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Ann Goldstein: A star Italian translator

Source: The Wall Street Journal
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

One evening this past September, more than 300 people squeezed into a narrow room at BookCourt bookstore in Brooklyn for the launch of “The Story of the Lost Child,” by Italian author Elena Ferrante. The author, whose true identity is a closely held secret, was absent. Instead, the crowd whooped and cheered for the headliner of the evening: the book’s translator, Ann Goldstein.

Translators rarely achieve celebrity status. But as Ms. Ferrante’s star has risen, so too has Ms. Goldstein’s. More.

See: The Wall Street Journal

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Setting up a translation company

Source: JoSTrans
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

“Setting up a translation company”, Lucile Desblache interviews David García-González, Managing Director of GoLocalise.

Watch the videos in JoSTrans here: http://www.jostrans.org/issue25/int_gonzalez.php

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How to learn a new language: 7 tips from TED Translators

Source: TED-Ed Blog
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Knowing more than one language is great for your brain. But what’s the best way to learn? TED’s Open Translation Project volunteers share 7 tips:

1. Get real. Decide on a simple, attainable goal to start with so that you don’t feel overwhelmed. German translator Judith Matz suggests: “Pick up 50 words of a language and start using them on people — and then slowly start picking up grammar.” More.

See: TED-Ed Blog

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How to kick start your international marketing strategy by leveraging content

Source: Search Engine Journal
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Global marketing. Localization. International marketing. Entering emerging markets.

Basically, world domination.

These are large, terrifying words because they represent an even bigger, intimidating marketing strategy. And when you think of putting that strategy into action, the reasons (excuses) start to pile against it:

  • “Global marketing is for deep-pocketed Fortune 500 companies like Coca-Cola or Salesforce.”
  • “It’s just too large of a project to take on right now.”
  • “We really don’t have the bandwidth or budget.”

So you shy away from the thought of expanding beyond the borders of where you set up shop. Until eventually, you hit a ceiling and your company stops growing.

But the fact is that doing the same ol’, same ol’ won’t allow you to continue to grow (how do you think you become a Fortune 500 company, anyway?). There are massive opportunities to be explored in different markets — opportunities that others may see as obstacles or risk.

And investing in a global marketing strategy isn’t as daunting as you might think.

There are small steps you can take to develop a global digital marketing strategy — starting with your content marketing — and they’re all pretty digestible and straightforward. More.

See: Search Engine Journal

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In defense of working with translation agencies

Source: The Savvy Newcomer
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Amidst all the chatter about rates, discounts, treatment of freelancers by agencies, etc., the commonly suggested solution seems to be to stop working for agencies and get direct clients.

I, for one, have absolutely no desire to work for direct clients and wish to speak in defense of the practice of working solely for agencies.

While working for direct clients may appear to be advantageous to us as freelancers, especially in terms of direct compensation, the disadvantages are seldom mentioned. More.

See: The Savvy Newcomer

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5 translation industry predictions for 2016

Source: K International
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

To quote Bob Dylan, times are changing…and the translation industry is changing, too. Every year, the world grows smaller, better connected and more technologically advanced. What will 2016 bring for the translation industry? We’ve dusted off our crystal balls to give you a sneak peak into the future! More.

See: K International

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Workshop on BabelNet, the largest multilingual encyclopedic dictionary

Source: Terminology Coordination Unit of the European Parliament
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

The BabelNet Workshop takes place over two days: the first day is a technical guided tour of BabelNet; the second day of the workshop will be dedicated to presentations providing three Case Studies to show how to make EU resources more effective by linking them to BabelNet.

[...] BabelNet is both a multilingual encyclopedic dictionary, with lexicographic and encyclopedic coverage of terms, and a semantic network which connects concepts and named entities in a very large network of semantic relations, made up of about 14 million entries, called Babel synsets. More.

