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NPO offers online Japanese-language classes for resident children from abroad

Source: The Japan Times
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

A Tokyo-based nonprofit organization will begin offering online Japanese-language classes this month to children from abroad who need help to keep up in class at Japanese elementary and junior high schools.

Youth Support Center’s YSC Global School in Fussa, western Tokyo, is set to offer instruction provided by language education experts via personal computers or tablets to young foreign nationals living anywhere in Japan. The NPO will cooperate with municipalities and schools without sufficient resources to teach Japanese to such children. More.

See: The Japan Times

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Is it actually harder to learn a language when you’re older?

Source: The Huffington Post Australia
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Whether you are relocating, heading overseas for work — or, hey, maybe you’re just looking to immerse yourself on your next holiday — picking up a new language is both a useful and appealing tool.

But does it get harder as we get older?

“This is not necessarily a fact. If you set your mind to learning a new language as an adult, there is no reason why you can’t be extremely proficient,” Dr Ahmar Mahboob, Senior Lecturer in the Department of Linguistics at the University of Sydney, told the Huffington Post Australia. More.

See: The Huffington Post Australia

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Small girl who speaks seven languages stuns TV audience

Source: The Telegraph
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Four-year-old Bella Devyatkina has won fans all over the world this week following an appearance on a Russian TV show.

Bella, who lives with her family in Moscow, was a guest on Udivitelniye Lyudi – ‘Incredible People’ – where she showed off her incredible talent for languages.

After speaking to the show’s host in her native Russian, the clip shows her responding confidently to questions posed by adults in English, French, German, Spanish, Chinese and Arabic. More.

See: The Telegraph

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Very basic SEO for your freelance website

Source: Thoughts on Translation
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

SEO for freelancers: how important is it? Many freelancers wonder how important search engine optimization (SEO) is, when it comes to your business website and how much traffic you can expect it to attract. Very important? Not at all important? Somewhere in between? More.

See: Thoughts on Translation

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All phones to have one regional language by 2017; original content is the need of the hour

Source: Tech2
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

This year in India, more feature phone units were shipped to consumers than smartphones, despite analyst expectations that 2016 would finally be the year smartphone sales would exceed those of feature phones. There is low perceived utility for these devices, and one of the reasons is the lack of anything to do on the phone.

Access to critical services such as healthcare, banking, education and governance is restricted because of low availability of content and services in regional languages. To bridge this gap, the Ministry of Electronics and Information Technology (MEITY) has mandated that all smartphones are to have support for one official Indian language apart from English and Hindi by July 2017, according to a report in VCCircle. More.

See: Tech2

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Embracing language rights

Source: IOL
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Amid the current turmoil about student dissatisfaction with the Higher Education system in South Africa, the question of language choice for instruction continues to swelter. The need to construct a national multilingual identity has never been more critical than at present, where there appears to be increasing tensions about implementing multilingual language policies. More.

See: IOL

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Wisconsin courts face interpreter shortage

Source: The Badger Herald
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Looking to address a statewide shortage of interpreters, Wisconsin’s Court System is pushing for more people to join its court interpreter program to ensure that everyone has a voice in the judicial process.

The program, which has been in place since 2003, employs interpreters speaking over 60 languages, Carmel Capati, attorney and manager of theWisconsin Court Interpreter Program, said. But recently, the program has experienced a shortage in languages like Spanish and Arabic among others, Capati said. This has made it difficult for cases to progress through the judicial process. More.

See: The Badger Herald

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One in five Americans now speak a language other than English at home – and Arabic is the fastest growing language

Source: Daily Mail Online
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

A record amount of Americans now speak a language other than English at home, with dramatic increases in the number of Arabic speakers.

According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s 2015 American Community Survey, analyzed by the Center for Immigration Studies, there are now 64.7million Americans over the age of five who speak at least one language other than English. That’s one in five Americans.

The amount is staggering compared to 1990, when less than half that amount (31.8million Americans) reported speaking a second language. And the number of foreign language speaking Americans today is triple the number back in 1980. More.

See: Daily Mail Online

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Children and language: the importance of translation and learning languages

Source: TraductaNet
Story flagged by: Carolina Pedrulho

Learning to speak and write form part of the growing up process of a child from birth. The development of language is more intensive up to five years of age, but it continues throughout adolescence and effectively never ends.

In the early years of life, the stimulation of language is very important for brain development and the acquisition of communication and socialisation skills – also achieved through reading or learning different languages.

This period of children going back to school is the perfect time to reflect on the theme of children and language: what is the role of translation in this learning and what is the importance of learning several languages from an early age? More.

See: TraductaNet

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Parlez-vous? Maine schools struggle to find foreign language teachers

Source: BDN Maine
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

In a taxing scramble to find qualified foreign language teachers, some Maine school districts are turning to digitized assistance to expose their students to other tongues.

More than one have decided to use Rosetta Stone for their foreign or world language instruction, opting for the computer-based software where flesh-and-blood teachers aren’t available.

Madison Area Memorial High School in Somerset County drew widespread media attention last month after it decided to purchase Rosetta Stone to teach its students. Schools in the Bingham, Dyer Brook and Lincoln areas also are relying on computer software.

The shortage of applicants for foreign or world language teacher openings has been especially prevalent in smaller, more remote school districts, where administrators say they’re fighting to attract qualified people to apply. More.

See: BDN Maine

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Can you give us a quote and a turnaround time?

Source: Thoughts on Translation
Story flagged by: Jared Tabor

“Can you give us a quote and a turnaround time?” As freelancers, we hear or read those words a lot: a client, or prospective client, has a document that they need translated, and they want to know about how long it’s going to take, and about how much it’s going to cost. So, when you’re on the receiving end of that request, what’s the best way to proceed? Let’s look at a few options. More.

