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Mac computers don't get virus? Think again.
Thread poster: Mario Chavez (X)

Meta Arkadia
Local time: 12:07
English to Indonesian
+ ...
More hot air Sep 30, 2017

Mario Chavez wrote:
And Apple is aware of it


This one is - in a way - more serious, and Apple has done something about it in their latest and greatest operating system, High Sierra. Firmware will be checked weekly, and updated if necessary.

Still, the risk for us, mere mortals, is minimal. It requires a very sophisticated criminal who has physical access to a computer. I don't think I will be a target...

The tragedy of this flaw - and Duo admits it - is that only Apple can be checked because their components are well-known. The risk for people with another PC is infinitely higher - and again, Duo acknowledges it. They praise Apple. And so do I.

Cheers,

Hans


 

Meta Arkadia
Local time: 12:07
English to Indonesian
+ ...
The BBC on the boot bug Sep 30, 2017

The BBC ran an article with a less suggestive title "Apple Macs and PCs at risk from boot bug."

Duo Security found that 4.2% of the 74,000 Macs it tested ran insecure versions of software that helps get the machines running.
It said the figure was likely to be replicated in the global population of Macs and worse on PCs.


"The problems we found with Apple are indicative of an industry-wide problem," he said. "On the PC we expect the situation to be quite a lot worse."


Cheers,

Hans


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:07
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
More exceptions? Sep 30, 2017

Meta Arkadia wrote:

Mario Chavez wrote:
I disagree. Social engineering, by definition, expects a few, a small percentage of users or recipients will still ignore warnings or install risky software or click on suspect links.


Except, it's not that easy. To download the malware, you'll have to change the default settings ("Allow apps downloaded from: App Store") in the Security & Privacy settings in the System Preferences. When you try to download the malicious app, you'll get a warning, and another one when you want to install it and run it for the first time. That's why I called it a deliberate action. There's little/nothing Apple can do to prevent it, except forbid to download and run unsigned apps.

Cheers,

Hans

[Edited at 2017-09-30 22:01 GMT]


Sorry, but malware won't be showing a box asking for the user to download or not. Some cyber attacks don't even require downloading of any sort. I wonder if some of us are mixing up poorly written applications for Mac with malicious wares.

I think some of us are getting a bit confused with the nature of the original posting. Nowhere did I say that your Mac computer in particular (and by you I mean the doubters) will invariably and inevitably be affected. My statement was, and still is, that Mac computers have vulnerabilities like any other operating system, period.

For you (again, you as a general audience) to become a target, you have to be an attractive target for a thief, no argument there. It's like our elderly people in Florida who routinely fall prey to phone scams—social engineering at its best (or worst?) because they'd rather hear a human voice and part with some of their money than be cautious. Again, I mean some elderly people.

Some legitimate programs for the Mac would require to disable Allow apps downloaded from: [option] Anywhere but this is not recommended, except for advanced Mac users:
http://osxdaily.com/2016/09/27/allow-apps-from-anywhere-macos-gatekeeper/

Some readers may find the cited articles useful for their particular cases. If someone doesn't, of course, just ignore it and go on your merry way. Nobody knows better than you what methods and best practices to keep your computer system safe work with best results. Just don't dismiss this out of hand because it doesn't apply to you.

Enjoy your international translators' day, everyone.



 

CafeTran Training (X)
Netherlands
Local time: 07:07
Another day, another security breach Oct 6, 2017

https://m.heise.de/mac-and-i/meldung/macOS-10-13-zeigt-Passwort-zu-verschluesseltem-APFS-Volume-als-Merkhilfe-3850782.html

 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:07
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Fixed Oct 6, 2017



It was a minor bug, now fixed.

https://www.macrumors.com/2017/10/05/apple-releases-macos-high-sierra-10-13-supplemental-update/

High Sierra is a new version of the OS and like all new versions, should be avoided until the first few bug fixes have been ironed out. There will be more before HS becomes stable. Not a biggie. Personally I'm still with El Capitan, which is stable.

[Edited at 2017-10-06 07:45 GMT]


 

Mario Chavez (X)  Identity Verified
Local time: 01:07
English to Spanish
+ ...
TOPIC STARTER
Stability with El Capitan Oct 7, 2017

Tom in London wrote:



It was a minor bug, now fixed.

https://www.macrumors.com/2017/10/05/apple-releases-macos-high-sierra-10-13-supplemental-update/

High Sierra is a new version of the OS and like all new versions, should be avoided until the first few bug fixes have been ironed out. There will be more before HS becomes stable. Not a biggie. Personally I'm still with El Capitan, which is stable.

[Edited at 2017-10-06 07:45 GMT]


Tom, what hardware are you using with El Capitan? I have it installed on a 2011 MacBook Pro with double graphic cards. One is the Intel HD graphics 3000, integrated in the motherboard. The other (troublesome one on some MacBook models) is the AMD Radeon HD 6490M card.


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:07
Member (2008)
Italian to English
Hardware Oct 8, 2017

Mario Chavez wrote:

Tom, what hardware are you using with El Capitan?


I have it on 2 computers:

1. A MacMini late 2012 with 16GB Ram and a 524 SSD I added myself.
2. A MacBook Pro 13" mid 2009 with a faster 7200 RPM Seagate internal HD that I added myself.

Both running well. The MacMini is my main machine, which I regularly clone to the MacBook Pro. I'm not upgrading beyond El Capitan because the MacBook Pro can't run Sierra or above.


 

Tom in London
United Kingdom
Local time: 06:07
Member (2008)
Italian to English
System Integrity Protection on the MacOS Oct 11, 2017

"Since OS X Yosemite, kernel extensions, such as drivers, have to be code-signed with a particular Apple entitlement. Developers have to request a developer ID with such an entitlement from Apple.The kernel refuses to boot if unsigned extensions are present, showing the user a prohibition sign instead. This mechanism, called "kext signing" was integrated into System Integrity Protection"

More? Here's a description of why Macs are safe:

See more
"Since OS X Yosemite, kernel extensions, such as drivers, have to be code-signed with a particular Apple entitlement. Developers have to request a developer ID with such an entitlement from Apple.The kernel refuses to boot if unsigned extensions are present, showing the user a prohibition sign instead. This mechanism, called "kext signing" was integrated into System Integrity Protection"

More? Here's a description of why Macs are safe:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/System_Integrity_Protection
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