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niños/as adolescentes y jóvenes

English translation: children and adolescents / children and teenagers

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10:56 Oct 30, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Social Sciences - Social Science, Sociology, Ethics, etc. / Social Services
Spanish term or phrase: niños/as adolescentes y jóvenes
This is from material regarding a program for street children. I am editing the translation, and the above appears innumerable times (the translation follows). I think the Spanish is from Central America or Mexico.

"...una política sobre la accesibilidad a los servicios que proporcion XYZ organización a los niños/as adolescentes y jóvenes..."
("...provides a policy on access to the service for teenage and young children...")

"Ningún niño adolescente y joven..."
("No teenage and young child...")

"...los niños adolescente y joven...[sic]"
("...teenage and young children...)

"Los niños/as, adolescentes y jóvenes una vez que..."
"Once the teenage and young children.."

I've given the three examples to demonstrate the quality of the original and the trans.

The organization's services are directed towards street kids up to the age of 18.

Based on the above, would it make more sense to translate "niños/as adolescentes y jóvenes"
as "young children and teenagers"?

Or (based on qualilty of original and the evidence above) should it be

"children, teenagers and youths/young people"?

I have the strong impression that there should be a comma between niños/as and adolescentes (niños/as, adolescentes) as in the last example above; does anyone agree?

TIA

Liz
Elizabeth Joy Pitt de Morales
Local time: 04:16
English translation:children and adolescents / children and teenagers
Explanation:
Hi Liz,

First of all, see this page:
http://www.unicef.org/lac/flash/DW/dia_de_la_juventud.html

For some reason, I can't copy it directly, but in the 5th para it quotes the U.N. as "generally considering "joven" as an individual between 15 and 24.

Considering that your organisation focuses on kids up to the age of 18, I would say that while your text DOES MEAN to imply "older children" when using the term "jóvenes", it isn't really necessary and isn't precise either.

If you use the term "adolescent" you are automatically including any person up to 19 years old and, if you so wish, can always use older adolescent. In the cases where all age groups are mentioned I certainly don't feel that you need to underline "older adolescent". Consider the following:

The official UN working definition of "adolescent," as set forth jointly by UNFPA, UNICEF and the World Health Organization, is the age group 10-19
http://www.lifesite.net/ldn/1999/feb/990212b.html

The United Nations General Assembly defined ‘youth’, as those persons falling between the ages of 15 and 24 years inclusive. All United Nations statistics on youth are based on this definition
By that definition, therefore, children are those persons under the age of 14. It is, however, worth noting that Article 1 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child defines ‘children’ as persons up to the age of 18
http://dancolombia.blogspot.com/

I haven't found the U.N. to be quoted for a definition of "young adult", but I would usually understand it as a synonym of youth, wherefore you'd be targeting an age group that is different to the group your organisation works with.

Therefore I'd go for either of the above and, where you feel it is absolutely necessary, you can specify "older adolescents/teenagers" considering that "teenager" automatically implies 13-19.

Finally, if you still feel uneasy about the terms, I wouldn't hesitate to ask the organisation. Although they might focus on under 18's, this might not completely exclude young adults or they might have their own particular reasons for using the term and thus want it to be conveyed in the translation.
This is something that you simply cannot know - after all, you're a translator, not a mind reader!

Good luck!

Álvaro :O) :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-10-30 12:11:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi Liz. Sorry, I'd spent some time writing that answer and hadn't seen your comment. Personally, I couldn't agree more - this does seem to be an extra effort to appear inclusive. However, as I said earlier, if you feel uneasy about it you can always ask. :O)
Selected response from:

moken
Local time: 03:16
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
4 +2children and adolescents / children and teenagers
moken
4 +1children, adolescents and young peopleJoss Heywood
5children, teenagers and youngsters
Adriana Rubinstein
3 +2children, teenagers and youths
Mónica Algazi
4(young) adolescents and (older) youths OR: young and older adolescents
Muriel Vasconcellos
4children and young peoplecanaria
4pubescent children, adolescents and young adults
Carmen Schultz
4children, adolescents/teenagers and young adults
maryblack


Discussion entries: 5





  

Answers


3 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
children, adolescents/teenagers and young adults


Explanation:
I find that "joven" is what we would refer to as university age - around 18-22. And you're right - there should be a comma between niños/as and adolescentes. Adolescents if the text is more formal, and teenagers if it's less so. Best of luck!

maryblack
United States
Local time: 21:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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10 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
pubescent children, adolescents and young adults


Explanation:
I think they are using 'niños adolescentes' (children having reached puberty) as one term witout the comma to distinguish from "older adolescents"

Carmen Schultz
Local time: 21:16
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
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12 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +2
children, teenagers and youths


Explanation:
If, on the other hand, there is no comma missing in "niños adolescentes", just "teenagers and youths".

