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FLUDO TERMICO DIFENILO

English translation: diphenyl-containing heat transfer fluid

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:FLUDO TERMICO DIFENILO
English translation:diphenyl-containing heat transfer fluid
Entered by: Maria Luisa Duarte
Options:
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- Include in personal glossary

08:06 May 24, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Tech/Engineering
Spanish term or phrase: FLUDO TERMICO DIFENILO
GENERACION DE FLUDO TERMICO DIFENILO PARA CONSUMO EN PLANTA.
Neil Rear
United Kingdom
Local time: 09:18
diphenyl-containing heat transfer fluid
Explanation:
heat transfer fluids

Use Of Heat Transfer Fluids. Most of the heat transfer fluids used today are mineral oils or synthetic hydrocarbons. Isomers and diphenyl—diphenyl oxide are also occasionally used. Other types of fluids are available for special applications. What makes these fluids better than steam for heating purposes? First, the economy and safety of a low pressure system can be realized, since the temperature is not pressure—dependent as in the case of steam. Lower pressure also decreases leakage potential and the possibility of contaminating the product being heated. Many chemicals that would react strongly with water are more compatible with heat transfer fluids. Thermal fluids may be pumped at temperatures below freezing, and have no condensate return lines to freeze. Feed water treatment is Ieliminated. Internal scaling and corrosion are greatly reduced. These fluids do not form a vacuum in the system after shutdown, which would tend to contaminate the fluid. Despite these features, there are some problems with heat transfer fluids that should be understood:

(l) The fluids are combustible, requiring equipment and procedures to minimize fire risk. They also constitute a potential water pollutant.

(2) The fluids may oxidize when exposed to air. Sensitive temperature control is required to prevent boiling, coking, scaling, or fluid deterioration due to high fluid film temperatures in the heater.

(3) Deterioration in service can result in lowering of the flash point and increase in carbon residue.

(4) The fluid should be handled cautiously since exposure to skin, eyes, lungs, or the digestive system can be irritating or cause illness.

(5) Heat transfer fluids have a lower coefficient of heat transfer on the inside tube surface than does steam, necessitating higher operating temperatures or more surface area for the same performance. Fluid circulating pumps can be high maintenance items.

(6) Also, although there are some offsetting factors in the cost of these fluids, they are expensive. Work is being done to develop water—based heat transfer fluids to reduce costs. Water has some advantages over oil in that it has excellent heat transfer properties, low viscosity, low vapor pressure, high thermal conductivity, and high specific heat and density. It is not combustible or toxic. Additives are being developed to reduce its limitations regarding operating temperature, corrosion, freezing, etc. This use of water is promising but has had little success so far. [NOTE: The preceding discussion is intended as an introduction to TFH’s used in marine applications. Large heaters found in the chemical processing industry are normally much more sophisticated in design. Guidelines for inspection of marine TFH’s are now being developed by Commandant CG—MVI) and will be published after related regulation projects are completed.]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 08:48:51 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Understanding Fluid Chemistry
High temperature heat transfer fluids can be categorized by chemical structure into three primary groups (table 1):


Synthetics.

Hot oils.

\"Others,\" including silicones.

Also referred to as \"aromatics,\" the synthetics group of fluids consists of benzene-based structures and includes the diphenyl oxide/biphenyl fluids, diphenylethanes, dibenzyltoluenes and terphenyls. Depending on the specific product, the overall bulk fluid temperature operating range is -70 to 750oF (-56.7 to 399oC).

Hot oils are petroleum-based, and most consist of paraffinic and/or napthenic hydrocarbons. The overall bulk fluid temperature operating range of petroleum-based fluids is -10 to 600oF (-23.3 to 316oC); however, only the high-grade hydrogenated white oils are recommended for applications requiring bulk fluid temperatures in the 575 to 600oF (302 to 316oC) range.

