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Хата баби Орисі, діда Миколи,

English translation: Old Orysya, Old Mikola

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14:50 Feb 7, 2009
Ukrainian to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary - Folklore
Ukrainian term or phrase: Хата баби Орисі, діда Миколи,
Коллеги, проблема навіть не вхаті, а в тому, що художник, що назвав малюнок "Хата баби Орисі" чи "Хата діда Миколи" в коментарах підкреслює звязок між хатою на малюнку, світлині та внутрішнім світом стареньких господарів. Таких хат у нього штук з двадцять, і слова дід та баба випустити, зається, не можна. Як би Ви їх переклали?
Viktoriya Volos
Ukraine
Local time: 22:05
English translation:Old Orysya, Old Mikola
Explanation:
None of your choices here are particularly good, so it's the matter of picking between two or three evils. A similar English approach would be to say Aunt (Auntie) and Uncle, but that strongly implies blood relationship - though not necessarily so. Old Man Mykola would sound perfectly fine, but Old Women Orysya doesn't, so this is probably no the way to go. Hence the suggestion above which should be at least acceptable. Good luck.
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The Misha
Local time: 15:05
Grading comment
Thank you
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer

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Summary of answers provided
3Old Orysya, Old MikolaThe Misha


Discussion entries: 3





  

Answers


31 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 3/5Answerer confidence 3/5
Old Orysya, Old Mikola


Explanation:
None of your choices here are particularly good, so it's the matter of picking between two or three evils. A similar English approach would be to say Aunt (Auntie) and Uncle, but that strongly implies blood relationship - though not necessarily so. Old Man Mykola would sound perfectly fine, but Old Women Orysya doesn't, so this is probably no the way to go. Hence the suggestion above which should be at least acceptable. Good luck.

The Misha
Local time: 15:05
Native speaker of: Native in RussianRussian
PRO pts in category: 4
Grading comment
Thank you
Notes to answerer
Asker: I used something like Old Lady Orysya when describing the woman but I wonder it it doesn't imply her social status (and as far as I can judge the photo she is far from being a lady).

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