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cortina de burbuja

English translation: effervecence

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:cortina de burbuja
English translation:effervecence
Entered by: Kurt Hackbarth
Options:
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19:40 Oct 26, 2007
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Wine / Oenology / Viticulture
Spanish term or phrase: cortina de burbuja
Talking about different champagnes, as in these examples:

Servido en la copa, este champagne francés se presenta con un seductor tono dorado, con iridiscencias lima. Su cortina de burbuja es muy cuidada, de buen calibre y corona delicada.

OR

Se presenta en la copa con un seductor dorado intenso, con destellos color jade. Adecuada cortina de burbuja, de buen calibre y de corona abundante.

I was wondering if "cortina" should even be translated at all, instead just translating "burbuja" into mousse, fuzz, or bubble, etc. But then I thought "cortina" might be there for a reason....

Many thanks.
Kurt Hackbarth
Local time: 23:22
effervecence
Explanation:
Creo que no hay un equivalente para "cortina de burbujas" (las líneas de burbujas que se deslizan a lo largo de la copa y que desembocan en la superficie formando la corona). Quizás effervecence sea una traducción aproximada.

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Note added at 6 hrs (2007-10-27 02:06:35 GMT)
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Quizás "clockwise pattern of bubbles" as in this link:

A team of scientists from universities in France and Brazil have developed a theory that explains the patterns of fine bubbles that arise in a freshly poured glass of champagne.

The bubble patterns evolve as the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide changes in the glass. They start out as strings of bubbles that rise in pairs, then gradually transition to bubbles in groups of threes, and finally settle down in a clockwork pattern of regularly spaced individual bubbles.

The researchers observed the carbon dioxide bubbles in a champagne glass as they rise from nucleation points on the glass wall. The nucleation points are small defects in the glass that trap tiny vibrating pockets of carbon dioxide. Dissolved gas in the champagne gradually collects in a vibrating bubble inside the defect, causing it to grow and soon expel gas from the defect, forming another bubble that sticks to the outside of the defect. That bubble, in turn, grows as more dissolved carbon dioxide collects inside it and it eventually breaks free of the defect to rise through the champagne. Then the process begins again with a new bubble expelled from the defect, forming rising strings of tiny bubbles.

The patterns are determined by the vibration rate of the gas trapped in the defect and the growth rate of the bubbles outside the defect, which are in turn determined by such things as the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the champagne, the champagne temperature, and the size of the nucleation defect in the glass, among other factors.

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Science_of_champagne_bubbles_exp...

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Note added at 6 hrs (2007-10-27 02:08:44 GMT)
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RISING STRING OF (TINY) BUBBLES is another good option taken from this text
Selected response from:

Marina Menendez
Argentina
Local time: 01:22
Grading comment
Thanks to all!
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3bubble ring/ bubble collar
Kate Major
3effervecence
Marina Menendez
2bubble curtain
Chris Bruton


  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
bubble ring/ bubble collar


Explanation:
I've seen these used by eine critics and they do appear on the net but I'm not entirely sure they correspond to 'cortina'. Have a look. Good luck. :)

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Note added at 47 mins (2007-10-26 20:28:31 GMT)
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sorry should read 'wine critics' of course!:)


    www.ajevonline.org/cgi/reprint/53/2/151.pdf 'A bubble ring (the so-called collar) at the periphery of a flute'
Kate Major
Spain
Local time: 06:22
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in category: 4

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  bigedsenior
49 mins
  -> Thank you! :)

disagree  Marina Menendez: Bubble ring/collar es lo que se forma en la circunferencia de la superficie. Es decir, la corona
5 hrs
  -> Could be- as I say, not entirely sure. As you say below, there might not be an exact equivalent. 'Effervecence' might be a good general term. Thanks for feedback! :)
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6 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
effervecence


Explanation:
Creo que no hay un equivalente para "cortina de burbujas" (las líneas de burbujas que se deslizan a lo largo de la copa y que desembocan en la superficie formando la corona). Quizás effervecence sea una traducción aproximada.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-10-27 02:06:35 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

Quizás "clockwise pattern of bubbles" as in this link:

A team of scientists from universities in France and Brazil have developed a theory that explains the patterns of fine bubbles that arise in a freshly poured glass of champagne.

The bubble patterns evolve as the amount of dissolved carbon dioxide changes in the glass. They start out as strings of bubbles that rise in pairs, then gradually transition to bubbles in groups of threes, and finally settle down in a clockwork pattern of regularly spaced individual bubbles.

The researchers observed the carbon dioxide bubbles in a champagne glass as they rise from nucleation points on the glass wall. The nucleation points are small defects in the glass that trap tiny vibrating pockets of carbon dioxide. Dissolved gas in the champagne gradually collects in a vibrating bubble inside the defect, causing it to grow and soon expel gas from the defect, forming another bubble that sticks to the outside of the defect. That bubble, in turn, grows as more dissolved carbon dioxide collects inside it and it eventually breaks free of the defect to rise through the champagne. Then the process begins again with a new bubble expelled from the defect, forming rising strings of tiny bubbles.

The patterns are determined by the vibration rate of the gas trapped in the defect and the growth rate of the bubbles outside the defect, which are in turn determined by such things as the pressure of the atmosphere on the surface of the champagne, the champagne temperature, and the size of the nucleation defect in the glass, among other factors.

http://en.wikinews.org/wiki/Science_of_champagne_bubbles_exp...

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 6 hrs (2007-10-27 02:08:44 GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

RISING STRING OF (TINY) BUBBLES is another good option taken from this text

Marina Menendez
Argentina
Local time: 01:22
Native speaker of: Native in SpanishSpanish
PRO pts in category: 12
Grading comment
Thanks to all!
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

18 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 2/5Answerer confidence 2/5
bubble curtain


Explanation:
As there seems to be no obvious equivalent in English, why not use the literal translation?

Chris Bruton
United States
Local time: 23:22
Works in field
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
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