha: http://66.102.9.104/search?q=cache:yCIuulD3e5MJ:www.rfev.es/...
1 hr

agree  Vicky Papaprodromou
2 hrs
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
see answer on your Eng. question


Explanation:
You can see what happens if people try to get hold of nautical dictionaries and nautical terms....
You already have the right explanation in an answer to your English-English question.
The Spanish: (also not quite clear, but anyway)(Your dictionary makes no sense to me) (sailing experience in Spain with Catalans/Spanish terminology)
- amurado = tack (port or starboard tack)
See: Amurado a estribor: El viento llega del costado de estribor. Cuando es difícil decir si viene del costado izquierdo o derecho, se está amurado a estribor si la mayor se infla hacia el costado de babor . http://www.velarc.com/reglmtos.htm
(and many other sites with 'rules of the road' and regattas)
It will not surprise you now that
Amura -> Parte delantera del costado de un barco
There is no exact English equivalent of it, it is part of the bow.

It is clear that in a powerboat you can not be on one or another tack though I must confess I have never been a powerboater.

See the correct answer on your English question.

Good sailing!

Anjo

RYA Yachtmaster Offshore, Lots of sailing on lots of yachts in dutch, English and Spanish

Anjo Sterringa
Spain
Local time: 09:13
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in DutchDutch
PRO pts in category: 21
Grading comment
Giles was right on course too, but the problem is that this is a motorboat without sails so even though these boats inherit sailing terminology, I think one has to choose a right balance in terms of wording. All the refs to 'amurar' (as in the DRAE) refer specifically to sails and manoeuvres with sails. I visited the nautical bookshop this morning here in BCN and they clarified my thinking too (great shop & great people!), we agreed that what was meant was to work (partially sideways perhaps?) against the wind in order to keep the boat on an even keel, quite logical right? The idea that 'amura' is part of the side of the boat was the clue they gave me, which Anjo has confirmed (Ribelles translates it simply as 'bow', Martinez Hidalgo y Teran has an explanation that is quite explicit, basically that it is the point where the bow begins to narrow, but also translates it as 'bow', even FR is more specific: quartier d'avant ). I haven't decided yet how to translate it, but now that the meaning has been clarified....

Thanks to all for their help, especially Giles and Anjo. Sorry that I can't award both of you points:-)
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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