Silicone-based fluids -- and, to a greater extent, hybrid glycol fluids -- are used primarily in specialized applications requiring process and product compatibility should a heat exchanger leak occur. This group\'s performance and cost factor disadvantages -- in the comparative temperature ranges of the synthetics and hot oils -- make silicone-based and other specialty fluids unlikely choices for most process applications.

http://www.process-heating.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/featur...
Selected response from:

Maria Luisa Duarte
Spain
Local time: 10:18
Grading comment
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
5diphenyl-containing heat transfer fluid
Maria Luisa Duarte
4Diphenyl thermal fluid
Rocío Silveira de Andrade


  

Answers


30 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
diphenyl-containing heat transfer fluid


Explanation:
heat transfer fluids

Use Of Heat Transfer Fluids. Most of the heat transfer fluids used today are mineral oils or synthetic hydrocarbons. Isomers and diphenyl—diphenyl oxide are also occasionally used. Other types of fluids are available for special applications. What makes these fluids better than steam for heating purposes? First, the economy and safety of a low pressure system can be realized, since the temperature is not pressure—dependent as in the case of steam. Lower pressure also decreases leakage potential and the possibility of contaminating the product being heated. Many chemicals that would react strongly with water are more compatible with heat transfer fluids. Thermal fluids may be pumped at temperatures below freezing, and have no condensate return lines to freeze. Feed water treatment is Ieliminated. Internal scaling and corrosion are greatly reduced. These fluids do not form a vacuum in the system after shutdown, which would tend to contaminate the fluid. Despite these features, there are some problems with heat transfer fluids that should be understood:

(l) The fluids are combustible, requiring equipment and procedures to minimize fire risk. They also constitute a potential water pollutant.

(2) The fluids may oxidize when exposed to air. Sensitive temperature control is required to prevent boiling, coking, scaling, or fluid deterioration due to high fluid film temperatures in the heater.

(3) Deterioration in service can result in lowering of the flash point and increase in carbon residue.

(4) The fluid should be handled cautiously since exposure to skin, eyes, lungs, or the digestive system can be irritating or cause illness.

(5) Heat transfer fluids have a lower coefficient of heat transfer on the inside tube surface than does steam, necessitating higher operating temperatures or more surface area for the same performance. Fluid circulating pumps can be high maintenance items.

(6) Also, although there are some offsetting factors in the cost of these fluids, they are expensive. Work is being done to develop water—based heat transfer fluids to reduce costs. Water has some advantages over oil in that it has excellent heat transfer properties, low viscosity, low vapor pressure, high thermal conductivity, and high specific heat and density. It is not combustible or toxic. Additives are being developed to reduce its limitations regarding operating temperature, corrosion, freezing, etc. This use of water is promising but has had little success so far. [NOTE: The preceding discussion is intended as an introduction to TFH’s used in marine applications. Large heaters found in the chemical processing industry are normally much more sophisticated in design. Guidelines for inspection of marine TFH’s are now being developed by Commandant CG—MVI) and will be published after related regulation projects are completed.]


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-05-24 08:48:51 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Understanding Fluid Chemistry
High temperature heat transfer fluids can be categorized by chemical structure into three primary groups (table 1):


Synthetics.

Hot oils.

\"Others,\" including silicones.

Also referred to as \"aromatics,\" the synthetics group of fluids consists of benzene-based structures and includes the diphenyl oxide/biphenyl fluids, diphenylethanes, dibenzyltoluenes and terphenyls. Depending on the specific product, the overall bulk fluid temperature operating range is -70 to 750oF (-56.7 to 399oC).

Hot oils are petroleum-based, and most consist of paraffinic and/or napthenic hydrocarbons. The overall bulk fluid temperature operating range of petroleum-based fluids is -10 to 600oF (-23.3 to 316oC); however, only the high-grade hydrogenated white oils are recommended for applications requiring bulk fluid temperatures in the 575 to 600oF (302 to 316oC) range.

Silicone-based fluids -- and, to a greater extent, hybrid glycol fluids -- are used primarily in specialized applications requiring process and product compatibility should a heat exchanger leak occur. This group\'s performance and cost factor disadvantages -- in the comparative temperature ranges of the synthetics and hot oils -- make silicone-based and other specialty fluids unlikely choices for most process applications.

http://www.process-heating.com/CDA/ArticleInformation/featur...


    Reference: http://www.uscg.mil/hq/g-m/nmc/pubs/msm/v4/MSM.IV.CH3.i.htm
    Reference: http://www.radcoind.com/xceltLV.html
Maria Luisa Duarte
Spain
Local time: 10:18
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 3168
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

32 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
Diphenyl thermal fluid


Explanation:
__________

Rocío Silveira de Andrade
Argentina
Local time: 05:18
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in pair: 163
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




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