See: Terminology Coordination Unit of the European Parliament

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Laughs in translation: new web series looks for the funny in every country (videos)

Source: ALTA Language Services
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Don’t let the name fool you — the new web series from comedian Brooks Wheelan is not about how one country’s comedy can be localized to suit another’s tastes. Instead, the globetrotting host – whose credits include a successful 2015 comedy album and a fleeting one-season stint on Saturday Night Live – cozies up to the locals to learn what people around the world love to laugh at.

In the first three episodes of ‘Laughs in Translation’, Wheelan travels to Denmark, Germany, and France. A healthy mix of storytelling, sightseeing, and “man on the street” type interviews accompanies each trip, and even viewers who have no particular interest in comedy will find plenty of wanderlust eye candy in the towering castles and cobblestone streets of the Old World. And if the first episode – where our host visits a well-loved Danish amusement park that boasts scatological sculptures as its chief amusement – is any indicator, there won’t be any shortage of off-the-beaten-path landmarks.

Watch the videos in ALTA Language Services here: http://www.altalang.com/beyond-words/2016/02/03/laughs-translation-new-web-series-looks-funny-every-country/

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How new words are born

Source: The Guardian
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

According to Global Language Monitor, around 5,400 new words are created every year (Oxford Dictionaries Online, evidently using different criteria, reckon 1.8bn). It’s only the 1,000 or so deemed to be in sufficiently widespread use that make it into print. Who invents these words, and how? What rules govern their formation? And what determines whether they catch on?

Shakespeare is often held up as a master neologist, because at least 500 words (including bump, cranny, fitful, lacklustre and pedant) first appear in his works – but we have no way of knowing whether he personally invented them or was just transcribing things he’d picked up elsewhere. More.

See: The Guardian

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The magic number is EUR 0.15: translator rate survey released in Germany

Source: Slator
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Germany’s Federal Association of Interpreters and Translators [Bundesverband der Dolmetscher und Übersetzer e.V. (BDÜ)] published the fifth edition of its rate survey in January 2016. The survey is based on pricing information collected from almost 1,100 translators and interpreters and covers 35 language pairs.

According to André Lindemann, association president, the survey is meant to provide guidance to new translators and inexperienced buyers in this “fragmented and often opaque market,” but should also be of value to many other market participants. The authors of the study stress, however, that the survey in no way represents any kind of official pricing guideline by the Association as this would be against Germany’s anti-trust laws. More.

See: Slator

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What you need to know about EU language law

Source: Slator
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

In a recently published book (EU Language Law), based on PhD research, I explore all current language regulations and arrangements in EU law, such as linguistic regimes of EU institutions, bodies and agencies, language provisions in the area of freedom, security and justice as well as in the internal market. In an exclusive for Slator, I highlight some of the findings of the research in ten points. More.

See: Slator

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Translator training: You have the knowledge, ProZ.com has the tools

Source: Translator T. O.
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

Translators and interpreters make intercultural communication possible through language, sharing ideas and concepts with people throughout the world. It is important that they understand the substance of translated material, use up-to-date software and platforms, and keep an eye on new tendencies in the industry.

The ProZ.com training platform helps beginning and  experienced professionals alike to develop their skills and reach new levels in their careers. Sessions are offered one-on-one, live, or on-demand for greater flexibility in delivering content to translators, interpreters and language professionals. ProZ.com trainers are experienced freelancers and outstanding members of the ProZ.com community who have decided to share their knowledge and expertise with their colleagues through the site’s training platform. More.

See: Translator T. O.

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Language could diagnose Parkinson’s, ALS and Schizophrenia before lab tests

Source: SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Future doctors may ask us to say more than “Ahhh.” Several groups of neuroscientists, psychiatrists and computer scientists are now investigating the extent to which patients’ language use can provide diagnostic clues—before a single laboratory test is run. Increased computing power and new methods to measure the relation between behavior and brain activity have advanced such efforts. And although tests based on the spoken word may not be as accurate as gene sequencing or MRI scans, for diseases lacking clear biological indicators, language mining could help fill the gap. More.

See: SCIENTIFIC AMERICAN

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How are words related?