See: Thoughts on Translation

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Revival of endangered aboriginal language empowers speakers in Yukon

Source: The Globe and Mail
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Riley Vance is perched on a wooden horse in his Whitehorse-area daycare when he starts singing about tidying up in Southern Tutchone, an aboriginal language with fewer than 50 fluent speakers left.

The three-year-old’s ditty is the fruit of an effort in Yukon’s Kwanlin Dun First Nation to teach dozens of children words and phrases in the endangered language daily at a local head-start program. They now have the first ever children’s book in the language.

“We’re at a critical stage with our language with only a few fluent speakers left, so it’s been exciting to have them singing nursery rhymes,” said Erin Pauls, who runs the Dusk’a Head Start program. More.

See: The Globe and Mail

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The interpreter of emotions

Source: The Hindu
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

“Subtitling is an act of kindness,” says Nandini Karky. Conveying the true essence of a scene goes beyond merely translating lines from one language to another. “A subtitler should be empathetic towards the creator as well as the viewer,” she says. Nandini has written subtitles for films, including IPisaasu,Yennai Arindhaal, and Thanga Meengal, and knows first-hand the challenges of subtitling for a film within three or four days, with barely any support from the film’s team. More.

See: The Hindu

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How the Miami Tribe got its language back (Podcast)

Source: PRI
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

The language had been spoken by the Myaamia people, Native Americans who originally lived in what is now Indiana. Also known as the Miami, they were forcibly relocated twice in the 19th century, and ended up scattered throughout the Midwest and beyond — a situation that put pressure on the language even a century ago.

By the 1980s, linguists and tribe members alike thought the language was gone. But then Daryl Baldwin came along. He’d always known he had Myaamia heritage, but it wasn’t until his late 20s that he got interested in the language. More.

Read the full story and listen to the podcast in PRI here: http://www.pri.org/stories/2016-10-14/how-miami-tribe-got-its-language-back

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‘Brand-perfect’ translations drive website success in emerging markets

Source: Talking New Media
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Good translation is a lot like a sleight-of-hand trick. The end result should be so authentic that consumers should never wonder if they’re experiencing content that was originally written in another language.

Good translations require linguistic fluency. But great translations—what my company often calls “brand-perfect” translations—are a different breed. They transcend linguistic fluency by incorporating creativity, attention to detail and cultural knowledge and sensitivity to flawlessly capture a brand’s voice and verve.

Leveraging brand-perfect translations is especially important for companies online, when trying to expand into new global markets. More.

See: Talking New Media

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Skype translator now speaks Russian

Source: eWeek.com
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Skype users can now add Russian to the list of languages the software’s real-time translation service can interpret for them.

“Russian is the eighth most popular spoken language in the world and our Russian-speaking customers around the world have always been particularly enthusiastic about Skype Translator,” announced Microsoft in an Oct. 11 blog post. “For months, we’ve received many requests to include Russian in Skype Translator’s audio language portfolio and we are excited to finally cross this milestone, opening up one of the most dialectically complex languages on earth to anyone with a Skype account.” More.

See: eWeek.com

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A Nigerian woman has turned to YouTube to keep her native language alive

Source: Quartz
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Gbemisola Isimi, a UK-based Nigerian, speaks only Yoruba, her native language, to her two children. Keeping her language alive is important to her. Soon after her first child was born, she looked online for tools to help, but she was out of luck.

“I wanted my daughter to learn the language but I couldn’t find anything online,”she told Quartz.

So Isimi decided to start CultureTreeTV, a YouTube channel which helps kids learn Yoruba using fun, animated videos. Its tagline is “keeping your roots alive.” More.

See: Quartz

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South Korean and French poets collaborate for translation project

Source: koreaportal
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Great poets from South Korea and France met each other in Seoul to work together for translating French poems into Korean language.

Korean poetry was often sung in performances during the 19th century until it was written in Hangul, the Korean traditional writing system, in the beginning of the 20th century. French poetry is determined by the number of syllables not by the number of beats and the poetic tradition in france started in the late 13th century.

According to the Literature Translation Institute of Korea (LTI Korea), South Korea and France had joined forced with the International Poem Center of Marseille and introduced the “Co-translation Atelier for Korean and French Poets.” More.

See: koreaportal

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Is translation tech really ‘breaking language barriers’?

Source: PC Tech Magazine
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Until very recently instantaneous translation tools have been confined to Sci-Fi television. Dr Who’s TARDIS can translate any language in the galaxy, and although the tech world hasn’t yet caught up to the Time Lord, it seems that 2016 really is the year of automated translation services.

Skype’s translation tool launched live early this year, joining similar services on Facebook & Instagram. Google are at it too, but translation experts argue that the tools and apps ignore the complexities of translating and interpreting a language.

The apps are backed by big money, but the result is often nonsensical. As we’re awash with more and more translation tools, are we understanding each other’s languages less than ever? More.

See: PC Tech Magazine

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What is language extinction and why should we care?

Source: NITV
Story flagged by: Paula Durrosier

Almost half of the roughly 6,900 languages spoken around the world today are endangered. Scarily, the rate of extinction is accelerating and there is a whole lot at stake.

Communities around the world are losing their indigenous tongue at an unprecedented rate. The grimmest predictions suggest up to 90% of the world’s languages will have disappeared by the end of this century.

A language becomes extinct when its last native speaker dies, and it’s usually the result of its speakers shifting to a lingua franca like English, Arabic or Spanish. This implies choice, but it’s often a history of marginalisation that leads to the change. More.

See: NITV

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