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 »  Articles Overview  »  Language Specific  »  Portuguese  »  Some brazilian-portuguese slangs

Some brazilian-portuguese slangs

By Juliana Moreira | Published  09/20/2009 | Portuguese | Recommendation:
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Quicklink: http://www.proz.com/doc/2639
Author:
Juliana Moreira
Brazil
English to Portuguese translator
 

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This is the Part 1 of the first article with some brazilian-portuguese slangs. I hope it helps everyone.

Abelhudo - meddler, nosy person.
Abrir o bico - to confess, to come clean.
Achar o fio da meada - to discover the story, plan, scheme.
Amigo da onça - an insincere friend.
Baleia - a fat woman.
Bater a bota - to die.
Bater com a língua nos dentes - to reveal secret.
Bicho de sete cabeças - a difficult-resolution problem
Boa pinta - a good look person.
Bom garfo - someone who eats a lot.
Canhão- an ugly woman.
Cantar de galo - to praise yourself.
Carta branca - authorization to do whatever you want to do.
Chato - a boring person/situation.
Checar - to check out.
Comer o pão que o diabo amassou - to bear a tough situation.
Custar os olhos da cara - very expensive.


to be continued...


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Knowledgebase Contributions Related to this Article
  • The English in this article needs to be more accurate (Posted by Daniela de Oliveira on 11/16/2009)
    I have included my notes in brackets: Abelhudo - meddler, nosy. Abrir o bico - to confess, to come clean (also: "to grass up", it really depends on the context, the expression in Portuguese has to meanings - to confess something (finally) and to let some information slip out!). Achar o fio da meada - to discover the story, plan, scheme (this isn't very accurate even in Portuguese, we don't say it like this, we say "perder o fio da meada" what means "to lose the point" when talking about something. Nobody "acha o fio da meada" but "perde e reeencontra o fio da meada"). Amigo da onça - an insincere friend ("double-faced" is more the word). Baleia - a fat woman. Bater a bota - to die. Bater com a língua nos dentes - to reveal secret. (to reveal A secret) Bicho de sete cabeças - a difficult-resolution problem (this is not the context, when one says that something is NOT a "bicho de sete cabeças" they mean - "it is not rocket science", or "it is not that difficult or scary". In Portuguese people use this term to define what things ARE NOT, not what they ARE, therefore the translation is somehow inaccurate) Boa pinta - a good look person. (a good LOOKING person) Bom garfo - someone who eats a lot. ( a great eater) Canhão- an ugly woman. Cantar de galo - to praise yourself. (incorrect - "cantar de galo" is more "to boss around", "to hold the court", it isn't to pray oneself) Carta branca - authorization to do whatever you want to do. ("to give authorization...." Chato - a boring person/situation (also annoying). Checar - to check out. Comer o pão que o diabo amassou - to bear a tough situation (it is a bit more than that, that isn't accurate, more precisely "to live through a hard time" or "to weather a difficult patch", or "to suffer a lot"). Custar os olhos da cara - very expensive (if you say "custar os olhos da cara" you should then explain it and translate it accordingly: "to be very expensive" or "to cost a lot".

     
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