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LanguagesTermTranslationGlossary name
EnglishYarn: A continuous strand of textile fibers created when a cluster of individual fibers are twisted together. These long yarns are used to create fabrics, either by knitting or weaving.   TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishAbsorbency: The ability of a fabric to take in moisture. Absorbency is a very important property, which effects many other characteristics such as skin comfort, static build-up, shrinkage, stain removal, water repellency, and wrinkle recovery.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishAcetate: A manufactured fiber formed by compound of cellulose, refined from cotton linters and/or wood pulp, and acedic acid that has been extruded through a spinneret and then hardened.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishAlpaca: A natural hair fiber obtained from the Alpaca sheep, a domesticated member of the llama family. The fiber is most commonly used in fabrics made into dresses, suits, coats, and sweaters.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishAngora: The hair of the Angora goat. Also known as Angora mohair. Angora may also apply to the fur of the Angora rabbit. However, according to the U.S. Federal Trade Commission, any apparel containing Angora rabbit hair must be labeled as \"Angora rabbit hair\" on the garment.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBarré: An imperfection, characterized by a ridge or mark running in the crosswise or lengthwise directions of the fabric. BarrŽs can be caused by tension variations in the knitting process, poor quality yarns, problems during the finishing process.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBasket Weave: A variation of the plain weave construction, formed by treating two or more warp yarns and/or two or more filling yarns as one unit in the weaving process. Yarns in a basket weave are laid into the woven construction flat, and maintain a parallel relationship. Both balanced and unbalanced basket weave fabrics can be produced. Examples of basket weave construction includes monk cloth and oxford cloth.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBast Fiber: Strong, soft, woody fibers, such as flax, jute, hemp, and ramie, which are obtained from the inner bark in the stems of certain plants.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBatiste: A medium-weight, plain weave fabric, usually made of cotton or cotton blends. End-uses include blouses and dresses.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBedford Cord: A cord cotton-like fabric with raised ridges in the lengthwise direction. Since the fabric has a high strength and a high durability, it is often used for upholstery and work clothes.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBlend: A term applied to a yarn or a fabric that is made up of more than one fiber. In blended yarns, two or more different types of staple fibers are twisted or spun together to form the yarn. Examples of a typical blended yarn or fabric is polyester/cotton.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBoucle: A knit or woven fabric made from a rough, curly, knotted boucle yarn. The fabric has a looped, knotted surface and is often used in sportswear and coats.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBroadcloth: A plain weave tightly woven fabric, characterized by a slight ridge effect in one direction, usually the filling. The most common broadcloth is made from cotton or cotton/polyester blends.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBrocade: A heavy, exquisite jacquard type fabric with an all-over raised pattern or floral design. Common end-uses include such formal applications as upholstery, draperies, and eveningwear.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBurlap: A loosely constructed, heavy weight, plain weave fabric used as a carpet backing, and as inexpensive packaging for sacks of grain or rice. Also, as fashion dictates, burlap may also appear as a drapery fabric.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishBurn-out: A brocade-like pattern effect created on the fabric through the application of a chemical, instead of color, during the burn-out printing process. (Sulfuric acid, mixed into a colorless print paste, is the most common chemical used.) Many simulated eyelet effects can be created using this method. In these instances, the chemical destroys the fiber and creates a hole in the fabric in a specific design, where the chemical comes in contact with the  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCalendering: A process for finishing fabrics in which such special effects as high luster, glazing, embossing, and moiré are produced.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCalico: A tightly-woven cotton type fabric with an all-over print, usually a small floral pattern on a contrasting background color. Common end-uses include dresses, aprons, and quilts.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCamel\'s Hair: A natural fiber obtained from the hair of the Bactrian camel, a two-humped pack-carrying species. The fiber is used primarily in coats, sweaters, and suits.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCarding: A process which eliminates fibers too short for inclusion in the spun yarn. The process also removes dirt and foreign matter still remaining in the fiber mass, and arranges the fibers into a very thin layer.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCashmere: A luxury fiber obtained from the soft fleecy undergrowth of the Kashmir goat of Tibet, Mongolia, China, Iran, Iraq, and India. Most commonly used in sweaters, shawls, suits, coats, and dresses.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCellulose: A material derived from the cell walls of certain plants. Cellulose is used in the production of many vegetable fibers, as well as being the major raw material component used in the production of the manufactured fibers of acetate, rayon, and triacetate.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishChallis: A lightweight, soft plain weave fabric with a slightly brushed surface. The fabric is often printed, usually in a floral pattern. Challis is most often seen in fabrics made of cotton, wool, or rayon.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishChambray: A plain woven fabric that can be made from cotton, silk, or manufactured fibers, but is most commonly cotton. It incorporates a colored warp (often blue) and white filling yarns.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishChiffon: A plain woven lightweight, extremely sheer, airy, and soft silk fabric, containing highly twisted filament yarns. The fabric, used mainly in evening dresses and scarves, can also be made from rayon and other manufactured fibers.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishChintz: A plain-weave fabric, which has been glazed to produce a polished look. Usually made of cotton, this fabric is most commonly used in blouses, dresses, draperies, and slipcovers.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishColorfastness: A term used to describe a dyed fabric\'s ability to resist fading due to washing, exposure to sunlight, and other environmental conditions.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCombing: The combing process is an additional step beyond carding. In this process the fibers are arranged in a highly parallel form, and additional short fibers are removed, producing high quality yarns with excellent strength, fineness, and uniformity.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishConverter: A person or a company which buys grey goods and sells them as finished fabrics. A converter organizes and manages the process of finishing the fabric to a buyers\' specifications, particularly the bleaching, dyeing, printing, etc.  TEXTILE GLOSS
EnglishCorduroy: A fabric, usually made of cotton, utilizing a cut-pile weave construction. Extra sets of filling yarns are woven into the fabric to form ridges of yarn on the surface. The ridges are built so that clear lines can be seen when the pile is cut.  TEXTILE GLOSS
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Summary of glossaries
Doğal Gaz Boru/İletim Hatları - Natural Gas Pipe Lines/Loops  5
Genel/General  54
IT GLOSS  28701
TEXTILE GLOSS  208
Terms not in any glossary0