ProZ.com global directory of translation services
 The translation workplace
Ideas
KudoZ home » Spanish to English » Transport / Transportation / Shipping

facturación

English translation: checking in

Login or register (free and only takes a few minutes) to participate in this question.

You will also have access to many other tools and opportunities designed for those who have language-related jobs
(or are passionate about them). Participation is free and the site has a strict confidentiality policy.
GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:facturación
English translation:checking in
Entered by: Lisa McCarthy
Options:
- Contribute to this entry
- Include in personal glossary

18:40 Jan 13, 2011
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Transport / Transportation / Shipping
Spanish term or phrase: facturación
I've had a look at the other translation of 'facturación' in the Proz glossary but I'm not sure it means 'invoicing' or 'billing' here. Could it be to do with 'tickets'?

For a UK audience.

MUSEO DEL FERROCARRIL
Situado en la antigua estación de Delicias que está declarada Bien de Interés Cultural, el edificio es un claro ejemplo de la arquitectura del hierro de 1880. Se inauguró como Museo del Ferrocarril en 1984. La parte principal del museo lo ocupa la Sala de Tracción, que muestra más de 30 vehículos, desde locomotoras a vagones de viajeros, de distintas épocas y de gran valor histórico. La Sala de Relojes recoge varios relojes de los que existian en las estaciones de ferrocarril. La sala El viaje recrea los elementos ligados al viaje y a la **facturación** en diversas épocas. Además el museo cuenta con una selección de piezas, elementos, fotografías, recreaciones... que ilustran las diferentes profesiones relacionadas con el ferrocarril a lo largo de su Historia.
Lisa McCarthy
Spain
Local time: 13:26
checking in / registration
Explanation:
More likely to be this, I'd have thought. In the old days of more leisurely and elegant travel you used to check in, and a porter would take charge of your luggage, though I think it was often called "registration".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2011-01-13 18:54:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You still do check in for some trains, like Eurostar; see http://www.seat61.com/London-to-Paris-by-train.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-01-13 19:46:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Noni says, "check(ing) in" has modern resonances of air travel which may not be altogether suitable for this museum context. So how about registering luggage (if this is indeed what it means, which I think it is)? In the context of Lisa's passage, it might go something like: "elements connected with rail travel and registering luggage in various periods".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-01-13 19:59:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The DRAE definitions of “facturar” include: “Registrar, entregar en las estaciones de ferrocarril, aeropuertos, etc., equipajes y mercancías para que sean remitidos a su destino.” RENFE doesn’t do it much nowadays, but they they still say, for example, that the “título de transporte” for long-distance travel must indicate, among other things, “Peso y volumen del equipaje admitido. Precio de facturación (en su caso).” (http://www.renfe.com/empresa/informacion_legal/condiciones_l...
So in principle it’s something that can happen on the railways even now, in the sense we normally associate with air travel.
In the past it was done routinely; there used to be mozos de maletas, porters, everywhere.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2011-01-13 21:44:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The definition quoted above first appeared in the DRAE (without mentioning airports, of course) in 1914: "facturar: Registrar en las estaciones de ferrocarriles equipajes o mercancías para que sean remitidos a su destino" (http://buscon.rae.es/ntlle/SrvltGUIMenuNtlle?cmd=Lema&sec=1.... Until the 1989 edition, the definition mentioned only railway stations; "aeropuertos, etc." was added in 1992. So for all that time, "facturar" meant checking in luggage at a railway station. The only other things it meant, according to the RAE, were "extender las facturas" and "comprender en ellas cada artículo, bulto u objeto": in other words, billing or invoicing. (It so happens that a train ticket is not an invoice for tax purposes, but that's another story.)

Does this definition apply to passenger travel? I think so. "Mercancías" certainly suggests unaccompanied freight, but I don't think "equipaje" can mean anything other than passenger luggage here: "conjunto de cosas que se llevan en los viajes", to quote the RAE once again.

RENFE nowadays uses "facturar/facturación" in only two senses; first, global sales, the sense in which any commercial enterprise uses the word, as for example in "Renfe aumentó un 9,5% la facturación de los trenes AVE y de larga distancia en el primer semestre de 2009" (http://www.eleconomista.es/economia/noticias/1393212/07/09/R... and second, checking in or registration of luggage. I have never heard or seen the word applied to selling tickets to passengers and I don't believe it can have that sense.
Selected response from:

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:26
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles! I think this is the correct term. Didn´t realise the question would create such discussion :) Thanks to all for the help.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
4bookingBill Harrison
4checking in / registration
Charles Davis
3 +1ticketing
Reed D James
Summary of reference entries provided
Booking
Travelin Ann

Discussion entries: 16





  

Answers


8 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
ticketing


Explanation:
Invoicing sounds distinctly "wholesale" to me. Billing sounds like someone is going to send you a bill in the mail or via e-mail now. Based on the context, it really sounds like the museum is capturing the way tickets were issued.

