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lansones

English translation: lanzones

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03:28 Jan 20, 2003
Tagalog to English translations [Non-PRO]
Tagalog term or phrase: lansones
Lanzones is a kind of fruit.
English translation:lanzones
Explanation:
"Lansones" or "lanzones" is the common name Filipinos have given to the fruit of the plant, Lansium domesticum (scientific name). This plant is cultivated in tropical climates in Southeast Asia, South America and India.

There is little agreement with regards to the naming of the plant within Southeast Asia alone--in Thailand, it is called longkong or duku; in Malaysia, it is called langsat or duku-langsat; in the Philippines, it is indeed known as lanzones.

However there exists no formally-recognized direct English term for this fruit as yet. Certain quarters contend that the Americans are more prevalently calling this fruit "lanzon", but so far such a term remains unaccepted, if at all unsubstantiated.

By all indications, practically all the existing English terms for this fruit and plant have so far been limited to those that have been derived or adapted phonetically from origin-al nomenclature.

As an example, the supposed term "lanzon" is presumed to have spawned from the Anglicized pronunciation of "lanzones". The original tri-syllabic pronunciation devolved down to two syllables. This was combined with the conversion from what was interpreted to be a plural word form (lanzone-s), into to a singular word form (lanzone)--when in fact the original Tagalog term is a collective (non-count) noun.

As such, if you are to refer to this plant or to its sweet fruit, you may want to use the original Tagalog term "lanzones"--both in form and in sound. After all, chances are you could be referring to a fruit that was harvested Philippines--perhaps even right from its folklore origin, Paete, Laguna! (where the fruit is reportedly becoming hard to come by).

Hope this helps!

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Note added at 2003-01-20 14:26:19 (GMT)
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my apologies for the typo errors above...it seemed my thoughts outpaced my fingers this time?!
Selected response from:

Jake Estrada
Local time: 14:09
Grading comment
Thanks
3 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +1Lansium domesticum Corr., common names: Langsat, Lansek, Lanson, Lanzon, Lanzone
Elisabeth Ghysels
5 +1lanzones
Jake Estrada
4langsat
Daniela Falessi


  

Answers


4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
Lansium domesticum Corr., common names: Langsat, Lansek, Lanson, Lanzon, Lanzone


Explanation:
"Yellow-brown or greenish, round or oval, velvety, hairy, bitter and milky juice, transluscent white flesh, 4 or 5 segments, with large green pips, 1-2 inches long.

Origin
Cambodia, China, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam"

Greetings,

Nikolaus

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Note added at 2003-01-20 08:28:04 (GMT)
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http://pppis.fao.org/GPPIS.exe$ShowHost?Host=2318

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Note added at 2003-01-20 08:34:06 (GMT)
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also known as Duku (together with Langsat and Lanzone):
http://www.crfg.org/pubs/fl/commonDL.html

or Dokong (in Australia, among others):
http://www.aciar.gov.au/publications/proceedings/100/26_Sapi...

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Note added at 2003-01-20 11:23:33 (GMT)
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http://members.tripod.com/da-car/iec/lanzones.htm


    Reference: http://www.cdfa.ca.gov/phpps/pe/page25.htm
    Reference: http://www.asiamaya.com/asiaguide/thailand/e-02trav/et-tr186...
Elisabeth Ghysels
Local time: 07:09

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dia Alibo
2 hrs
  -> thanks
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

4 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 4/5Answerer confidence 4/5
langsat


Explanation:
The langsat originated in western Malaysia and is common both wild and cultivated ...


    Reference: http://www.geocities.com/Athens/Academy/4059/lansones.html
Daniela Falessi
Local time: 07:09
Native speaker of: Native in ItalianItalian
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

5 hrs   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +1
lanzones


Explanation:
"Lansones" or "lanzones" is the common name Filipinos have given to the fruit of the plant, Lansium domesticum (scientific name). This plant is cultivated in tropical climates in Southeast Asia, South America and India.

There is little agreement with regards to the naming of the plant within Southeast Asia alone--in Thailand, it is called longkong or duku; in Malaysia, it is called langsat or duku-langsat; in the Philippines, it is indeed known as lanzones.

However there exists no formally-recognized direct English term for this fruit as yet. Certain quarters contend that the Americans are more prevalently calling this fruit "lanzon", but so far such a term remains unaccepted, if at all unsubstantiated.

By all indications, practically all the existing English terms for this fruit and plant have so far been limited to those that have been derived or adapted phonetically from origin-al nomenclature.

As an example, the supposed term "lanzon" is presumed to have spawned from the Anglicized pronunciation of "lanzones". The original tri-syllabic pronunciation devolved down to two syllables. This was combined with the conversion from what was interpreted to be a plural word form (lanzone-s), into to a singular word form (lanzone)--when in fact the original Tagalog term is a collective (non-count) noun.

As such, if you are to refer to this plant or to its sweet fruit, you may want to use the original Tagalog term "lanzones"--both in form and in sound. After all, chances are you could be referring to a fruit that was harvested Philippines--perhaps even right from its folklore origin, Paete, Laguna! (where the fruit is reportedly becoming hard to come by).

Hope this helps!

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-01-20 14:26:19 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

my apologies for the typo errors above...it seemed my thoughts outpaced my fingers this time?!

Jake Estrada
Local time: 14:09
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish, Native in TagalogTagalog
PRO pts in pair: 32
Grading comment
Thanks

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Dia Alibo: wow. isn't the sweetest lanzones found in Camiguin Island in southern Philippines? BTw, the Cebuanos down south also call it lanzones.
2 hrs
  -> Yup, I've heard about that, but I'm not sure if the folks from Laguna would agree ;-) They do have a Lanzones Festival in Camiguin Island every Third Week of October (!)I haven't really tasted lanzones from Camiguin, but their beaches are surely pristine!
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