Source: The Christian Science Monitor
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Some words have dramatically changed meaning throughout the agesAwful once meant impressed or filled with awe, a clue was once a ball of yarn, and being called nice wasn’t always a compliment, having once meant foolish, silly, or ignorant.

But how does a word’s definition change so drastically?

In an attempt to understand how words’ meanings evolve, a team of scientists mapped out the relationships between different words and their meanings in a sort of linguistic snapshot, capturing the process in action.

[...] If you’ve ever learned a new language or translated sentences from one language to another, you know that one word won’t always translate perfectly into another. Some words even have multiple meanings, like the Hawaiian word aloha, which can mean both hello and goodbye.

The team of scientists used such words with multiple meanings, known as polysemous words, to create a semantic network, connecting words through these polysemous translations. The resulting web appears in a paper published Monday in the journal the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. More.

See: The Christian Science Monitor

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How to root out translation errors

Source: Translation Guy Blog
Story flagged by:

Translation errors can be deadly, costly and/or downright embarrassing. So what can you do to prevent them? As we’re fond of saying, “Many eyes keep danger at bay.”

Translation review is an integral piece of the quality assurance process. Here at Responsive Translation we provide multiple rounds of review and reconciliation from qualified linguists to ensure that a translation is, in the immortal words of Goldilocks, “Just right.” But what types of errors are reviewers looking to root out of a translation? More.

See: Translation Guy Blog

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Mastering the art of transcreation

Source: Transform magazine
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Translation is more than a simple swapping of words from one language to the next. Ruth Wyatt explores transcreation and the localisation of brand language.

[...] Good translation doesn’t just mean faithful or accurate transcription from one language to another. If it did, Coca Cola in China would be known as, “Mare stuffed with wax,” or “Bite the wax tadpole,” which is what the Chinese characters that together make the sound ‘Coca Cola’ mean depending on the dialect (Chinese characters have both a sound and a meaning). Instead it has a different name pronounced “Kokou-Kolay”, which means, “A pleasure in the mouth.” Experts in the field refer to this highly successful strategy as transcreation rather than mere translation, or intelligent localisation. More.

See: Transform magazine

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2016 Shortlists for PEN’s translation prizes announced

Source: Translationista
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

This morning, the PEN American Center released the shortlists for their two annual prizes that honor works in translation published in poetry or prose the previous year. The winning books will be announced March 1.

Here are the lists of finalists in each category. More.

See: Translationista

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Localization issues: why do game translators make mistakes?

Source: English to French IT Translator
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Life can be unfair for game translators. You may come up with a fantastic translation for a 100k+ words adventure game, but a single typo or mistranslation will get you trashed on game forums worldwide. One may however wonder why even the best translators can make absurd mistakes and why everybody down the localization chain fails to notice them. More.

See: English to French IT Translator

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Increasing quality and productivity: utilizing the multilingual resources of the European Union

Source: Lingua Greca Translations
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

On July 1, 2013 the European Union welcomed its 28th member state, Croatia, together with its 24th official language.1 The motto of the European Union (EU) is “unity in diversity,” and since it was established, the EU has been committed to multilingualism. As the number of official languages grew from four in 1958 to 24 in 2013, the EU commitment (and challenge) to provide its citizens with access to legislation in multiple languages fostered the development of online resources.

Today, EU treaties, regulations, directives, public documents, and databases are available online free of charge in several languages, and they can be a mine of information and prove very useful to language professionals working on a wide range of subjects. Whether you work on medical, financial, or technical texts, you can take advantage of several interinstitutional websites and databases in almost any language combination of the 24 official languages—that’s 552 language pairs! The following provides an overview of what some of these fabulous resources have to offer. More.

See: Lingua Greca Translations

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4 Tips to deal with a translation agency

Source: Translator Thoughts
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Supposing that you have managed to decide which translation agency suits your needs, the next step is dealing with them. This can be a difficult process sometimes because they might refuse some of your requests, but there is no reason to panic. You just need to develop your negotiating skills in order to obtain what you want. Diplomacy is really important in this case, so we will give you some tips that might be really useful for you. More.

See: Translator Thoughts

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