jubon

English translation: doublet

GLOSSARY ENTRY (DERIVED FROM QUESTION BELOW)
Spanish term or phrase:jubón
English translation:doublet
Entered by: Aida González del Álamo

10:33 Jun 15, 2003
Spanish to English translations [PRO]
Art/Literary / old fashion clothes
Spanish term or phrase: jubon
he encontrado doublet como posible traducción, queria la opinión de algún nativo.
Aida González del Álamo
Spain
Local time: 11:46
doublet
Explanation:
It is indeed an item of clothing. Here's a definition:

"A close-fitting jacket, with or without sleeves, worn by European men between the 15th and 17th centuries."

(American Heritage Dictionary)

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Note added at 2003-06-15 10:40:13 (GMT)
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WordReference suggests \"jerkin\" in addition to \"doublet\". This is defined as follows:

\"A close-fitting, hip-length, collarless jacket having no sleeves but often extended shoulders, belted and worn over a doublet by men especially in the 16th century\".

So if you don\'t like doublet, then go with jerkin. But doublet is suggested by both the Oxford and Collins Spanish dictionaries (WordRef being the online version of Collins), whereas jerkin is only proposed by WordReference/Collins.
Selected response from:

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 23:46
Grading comment
thanks a lot Rowan, have a nice weekend
4 KudoZ points were awarded for this answer



Summary of answers provided
5 +4doublet
Rowan Morrell
5doublet
Michael Powers (PhD)


  

Answers


2 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5 peer agreement (net): +4
doublet


Explanation:
It is indeed an item of clothing. Here's a definition:

"A close-fitting jacket, with or without sleeves, worn by European men between the 15th and 17th centuries."

(American Heritage Dictionary)

--------------------------------------------------
Note added at 2003-06-15 10:40:13 (GMT)
--------------------------------------------------

WordReference suggests \"jerkin\" in addition to \"doublet\". This is defined as follows:

\"A close-fitting, hip-length, collarless jacket having no sleeves but often extended shoulders, belted and worn over a doublet by men especially in the 16th century\".

So if you don\'t like doublet, then go with jerkin. But doublet is suggested by both the Oxford and Collins Spanish dictionaries (WordRef being the online version of Collins), whereas jerkin is only proposed by WordReference/Collins.

Rowan Morrell
New Zealand
Local time: 23:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 339
Grading comment
thanks a lot Rowan, have a nice weekend

Peer comments on this answer (and responses from the answerer)
agree  Michael Powers (PhD)
8 mins
  -> Thanks Mike.

agree  MJ Barber: got mixed up, hid my answer. This is correct.
24 mins
  -> Thanks MJ.

agree  Lucinda Hollenberg
44 mins
  -> Thanks Lucinda.

agree  Maria Luisa Duarte
46 mins
  -> Thanks Maria.
Login to enter a peer comment (or grade)

11 mins   confidence: Answerer confidence 5/5
doublet


Explanation:
As Rowan already stated in the first answer.

The Random House Dictionary states, regarding the meaning of "doublet" with clothes, teh following:

1. a close-fitting outer garment, with or without sleeves and sometimes having a short skirt, worn by men in the Renaissance.
2. an undergarment, quilted and reinforced with mail, worn beneath armor.

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Note added at 2003-06-15 10:58:15 (GMT)
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Oxford Dictionary

jubón m doublet

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Note added at 2003-06-15 11:01:23 (GMT)
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I would trust the American Heritage, Collins and Oxford over the Diccionario de la Real Academia. They are realistic and reflect language as used from a descriptive linguistic point of view - not a prescriptive point of view stating \"it should be\" when in reality it is not.

As a Ph.D. in linguistics, actual usage is more important that a book full of rules prescribing what sould be done.

For example, prescriptive grammar in English says you cannot end a sentence in a preposition. However, most educated (at least one university degree) native speakers would say:

\"I put the trash out.\" just as often or more than \"I put out the trash.\"

Michael Powers (PhD)
United States
Local time: 05:46
Native speaker of: Native in EnglishEnglish
PRO pts in pair: 12685
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