Mónica Algazi
Uruguay
Local time: 23:16
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  vhernriq: I agree
1 min
  -> Gracias, Victoria.

agree  Carol Gullidge: ... and youths/young people (either!) - but, perhaps "young people" in any case is an umbrella term, i.e., redudant when all 3 terms are used together
7 hrs
  -> Thanks, Carol.
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24 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
children and young people


Explanation:
In local government departments in the UK, no distinction is normally made between teenagers and young adults - you can safely say 'children and young people'

canaria
United Kingdom
Local time: 03:16
Native speaker of: English
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45 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +1
children, adolescents and young people


Explanation:
check it out on the respective UNFPA sites - there IS a comma after niños/as [696 hits for unfpa "niños/as adolescentes y jóvenes", all with the comma]. UNFPA also has (overlapping) definitions for each age group

Example sentence(s):
  • UNFPA Reproductive Health Employment: Implications for Young people UNFPA ..... globally - equivalent to 565 children, adolescents and young people aged
  • he United Nations Population Fund - UNFPA - works to ensure universal ... redes de defensa de los derechos humanos de los niños/as, adolescentes y jóvenes, ...

    Reference: http://ecuador.unfpa.org/delitosexuales.htm
    Reference: http://www.unfpa.org/adolescents/FinalKS/fast_facts.htm
Joss Heywood
Local time: 23:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 19

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Marcela Dutra: I do quite a bit of translating for an OAS specialized organization and this is exactly what they use.
4 hrs
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1 hr   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5 peer agreement (net): +2
children and adolescents / children and teenagers


Explanation:
Hi Liz,

First of all, see this page:
http://www.unicef.org/lac/flash/DW/dia_de_la_juventud.html

For some reason, I can't copy it directly, but in the 5th para it quotes the U.N. as "generally considering "joven" as an individual between 15 and 24.

Considering that your organisation focuses on kids up to the age of 18, I would say that while your text DOES MEAN to imply "older children" when using the term "jóvenes", it isn't really necessary and isn't precise either.

If you use the term "adolescent" you are automatically including any person up to 19 years old and, if you so wish, can always use older adolescent. In the cases where all age groups are mentioned I certainly don't feel that you need to underline "older adolescent". Consider the following:

The official UN working definition of "adolescent," as set forth jointly by UNFPA, UNICEF and the World Health Organization, is the age group 10-19
http://www.lifesite.net/ldn/1999/feb/990212b.html

The United Nations General Assembly defined ‘youth’, as those persons falling between the ages of 15 and 24 years inclusive. All United Nations statistics on youth are based on this definition
By that definition, therefore, children are those persons under the age of 14. It is, however, worth noting that Article 1 of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child defines ‘children’ as persons up to the age of 18
http://dancolombia.blogspot.com/

I haven't found the U.N. to be quoted for a definition of "young adult", but I would usually understand it as a synonym of youth, wherefore you'd be targeting an age group that is different to the group your organisation works with.

Therefore I'd go for either of the above and, where you feel it is absolutely necessary, you can specify "older adolescents/teenagers" considering that "teenager" automatically implies 13-19.

Finally, if you still feel uneasy about the terms, I wouldn't hesitate to ask the organisation. Although they might focus on under 18's, this might not completely exclude young adults or they might have their own particular reasons for using the term and thus want it to be conveyed in the translation.
This is something that you simply cannot know - after all, you're a translator, not a mind reader!

Good luck!

Álvaro :O) :O)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2007-10-30 12:11:05 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Hi Liz. Sorry, I'd spent some time writing that answer and hadn't seen your comment. Personally, I couldn't agree more - this does seem to be an extra effort to appear inclusive. However, as I said earlier, if you feel uneasy about it you can always ask. :O)

moken
Local time: 03:16
Native speaker of: Spanish
PRO pts in category: 47
Grading comment
Selected automatically based on peer agreement.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Alice Zuzek
17 mins
  -> :O)

agree  Pilar Díez
22 hrs
  -> :O)
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2 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
children, teenagers and youngsters


Explanation:
I chose youngsters: young person of either sex and this term is used by many NGOs such as UNHCR

Example sentence(s):
  • The study did not determine whether the youngsters were properly diagnosed and treated
  • Colombian youngsters hope education will give them a life without bullets

    Reference: http://www.childdevelopmentinfo.com/health_safety/nutrition....
    Reference: http://www.reliefweb.int/rw/RWB.NSF/db900SID/EVOD-77MGWW?Ope...
Adriana Rubinstein
Argentina
Local time: 23:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Chris Russell: "Youngster" is a very informal word. This is fine for the style of the first article (mass-market parenting advice), but it might not fit the tone of the document in question.
1 hr
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17 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
(young) adolescents and (older) youths OR: young and older adolescents


Explanation:
I've run into the same problem. For certain "ninos" is not a separate, item in the list so "children" is out of the picture.

The two terms are really almost synonymous, and some definitions are the same for both. The definitions are enough to drive one crazy. For "youth" one def. says 11-15 and another says under 21. One def. for adolescents is up to 19.

Muriel Vasconcellos
United States
Local time: 19:16
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 277
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