Reed D James
Chile
Local time: 07:26
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  eski: Makes sense to me. Saludos! eski
1 hr

neutral  Bill Harrison: Seems a viable possibility to me. But to use this term when it has such an obvious other meaning in the context of railways seems a bit absurd. And not to say a misuse of the term.
1 hr
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

9 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
checking in / registration


Explanation:
More likely to be this, I'd have thought. In the old days of more leisurely and elegant travel you used to check in, and a porter would take charge of your luggage, though I think it was often called "registration".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 13 mins (2011-01-13 18:54:07 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

You still do check in for some trains, like Eurostar; see http://www.seat61.com/London-to-Paris-by-train.htm


--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-01-13 19:46:37 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

As Noni says, "check(ing) in" has modern resonances of air travel which may not be altogether suitable for this museum context. So how about registering luggage (if this is indeed what it means, which I think it is)? In the context of Lisa's passage, it might go something like: "elements connected with rail travel and registering luggage in various periods".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 1 hr (2011-01-13 19:59:45 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The DRAE definitions of “facturar” include: “Registrar, entregar en las estaciones de ferrocarril, aeropuertos, etc., equipajes y mercancías para que sean remitidos a su destino.” RENFE doesn’t do it much nowadays, but they they still say, for example, that the “título de transporte” for long-distance travel must indicate, among other things, “Peso y volumen del equipaje admitido. Precio de facturación (en su caso).” (http://www.renfe.com/empresa/informacion_legal/condiciones_l...
So in principle it’s something that can happen on the railways even now, in the sense we normally associate with air travel.
In the past it was done routinely; there used to be mozos de maletas, porters, everywhere.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 3 hrs (2011-01-13 21:44:21 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

The definition quoted above first appeared in the DRAE (without mentioning airports, of course) in 1914: "facturar: Registrar en las estaciones de ferrocarriles equipajes o mercancías para que sean remitidos a su destino" (http://buscon.rae.es/ntlle/SrvltGUIMenuNtlle?cmd=Lema&sec=1.... Until the 1989 edition, the definition mentioned only railway stations; "aeropuertos, etc." was added in 1992. So for all that time, "facturar" meant checking in luggage at a railway station. The only other things it meant, according to the RAE, were "extender las facturas" and "comprender en ellas cada artículo, bulto u objeto": in other words, billing or invoicing. (It so happens that a train ticket is not an invoice for tax purposes, but that's another story.)

Does this definition apply to passenger travel? I think so. "Mercancías" certainly suggests unaccompanied freight, but I don't think "equipaje" can mean anything other than passenger luggage here: "conjunto de cosas que se llevan en los viajes", to quote the RAE once again.

RENFE nowadays uses "facturar/facturación" in only two senses; first, global sales, the sense in which any commercial enterprise uses the word, as for example in "Renfe aumentó un 9,5% la facturación de los trenes AVE y de larga distancia en el primer semestre de 2009" (http://www.eleconomista.es/economia/noticias/1393212/07/09/R... and second, checking in or registration of luggage. I have never heard or seen the word applied to selling tickets to passengers and I don't believe it can have that sense.

Charles Davis
Spain
Local time: 13:26
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 72
Grading comment
Thanks, Charles! I think this is the correct term. Didn´t realise the question would create such discussion :) Thanks to all for the help.

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
neutral  Bill Harrison: PS. I have now found a bit more context we were not provided with which DOES suggest ticketing. Without this context I would agree with you entirely. I think maybe now that checking is better, in the more American sense of 'checking luggage'.
3 mins
  -> Thanks, Bill

neutral  Reed D James: But if it says "diversas épocas", then it does include our modern ticketing. Shouldn't it be included?
7 mins
  -> I think "checking-in" or "check-in" would cover the process of presenting yourself, showing your ticket and (perhaps) having someone take charge of your luggage, in any period. It still happens like this today in Spain (long-distance/AVE).
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

20 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
booking


Explanation:
This term would cover ticketing as such and also facturacion in the sense of booking goods in/through.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2011-01-14 14:46:57 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

La sala El viaje recrea los elementos ligados al viaje y a la **facturación** en diversas épocas would thus be "The El Viaje hall recreates items linked to booking and travelling in different eras".

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2011-01-14 15:00:24 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Didn't stations use to have 'booking offices'? Maybe still do. And didn't we 'book' our luggage through to Darlington???

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2011-01-14 15:25:19 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

and didn't we 'facturar' our luggage through the 'booking office'? Must be getting old, I seem to remember the 1950s with increasing clarity.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 20 hrs (2011-01-14 15:32:28 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Ah, some examples.
How we can help you on your walk along the South West Coast Path

"Luggage Transfers offers a quality luggage transfer service along the entire South West Coast Path from Minehead to Poole.
Booking Office opens Monday to Saturday, 9am to 9pm. Next day bookings welcome

One of our drivers will pick up your luggage on the day of transfer and will have it safely dropped off at your destination by 4pm, easily in time for your arrival.

Our charge structure is based on the number of bags being transferred, however each individual bag that exceeds 25kg will be subject to a surcharge. See our"
http://www.luggagetransfers.co.uk/luggage-transfers.php

and
Welcome to The Booking Office.

The aim of this site is to provide a sort of primer for anyone interested in British railway tickets and to illustrate in high resolution, the various ticket types that have existed over the years.
http://therailticketgallery.fotopic.net/

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 21 hrs (2011-01-14 15:56:38 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

I guess the Indians are still a bit old-fashioned, railway-wise:
"INDIAN RAILWAY LUGGAGE OFFICE Complaints - IRRESPOSIBILITY OF RAILWAY LUGGAGE BOOKING OFFICE"
http://www.consumercomplaints.in/complaints/indian-railway-l...

Bill Harrison
Local time: 12:26
Meets criteria
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Reference comments


10 mins
Reference: Booking

Reference information:
This particular reference gives "booking of goods" but I think it might work as well for booking a passage/ticketing.


    Reference: http://books.google.com/books?id=ZIU4-UjfzYcC&lpg=PA169&ots=...
Travelin Ann
United States
Meets criteria
Works in field
Native speaker of: English
PRO pts in category: 2

Peer comments on this reference comment (and responses from the reference poster)
neutral  Bill Harrison: I think on reflection that booking can be a synonym for checking in goods and also covers ticketing. I think this is the best term.
6 mins
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)




Return to KudoZ list


KudoZ™ translation help
The KudoZ network provides a framework for translators and others to assist each other with translations or explanations of terms and short phrases.



See also: