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12:26 Dec 1, 1999
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Spanish term or phrase: chile
No, it´s not from Spanish into English but the opposite.

This guy´s interviewing BB King and he´s talking about his keyboard player who he claims is great.
BB King: yeah, he´s great. I can hear him saying "Hey BB, my chile" (laughter).

If left it as Chile, people would laugh too :) but might take that as an "albur".

I think it is black lingo, cos BB speaks funny throughout the interview ("we was playing", for instance).
Rafael Arellano
Local time: 00:39

Summary of answers provided
na +1child/ buddy/ palsspillma
naalburEzequiel Quijano
nachildRobert Anderson
namy chile = my childDyran Altenburg
Ivan Costa Pinto



19 mins

I can bet on a corruption of xylo (for xylophone). The guy is probably from the Caribbean where they play marimbas
which are xylophones, and probably this is a common joke. This or the masculine sexual organ...(in the format of a chili pepper - chile)
Ivan Costa-Pinto

Ivan Costa Pinto
United States
Local time: 00:39
Native speaker of: Native in PortuguesePortuguese
PRO pts in pair: 34
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44 mins peer agreement (net): +1
child/ buddy/ pal

I think that this is simply a Southern pronunciation, common among speakers of colloquial English of both African-American and Anglo. ethnic groups, of the word "child". It does not imply youth, but rather affection, and is a term of great endearment. (I am often called "chile" , especially by my Black colleagues here at Xavier University of Louisana (an HBCU), and I am 54 years old!) This indicates a sense of parity, of camaraderie, of real "budiness" and of an almost familial affection. It would make sense that musicians who had worked together for a long time would address each other in this way. I have heard it among women more frequently than among men, but it certainly exists as a term of endearment for people of both genders.


Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Robert Donahue
2046 days
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47 mins
my chile = my child

Seems to be a slang term.

Dyran Altenburg
United States
Local time: 01:39
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish, Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 14
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5 hrs

sspillma is right. I have heard the term for over 50 years. It is a term of endearment for any age, either sex.

Robert Anderson
Local time: 23:39
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 229
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51 days

I think the keyboard player is Hispanic, and he refers exactly to his anatomy.
I am also 54, but have a dirty mind.
To me, it is definitely "un albur"

Ezequiel Quijano
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