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blyspets- eller halvmantlad ammunition

English translation: semi-jacketed

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GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Swedish term or phrase:halvmantlad
English translation:semi-jacketed
Entered by: xxxgeraldkimb
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08:35 Jun 3, 2002
Swedish to English translations [PRO]
Military / Defense / war
Swedish term or phrase: blyspets- eller halvmantlad ammunition
the Geneva Conventions prohibit the use of...
xxxgeraldkimb
Local time: 12:09
lead-tipped or semi-jacketed ammunition
Explanation:
"lead point" (no hyphen) and "half-jacketed" are used as well, but less frequently, according to search hits.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-03 11:50:19 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Andy, you are right, \"soft point\" is more frequently used than either \"lead-tipped\" or \"lead point\".

I\'m no munitions expert, but I think military bullets most often consist of steel or similar hard material. Probably after some vivid documentation I have seen from the 1905 Russo-Japanese war, lead was prohibited because of the horrible wounds they make. They deform on impact and tear up the flesh somewhat dreadfully.

I think the steel may be only a jacket over the lead, though, so there\'s lead on the inside to make it heavier. Semi-jacketed means that the lead bullet is bare, only the explosive part of the cartridge has a steel jacket.
Selected response from:

Lars Finsen
Local time: 12:09
Grading comment
Thanks very much, Lars. I was wondering if one of the terms didn't mean 'dum-dum' and was also confused by 'lead'. Don't all bullets consist of lead?
Many thanks.
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3 +1soft point and half jacketed ammunition
Alasdair Graham-Brown
4lead-tipped or semi-jacketed ammunition
Lars Finsen
4lead- or semi-jacketed ammunition
Mats Wiman


  

Answers


46 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lead- or semi-jacketed ammunition


Explanation:
none

Mats Wiman
Sweden
Local time: 12:09
Specializes in field
Native speaker of: Native in SwedishSwedish
PRO pts in category: 17
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47 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
lead-tipped or semi-jacketed ammunition


Explanation:
"lead point" (no hyphen) and "half-jacketed" are used as well, but less frequently, according to search hits.

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2002-06-03 11:50:19 (GMT) Post-grading
--------------------------------------------------

Andy, you are right, \"soft point\" is more frequently used than either \"lead-tipped\" or \"lead point\".

I\'m no munitions expert, but I think military bullets most often consist of steel or similar hard material. Probably after some vivid documentation I have seen from the 1905 Russo-Japanese war, lead was prohibited because of the horrible wounds they make. They deform on impact and tear up the flesh somewhat dreadfully.

I think the steel may be only a jacket over the lead, though, so there\'s lead on the inside to make it heavier. Semi-jacketed means that the lead bullet is bare, only the explosive part of the cartridge has a steel jacket.

Lars Finsen
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in NorwegianNorwegian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thanks very much, Lars. I was wondering if one of the terms didn't mean 'dum-dum' and was also confused by 'lead'. Don't all bullets consist of lead?
Many thanks.
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49 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5 peer agreement (net): +1
soft point and half jacketed ammunition


Explanation:
This was not easy. If I was translating this,I think I would use the above (in the interests of time). It is not directly wrong, but I am still not 100% certain that these are the 100% correct/perfect transaltions.

Alasdair Graham-Brown
Norway
Local time: 12:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Andy Bell: ...I'd go for soft point in preference to lead point.
29 mins
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