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orale carnal

English translation: ok, bro

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21:12 Feb 14, 2004
Spanish to English translations [Non-PRO]
Slang
Spanish term or phrase: orale carnal
A friend asked me to transcribe a short fragment of the film "Blood In Blood Out". The characters are Hispanic prisoners in America and I'm pretty sure one of them says "orale carnal" at one point. I have found out the meaning of "carnal" in prison slang:
Carnal: Homeboy. Street Language. (Sp.)
http://dictionary.prisonwall.org/
Carnal - Hispanic prison/street gang member; a brother
http://www.gangsorus.com/lettersa.html
But I still don't understand the meaning of the phrase. Can someone please explain? Here's the dialogue:
Miklo: OK, Popeye. There’ll be a blank space next to your name in my book. I’ll keep it up here, in my memory.
Popeye: Orale carnal. I’ll be tiding good when you get out. Whatever you want, just ask.
Hanna Burdon
United Kingdom
Local time: 00:35
English translation:ok, bro
Explanation:
"orale" is a very hard word to translate, and it depends on the context it is said, it can be translated as "OK" but also can be something as "let's go", or "hurry up" or "wait and you'll see", as I said before, it all depends.
"Carnal" means "Bro", as it has already been mentioned,it has the meaning of a brother, and also a friend who is very close, like a brother. "Hermano Carnal" is a brother who comes from the same mother and father as opposed to an adopted child who becomes your brother, therefore, the meaning, even when used to address a friend, is the one of a person who is really, very close to you.
I wish we had more context to let you know what the person means when saying that phrase

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Note added at 2004-02-15 15:58:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have tried to find a closer menaning for \"órale\", an American friend of mine who learned Spanish in Mexico defined it as: \"you never know the exact meaning of \"orale\" until you get to use it\". In this context, I agree it can be just \"OK\" but, is there a more \"slangy\" way to say OK?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-02-15 15:59:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I woul add it is a \"strong OK\" , very much from the heart, if you know what I mean
Selected response from:

Maria Lemus
Local time: 18:35
Grading comment
Thank you, your explanations and suggestions have been very helpful.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4ok, broMaria Lemus
5 +2OK, brotherxxxLia Fail
5100Dalia Lozman
3 +2Está bien mi hermano, estare esperando mi hermanoluzba
4thanks, bud!
George Rabel


Discussion entries: 2





  

Answers


7 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
Está bien mi hermano, estare esperando mi hermano


Explanation:
Es una expresión aprobando lo que el otro le está diciendo.

luzba
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Cecilia Della Croce: It is like saying: Ok, bro (in Mexican Spanish, isn't it?)
3 mins
  -> That's correct, it means ok, bro

agree  Gabriel Aramburo Siegert
8 hrs
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18 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +2
OK, brother


Explanation:



Que le watcha a mis trapos,ese?- What are you looking at, on my clothes? (25)

Sabe que, ***carnal?- You know what brother? (25)

Estas garras me las plante porque vamos a dejarnos caer un play, sabe?- This clothes I’m wearing, because we are doing a play, do you know? (25)

Watcha mi tacuche, ese.- Check out my suit dude (25)

Pos ***orale!- well okay (26)

Y en todos los salones de Chicago- and in all the ballrooms in Chicago (27)

Trucha la jura. Pelenle!- watch out the police run (27)

etc.........

FROM: http://www.google.es/search?q=cache:-jkq1675gLcJ:www.msmc.la...

Valdez Glossary

xxxLia Fail
Spain
Local time: 01:35
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Eckhard Boehle
1 hr

agree  Gabriel Aramburo Siegert
8 hrs
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32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
ok, bro


Explanation:
"orale" is a very hard word to translate, and it depends on the context it is said, it can be translated as "OK" but also can be something as "let's go", or "hurry up" or "wait and you'll see", as I said before, it all depends.
"Carnal" means "Bro", as it has already been mentioned,it has the meaning of a brother, and also a friend who is very close, like a brother. "Hermano Carnal" is a brother who comes from the same mother and father as opposed to an adopted child who becomes your brother, therefore, the meaning, even when used to address a friend, is the one of a person who is really, very close to you.
I wish we had more context to let you know what the person means when saying that phrase

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-02-15 15:58:17 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I have tried to find a closer menaning for \"órale\", an American friend of mine who learned Spanish in Mexico defined it as: \"you never know the exact meaning of \"orale\" until you get to use it\". In this context, I agree it can be just \"OK\" but, is there a more \"slangy\" way to say OK?

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2004-02-15 15:59:09 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I woul add it is a \"strong OK\" , very much from the heart, if you know what I mean

Maria Lemus
Local time: 18:35
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
Grading comment
Thank you, your explanations and suggestions have been very helpful.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Juan Jacob: Absolutamente: could be Hurry up, wait and you'll se, ok, thanks, c'mon bro. It's not "hispanic": absolutely mexican or american-mexican.
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Juan, it is pure mexican and mexican-american, as far as I know, you're right

agree  verbis
2 hrs
  -> Thank you, Verbis

agree  Gabriel Aramburo Siegert: Any of these...
8 hrs
  -> Thank you, Gabriel

agree  Refugio: But Hanna should be aware that carnal isn't just prison slang, it is widely used in neighborhoods and even in college.
9 hrs
  -> That's correct, Ruth, and thank you. Even "educated" people use it sometimes to express such closeness to someone else!
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
thanks, bud!


Explanation:
All of the other contributions are fine. This is an alternative. Considering the context, where appreciation is being expressed, I'd go for "thanks".
Carnal could be Bro, Bud, Homey, Man, etc...but thinking again, I'd probably leave it in Spanish.
"Thanks, Carnal!" to leave in the ethnic flavor

George Rabel
Local time: 19:35
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 11
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3609 days   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
100


Explanation:
Hello guys!
I am mexican, so I can explain the meanings:
All meaning before said are right.
Orale= has 3 meanings: ok, hurry up and wow, depending the context Example:
1.-
-I travelled 30 hours by airplain
-Orale! (wow), too much time

2.-Mom to kids
-Orale (hurry up) kids, we are late this morning, the bus will leave us

3.- Friends
-What do you think about meeting next saturday?
-Orale! (ok) I am agree



Dalia Lozman
Mexico
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